Motorcycles Ducati Ducati Desmosedici

1983 Ducati 600TL Pantah

1983 Ducati 600TL Pantah High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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  • Ducati 600TL Pantah
  • Year:
    1983
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    583 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin
  • Transmission:
    5-Speed Transmission
  • Displacement:
    583 cc
  • Price:
    € 4000

Ducati introduced the 600TL Pantah at the Milan show in 1981 to complement the 500 and 600SL sports models. It is a roadster with a square headlight, tank and seat and different instruments, including a fuel gauge. Cagiva took over Ducati in 1984 and replaced the Pantahs with their own Alazurra design, making this model a rare find for any Ducati collector.
As far as power is concerned the Ducati 600TL Pantahis is equipped with a 583 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine. The engine’s power is kept in check by a five speeds transmission. It is also worthy of being mentioned that the Pantah was the first of the belt-driven camshaft Ducati motors, the first generation of the current Ducati V twins.

In sound condition, this bike was presented at an auction. The motorcycle has an estimated price of €3.000-€4.000.

Hit the jump for more ipictures of the classic Ducati 600TL Pantah.

2 photos

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Riders For Health Offering Two-Seater Ducati Ride At Silverstone

Riders For Health Offering Two-Seater Ducati Ride At Silverstone

Have any of you ever fancied the thought of riding a MotoGP bike as it goes all-out on a legitimate racing circuit? If you answered yes, you’re in luck because MotoGP’s Riders for Health charity organization is offering interested participants a just to experience just that.

The caveat, of course, is that you actually won’t be riding the MotoGP bike, in this case the Ducati Desmosedici, by yourself. You’re going to have be accompanied by a professional rider in a two-seater version of Ducati’s MotoGP-prepped racing horse.

The ride-along will take place during the Silverstone leg of the MotoGP calendar on the weekend of August 30, 2015. More importantly, MotoGP racer Randy Mamola and Ducati test rider Franco Battaini will both be in attendance, ready to offer a rider to anybody willing enough to experience the frenetic feeling of riding a real MotoGP race bike.

The rides will make use of a specially modified version of the Desmosedici, complete with a reinforced suspension system and rear subframe, stronger spring with improved compression braking, and higher preload to accommodate the extra weight of another full-sized adult riding shotgun on the bike.

There’s still no word on how much the ride-along is going to cost, but with the involvement of Riders for Health, you can be sure that whatever that amount is will go to the charity organization to help with its mission of supplying motorcycles and maintenance for health workers in African countries.

Continue reading to read more about Riders For Health’s Ducati Two-Seater Ride promotion.

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Ducati Loses Concessions in MotoGP Beginning In 2016 Season

Ducati Loses Concessions in MotoGP Beginning In 2016 Season

By its own standards, Ducati has had a pretty successful season. It’s been competitive in all of the races and for a large majority of the first few legs of the season, it’s been the most consistent with six podium finishes in eight races. But the team’s impressive run this season will have its downside beginning next year when it losses all of its concessions for the 2016 MotoGP season, putting in under the same rules as Yamaha and Honda. Welcome to the wacky and sometimes confusing world of MotoGP.

As per the current rules Yamaha and Honda fall under, Ducati will begin the 2016 season with a similar set of rules, one that includes a limit of seven engines per season, no in-season development, and a restriction on testing using factory riders. It’s a far cry from the rules Ducati currently enjoys, including the allowance for 12 engines per season, which they are free to develop during the year, and unlimited testing.

Unfortunately for Ducati, the success they’ve enjoyed this season comes with a price. The Desmosedici GP15 has also proved to be a capable and competitive bike in the series, despite it still being a young project compared to what Yamaha and Honda have at their disposals.

The Grand Prix Commission’s decision to strip Ducati of its concessions was expected by those who saw how competitive the team has been this season. That said, the timing of the announcement was a little surprising since the season has not concluded yet. But according to numerous reports, the GPC decided to act earlier to give Ducati time to prepare ahead of what could be a dramatically different 2016 season for the team.

Once the changes are put in place, Ducati will receive the same concessions as Yamaha and Honda. In addition to what I already mentioned, some of these other concessions include the same amount of fuel, same spec electronics, and same allocation of tires.

It’s the price Ducati will soon pay for the success it’s been having this season. It seems a little weird for the MotoGP novice to have these rules in place, but that’s the series’ way of balancing the playing field for all participating teams, something I wish Formula One would do at some point in the future.

Continue reading to read more about Ducati losing its MotoGP concessions beginning in the 2016 season.

