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2015 - 2019 Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Vaquero / Vulcan 1700 Voyager

2015 - 2019 Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Vaquero / Vulcan 1700 Voyager

A Muscular V-Twin With Plenty Of Roll-On

Kawasaki’s Vulcan 1700 line is well established with the Vaquero and the Voyager — a bagger and full dresser, respectively — both come with ABS and, as the name suggests, the 1700 cc engine in the V-twin configuration with liquid cooling and a six-speed transmission. Ready for a cruise around town or hitting the open road, the Vulcan 1700s are well fitted and all-around solid.

Continue reading for my review of the Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Vaquero and Vulcan 1700 Voyager.

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2017 - 2019 Kawasaki Ninja 650

2017 - 2019 Kawasaki Ninja 650

A Saucy Middleweight Contender

Coming off an update in MY2017, the Kawasaki Ninja 650 remains a very capable sportbike as we move into 2019. The Ninja is powered by a 649 cc, water-cooled engine with all the wizardry needed to earn it a place in the iconic Ninja lineup.

Continue reading for my review of the Kawasaki Ninja 650.

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2015 - 2019 Yamaha V Star 250

2015 - 2019 Yamaha V Star 250

Simple, Classic Lines with a V-Twin Engine

If you’re a carburetor fan, you’re still in luck for a 250 cc commuter bike with the 2019 V Star 250 from Yamaha. Simple, classic cruiser good looks and scooter-like fuel economy make the V Star 250 a no-nonsense choice for a budget-minded or entry-level rider.

Continue reading for my review of the Yamaha V Star 250.

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2014 - 2019 Honda CBR125R

2014 - 2019 Honda CBR125R

Honda produced its CBR125R for one reason, and one reason only; as a trainer bike for new riders who are into, or who want to be into, supersport motorcycles. It’s built to deliver the same eager and agile handling as its larger-displacement siblings, just with a powerplant that meets A1 license requirements. Big-bike style and feel helps train the next generation of would-be fiery-eyed pegdraggers, whether they be destined for that actual “Track Life,” or just want to look like they are. The 125 cc bracket may be the lowest meaningful classification, but it’s also one of the most important as it targets the entry-level market and represents the first real opportunity to instill some brand loyalty. Let’s check out Honda’s littlest CBR today and see what all the Red Riders have going on over there, then we’ll see how it stacks up against one of its domestic competitors.

Continue reading for my review of the Honda CBR125R.

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2019 Yamaha YZF-R125

2019 Yamaha YZF-R125

Enjoy The Thrill Of Riding Balls-To-The-Wall

Yamaha takes early indoctrination to a whole new level with its YZF-R125 meant to scoop up riders who live in areas that use the tiered-license system. That’s right, it’s an R-series model specifically built for A-1 license holders in Europe and the U.K. The trackside DNA is evident in the overall look that borrows heavily from its larger-displacement siblings in keeping with it intended use as an entry-level trainer. Supersport looks and handling meet license restrictions to make this a proper first-timer’s bike, so today, I’d like to take a look at the details and see what it will likely face in the contest to rope in riders and instill brand loyalty at the earliest possible.

Continue reading for my review of the Yamaha YZF-R125.

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2017 - 2019 Kawasaki Z125 PRO

2017 - 2019 Kawasaki Z125 PRO

Experience The Thrill Of Going Fast On A Small Bike

“Cheap thrills” takes on a whole new meaning — or maybe just a revitalization of the old meaning — when it comes to the Z125 PRO from Kawasaki. It’s small and relatively fast for the thrills, good fuel economy, and a bargain-basement price. Sure, as a fun bike, it has that hands down. It’s also a commuter if you have to navigate congested traffic because it’s small, lightweight and narrow so filtering through traffic is a breeze. As a first bike for someone new to two wheels, this is a completely approachable bike, not intimidating at all and without the electronics that frequently get used as a crutch. On this bike, you learn how to ride.

Continue reading for my review of the Kawasaki Z125 PRO.

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2016 - 2019 Yamaha TW200

2016 - 2019 Yamaha TW200

Fuel-Injection Haters Rejoice! Yamaha Still Makes a Carbureted Dual Sport

The Yamaha TW200, brought forward for 2019 with its scrappy little 196 cc engine, is a nice learning bike, fully street legal but with that distinctive motocross-style swale seat that says you’re going off-road. On the move, the bike has nice low-end torque and you’ll feel the front end trying to come up when you get even a little twisty. Dual sport, yes, but so much about this bike just begs to be in the dirt.