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Ducati Desmosedici GP15 Delayed Ahead of First MotoGP Testing Session

Ducati Desmosedici GP15 Delayed Ahead of First MotoGP Testing Session

The Ducati Desmosedici GP15 is still knee-deep in development so if you were looking forward to seeing the all-new racing bike in time for the first testing session of the upcoming MotoGP season, prepare yourself for some bad news. According to MotoMatters, the development of the bike is still underway and unless something dramatic happens, the GP15 won’t make to the series’ first test run in Sepang, Malaysia this coming February 2015.

Instead, Ducati Corse boss Luigi Dall’Igna said that Ducati’s MotoGP racing team will be bringing an improved version of last year’s bike, called the GP14.3. Apparently, Ducati wants to cover all of its bases with the development of the new GP15, refusing to leave any stones unturned. The GP15 is, after all, a completely new bike, developed from the ground up with a new engine, or at least an upgraded version of the team’s desmodromic V4 layout engine. There have been no specific details on how powerful the engine will be, but all signs seem to point to a shorter engine with a modified gearbox to make the drivetrain lighter and more compact. The bike maker is also reportedly looking at using a heavier crankshaft in an effort to improve the throttle response of the bike ahead of its maiden season in MotoGP.

So cool of on the excitement a little bit. The GP15 is still scheduled to compete in the 2015 season of MotoGP. It just won’t make it to the first testing session at Sepang. The earliest it can make its testing debut will likely be on the second Sepang test later next month, but he safest bet might be the Qatar test session in the middle of March 2015.

Click past the jump to read more about the Ducati Desmosedici GP15 after the jump.

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1983 Ducati 600TL Pantah

1983 Ducati 600TL Pantah

Ducati introduced the 600TL Pantah at the Milan show in 1981 to complement the 500 and 600SL sports models. It is a roadster with a square headlight, tank and seat and different instruments, including a fuel gauge. Cagiva took over Ducati in 1984 and replaced the Pantahs with their own Alazurra design, making this model a rare find for any Ducati collector.
As far as power is concerned the Ducati 600TL Pantahis is equipped with a 583 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine. The engine’s power is kept in check by a five speeds transmission. It is also worthy of being mentioned that the Pantah was the first of the belt-driven camshaft Ducati motors, the first generation of the current Ducati V twins.

In sound condition, this bike was presented at an auction. The motorcycle has an estimated price of €3.000-€4.000.

Hit the jump for more ipictures of the classic Ducati 600TL Pantah.

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1983 Ducati 900 Mike Hailwood Replica

1983 Ducati 900 Mike Hailwood Replica

A vintage Ducati 900 Mike Hailwood Replica was auctioned with an estimated price of €8.000-€12.000. The motorcycle was launched in 1979 and is powered by a 973 cc Desmo SOHC V-Twin engine mated on a five speeds transmission. The MHR S2 model on offer was in good unrestored condition, and its eye-catching red and green fairing combined with its gold Campagnolo alloy rims will ensure that it continues to stand out.

When Mike Hailwood returned from New Zealand to the Isle of Man TT in 1978 on a privateer Ducati 900 SS, he was 38 years old and had not raced there in 11 years. His runaway win set the stage for the most popular version of the 900 SS, the MHR.

The red, white and green Mike Hailwood Replica 900 SS was introduced in 1979 and was an immediate success. Ducati tweaked the model several times to make it more user-friendly. The fairing became a two-piece in 1981, making service matters easier, and side panels were added to cover the battery and rear carburettor. In 1983, the Series 2 MHR included an electric start, an improved three-dog gearbox, Oscam wheels to take tubeless tyres, a narrower two-piece fairing, new alternator and a hydraulic dry clutch. Some bikes had Silentium mufflers, while others retained Contis.

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1995 Ducati Troll Supertwin

1995 Ducati Troll Supertwin

A classic 1993 Ducati Troll Supertwin was auctioned with an estimated price of €10.000-€15.000. After it was launched on the market, the motorcycle managed to gain pretty fast the “icon” status and conquered the heart of many riders. It is powered by a 904 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin unit mated on a six speeds transmission.

Built for the Sound of Singles series in Europe, only 67 were constructed from 1993-97, and Robert Holden placed 2nd in the Isle of Man TT on one. The “look” was so striking that Dutch company Troll offered a Supertwin Troll kit for your 900 SS—you provided the engine, and Troll came up with a rolling chassis, stylish body work and frame. However, it was very expensive, and only 13 were built. The bike on offer is No. 1 and the only one constructed with Ohlins suspension. In bright yellow, it is as new and an unrepeatable opportunity for the serious collector.

Hit the jump for more pictures of the Ducati Troll Supertwin.

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1983 Ducati 500SL Pantah Desmo

1983 Ducati 500SL Pantah Desmo

The Ducati 500L Pantah Desmo was auctioned with an estimated price of €3.000-€4.000. At the heart of the motorcycle lies a 499 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine which is mated on a five speeds transmission. The motorcycle has a pretty interesting history behind it and is one of Ducati’s iconic models.

At the end of the 1970s, Ducati was in trouble. The vertical twins weren’t selling, so management went to designer Fabio Taglioni to see if he had any ideas. He handed them plans for another ground-breaking V-twin, based on his 1973 Armaroli DOHC Grand Prix racer.

The new bike was the belt-drive camshaft 500-cc V-twin Desmo Pantah, and its racing version, the TT2, would win four Formula 2 world championships between 1981-84. Taglioni’s new engine was smaller and quieter than the outgoing bevel-drive twins and was fitted in a trellis frame. The belt drive would be a feature of Ducati engines from that day forth. The Pantah’s electronics were by Nippon Denso, brakes were by Brembo, and its top speed was about 120 mph. The bike on offer is in good original condition with two-into-one exhaust, and many collectors prefer the early, smoother fairing.

Hit the jump for more pictures of the Ducati 500SL Pantah Desmo.

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1999 Ducati 748 Biposto

1999 Ducati 748 Biposto

An old Ducati 748 Biposto was auctioned with an estimated price of €3.000-€4.000 (the bike was sold at a final price of €2.925). The motorcycle’s specifications included a 748 cc DOHC liquid-cooled Desmo V-twin paired with a six speeds transmission. The bike on offer was an original example in red with gold wheels.

The Ducati 748 was launched in 1995 as the smaller sister to the 916 and eligible to compete in the 600 Supersport class against the 600-cc four-cylinder Japanese racers. It was available as an SP and a dual seat Biposto; the SP generated 104 horsepower at 11,000 rpm, while the Biposto used milder Strada cams and produced 98 horsepower. The SP topped out at 154 mph, the Biposto at 151 mph. A number of riders have observed that the 748 engine is actually sweeter and likes to rev more freely than the torquier 916, which probably accounted for the model’s popularity.


Hit the jump for more pictures of the Ducati 748 Biposto.

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1992 Ducati 900 Super Sport

1992 Ducati 900 Super Sport

A classic Ducati 900 Super Sport was auctioned with an estimated price of €2.800-€3.800 and was sold with at a final price of €1.755.

In a series of strokes, Ducati had divided its liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, four-valve competition department from its two-valve, air-cooled street bike fans. The 900 SS was so well sorted that it changed very little until it was replaced in 1997. The 900 Super Sport remains a definitive Ducati experience, and many have been kept for lengthy periods by proud owners.

The troublesome Weber carburettor was replaced with Mikuni flat slides in 1990, and after this tweak performance almost matched the fuel injected 907 IE Paso. The rake was steepened to 25 degrees, a shorter swing-arm reduced the wheelbase, and longer rear shock quickened the steering. Showa adjustable front forks replaced the Marzocchis, and bigger Brembo disc brakes were fitted. The clip-on bars were raised and the foot-pegs lowered.

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1975 Ducati 750 Super Sport

1975 Ducati 750 Super Sport

A classic Ducati 750 Super Sport was put on sale at an auction with an estimated price of €15.000-€20.000. This bike is in nice condition with good paint and chrome and alloy wheel rims.

When the 401 round-case 750 Ducati Super Sports were completed in 1974, two-strokes looked like they were going to dominate Formula 750, with the Yamaha TZ 700 leading the way. Ducati elected to contest endurance racing, which did not restrict engine size. They bumped up the 750 SS engine by using a pair of 450 racing pistons to create an 864-cc motor—the 900 SS.

In 1975, both the 900 SS and 750 SS used the square-case engine, with the 860 sleeved down to make the 750 SS. They were basically the same bare-bones production racers as the 1974 models, with right-side shift, a small CEV taillight, fibreglass gas tank, Conti pipes, open bellmouth carburettors and no turn signal provisions.

Only 246 ‘900 Super Sports’ and 249 ‘750 Super Sports’ were built, and an amazing 198 of the 500 went to Australia. The 1976 Super Sports would be civilised, with left-side shifting, steel gas tanks, carburettor air cleaners and quieter Lanfranconi mufflers (though Contis would usually be included in the crate).