Continue reading for my review of the Yamaha TW200.

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2016 - 2019 Yamaha VMAX

2016 - 2019 Yamaha VMAX

Not For The Faint Of Heart

The 1,679 cc engine in the Yamaha VMAX houses mad performance with more than adequate power and torque to give the VMAX plenty of ’go’ and the big, dual six-piston calipers up front give it plenty of ’stop.’ The 2019 VMAX comes dressed to impress, so let’s take a look at what the Tuning-Fork company has in store for us this year.

Continue reading for my review of the Yamaha VMAX.

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2016 - 2019 Yamaha XSR900

2016 - 2019 Yamaha XSR900

A Mix Of Retro Looks and Modern Tech

Influenced by the classic “XS” series from the ’70s and ’80s, the XSR900 from Yamaha shows its roots with retro styling and stepped seating combined with just enough modern tech that you know you’re in the 21st century. At first glance, it looks like a nice little bike: compact and sporty. On second glance...and third...it looks like a whole lot of bike for an affordable price.

Continue reading for my review of the Yamaha XSR900.

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2016 - 2019 Yamaha Bolt

2016 - 2019 Yamaha Bolt

Yamaha’s Urban Performance Bobber

The Yamaha Bolt continues into 2019 with that classic "bobber" style — high tank and short wheelbase — folks here expect to see in old-school styling. Powered by an air-cooled V-twin engine, but with a plenty of technology on board, the Bolt is a good in-between size: not too small that you’ll outgrow it soon and not so big that it is intimidating for new riders. The bobber-style solo seat, easy cruisin’ rider triangle and naked-bike look make the Bolt a choice little bar hopper or commuter ride.

Continue reading for my review of the Yamaha Bolt.

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2017 - 2019 Honda Rebel 300 / Rebel 500

2017 - 2019 Honda Rebel 300 / Rebel 500

A Sportier Look And A New Attitude

Honda brought one of its most recognized model families into the 21st century with a complete overhaul of the much celebrated Rebel range in 2017. Available as the Rebel 300 and 500, this reworked line features water-cooled mills and fuel-injection induction control to meet modern and near-future emissions standards. A sportier look greets the eye this time around, though the Rebel still targets the same small-[cruiser-mot392], entry-level market.

Continue reading for my review of the Honda Rebel 300 and Rebel 500.

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2016 - 2019 BMW R nineT Scrambler

2016 - 2019 BMW R nineT Scrambler

The On-Road Bike With Off-Road Attitude

The new-from-2016, R nineT Scrambler from the Bayerische Motoren Werke (BMW Motorrad) rolls into 2019 still based on a general design popular from the ’50s all the way through the ’70s. The Scrambler embodies the form of the original scramblers, while borrowing from the 1951 Beemer R 68. The result is a ride that invokes nostalgia in those old enough to remember the originals and subsequent variants, but also appeals to a younger crowd who appreciates classic looks coupled with updated performance and more reliable technology than its antique predecessors. I say that with confidence since I fall into the latter group, and I am really digging this new-old ride, so join me for a dissection of this scrambler descendant as I try to determine how closely this apple fell to the tree.

Continue reading for my review of the BMW R nineT Scrambler.

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2016 - 2019 Suzuki DR-Z400S / DR-Z400SM

2016 - 2019 Suzuki DR-Z400S / DR-Z400SM

Suzuki Still Has Carbureted Dual Sports

Pitting the fuel-injection fans against the carburetor fans, we score a point for the latter with the DR-Z400S and DR-Z400SM from Suzuki. Fuel injection hadn’t yet made an appearance in any of Suzuki’s dual-sport lineup, which was a good thing or a bad thing, depending on which side of the fence you’re on. For 2019, the DR-Z siblings haven’t yet been touched by the FI update. Sharing the same engine as the 500EXC from KTM, the DR-Zs come on a different chassis with progressive-link rear suspension. The “SM” — the SuperMoto of the family — and the “S” feature a six-liter air box with quick-release fasteners trouble-free access to the air filter and special low profile mirrors that rotate hoping to avoid damage, both are pluses when you’re playing in the dirt.

Continue reading for more information on the Suzuki DR-Z400S and DR-Z400SM.

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