Any 1975 750 Super Sport would be a rare find indeed these days, and this model is always sought after by serious Ducati collectors.

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1981 Ducati 600SL Pantah Desmo

1981 Ducati 600SL Pantah Desmo

As the 1970s wound down for Ducati, designer Fabio Taglioni found himself back in favour and produced a rabbit out of the hat. It was the 500-cc belt-drive camshaft V-twin Desmo Pantah, whose racing sibling, the TT2, would hand Ducati four Formula 2 world championships between 1981-84. Taglioni’s design was significantly smaller and quieter than the outgoing bevel-drive twins, as well as much cheaper to build. When the engine was boosted to 600 cc in 1980, the few teething troubles were solved, and the 600SL gained a better fairing and a hydraulic clutch. Electronics were by Nippon Denso, brakes were by Brembo, and top speed was increased slightly from the 500SL, at around 124 mph.

One of these classic models was put on sale with an estimated price of €3.500-€5.000. The bike on offer is finished in the distinctive silver fairing with red inserts and gold Campagnolo alloy rims, presented in good original condition aside from its modified fairing. At the heart of the motorcycle lies a 583 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine which sends power to the rear wheel through a five speeds.

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1987 Ducati 350 F3 Edizione Speciale

1987 Ducati 350 F3 Edizione Speciale

Japan was one of the biggest markets for Ducati in the 1980s but limited sport bikes to 400 cc, so smaller versions of the F1 were sold there as the F3 from 1986-88. A similar restriction in Italy was set at 350 cc, and a red and white F3 was sold there in, only available in 1986. The Japanese 400-cc F3 generated 45 horsepower, while the Italian 350 F3 made 42.5. Basic suspension was fitted to the little bikes: 35-mm Marzocchi forks and 260-mm dual discs with Brembo callipers. The two models each weighed 364 pounds, and the 350 F3 was tested at 110.8 mph, which is quite respectable.

A model of this type was auctioned with an estimated price of €4.000-€5.000. The motorcycle is a Special Edition in sound original condition, with a tasty red and white paint and a dual seat. Power comes from a 349 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin which is paired with a five speeds transmission.


Hit the jump for more pictures of the 2013 Ducati 350 F3 Edizione Speciale.

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1975 Ducati 750 SS Corsa

1975 Ducati 750 SS Corsa

A unique Ducati 750 SS Corsa was auctioned with an estimated price of €40.000-€60.000. The bike was ridden by former Ducati test rider Carlo Saltarellie who partnered with four-time world champion Walter Villa in the Misano 12 Hour Endurance race in 1978.

The Ducati 750 SS Corsa is fitted with an Imola fairing and 1976 series NCR tank/seat unit. Power comes from a 750-cc Desmo V twin engine which remains one of the most significant two-wheeled designs ever created. The engine is mated on a five speed gearbox.

In terms of suspensions the Ducati 750 SS Corsa comes with Marzocchi special forks and Marzocchi adjustable rear shocks.

Other features include twin Dell’ Orto PHM 40-mm carburettors, a front oil cooler, endurance lights, competition exhaust, Veglia tachometer, lightweight clutch and flywheel. It has an original NCR frame steel “molibdeno.”

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati 750 SS Corsa.

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1996 Ducati 916 Biposto

1996 Ducati 916 Biposto

The Ducati 916 was launched at the Milan Show in October 1993 and made even more of a splash than the Supermono did the year before. While the engine wasn’t significantly different from the 851, it was designed to be easier to service—which was a huge advance—and observers commented on the beautifully detailed workmanship. The engine developed 104.3 horsepower at 9,000 rpm, according to Cycle World, but improved aerodynamics made the 916 significantly faster, clocking 10.72 seconds for the quarter-mile at 130.62 mph and a top speed of 159 mph. The 916 won every magazine’s Bike of the Year award for 1994. The example on offer is a totally original and well-maintained example, in the less common and more attractive bright yellow colour, with gold wheels.

It is powered by a 916 cc liquid cooled DOHC Desmo V-twin engine which is paired with a six speed transmission and has an estimated price of 3.500-€5.000.

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1958 Ducati 600 TT Pantah

1958 Ducati 600 TT Pantah

With the bevel drive 900NCR losing its competitive edge, in 1980 Franco Farne developed two of the new belt-driven Pantahs for the Italian national junior championship. They were based on the standard SL frame but with Marzocchi suspension and red and yellow bodywork that looked like the 900NCR. The 583-cc Desmo twin developed 70 horsepower at 9,000 rpm, and the bike on offer here is one of those bikes, presented without its full race fairing.

Presented in good order, this particular bike has Marzocchi forks and shocks, adjustable rear shock absorber, Brembo brakes, racing exhaust and Campagnolo wheels. This bike came from Reparto Corse of Ducati and was purchased by Team Saltarelli and refitted for the 1981 race season, winning the Italian TT junior championship ridden by Amerigo Saltarelli, Carlo’s brother.

The model on offer has an estimated price of €18.000-€20.000 and is powered by a 597 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine paired with a five speeds transmission.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati 600 TT Pantah.

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2010 Ducati Desmosedici GP10 CS1

2010 Ducati Desmosedici GP10 CS1

Ducati auctioned the famous Desmosedici GO10 CS1 which is Stoner’s Phillip Island-winning model. The motorcycle comes without the small fairing winglets as they were removed to reduce lift. The Ducati Desmosedici GP10 CS1 has won the race with an average speed of 175.100 kmph. It will be supplied with a certificate of authenticity from Ducati Corse (racing department), and the new owner will be given a VIP tour of the Ducati factory in Bologna.

At the heart of the bike lies a 200+ hp liquid-cooled, 90-degree 799 cc V-4 four-stroke, desmodromic DOHC engine with four valves per cylinder. The engine is mated on a six-speed cassette-type gearbox with alternative gear ratios available and a dry multi-plate slipper clutch.

In terms of suspension, the Ducati Desmosedici is packed with a front Öhlins upside-down 48 mm front forks and a Öhlins rear shock absorber, adjustable for preload, compression and rebound damping.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati Desmosedici GP10 CS1.

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2011 Ducati Desmosedici GP11 VR2

2011 Ducati Desmosedici GP11 VR2

The Ducati Desmosedici GP11 VR2 was auctioned by Ducati with an estimated price of €300.000-€350.000. The motorcycle was the second of four variations Rossi raced during the 2011 season but is ostensibly the same as the GP10 of the previous season.

The motorcycle is fitted with a 800-cc D-16 engine and the suspension was an Öhlins TRSP25 48-mm “Through Rod” front fork with a TRSP44 rear shock absorber.

The bike had also received a new carbon airbox and a new electronics package designed to soften the savage throttle response lower down. A more sophisticated traction control system was also introduced, and engine revisions included a higher inertia and crankshaft to further tame the throttle response.

As MotoGP moves into a new era in 2012, Rossi’s GP11 exemplifies the evolution of the 800-cc D16 from the world-beating GP7 through until the end of this formula in 2011. The GP11 was the ultimate development of the D16 that provided Ducati their only MotoGP World Championship.

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1975 Ducati 750 SS Corsa

1975 Ducati 750 SS Corsa

The history of the Ducati 750 SS Corsa is pretty interesting as is strongly related to the famous Mike Hailwood.

Mike Hailwood’s comeback victory at the Isle of Man in 1978, 11 years after he had retired and at the age of 38, holds a warm spot in the heart of every Ducati fan. But mention Paul Smart at Imola in 1972, and one will generate even more enthusiasm. At that Italian racetrack on 23 April, 1972, 70,000 race fans watched underdog Ducati defeat the world’s best riders on what were previously assumed to be the world’s best bikes. The riders included world champion Giacomo Agostini, Phil Read, Cal Rayborn and Walter Villa competing in the inaugural 200-mile race, much like Europe’s Daytona, with more than $40,000 in prize money.

Agostini took off in the lead with Smart and Spaggiari behind him, but Smart passed him on lap four and Spaggiari a lap later. After that, the two Ducatis diced with each other until the finish—Spaggiari passing Smart but then running wide as he started to misfire, low on fuel. The Ducatis finished one-two at an average speed of 97.76 mph, with Smart, Spaggiari and Agostini sharing the fastest lap at 100.1 mph. The “green frame” Ducati 750 Super Sport had arrived.

However, it looked as though two-strokes were soon going to rule Moto GP, and Ducati switched the V-twin to endurance racing, which had no engine restrictions. By boring the cylinders to 86 mm and using 450 racing pistons, the 864-cc 900 SS was created. The new bike made its race-winning debut at Montjuich Park, Barcelona, where Benjamin Grau and Salvador Canellas won the 24 hours endurance race in July 1973.

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1970 Ducati 350 Desmo

1970 Ducati 350 Desmo

In 1968, the wide-case 350-cc Mark 3 Desmo was the fastest production Ducati one could buy, with 103 mph on tap, or 112 mph with a noisier megaphone pipe. There were several options: high touring bars instead of clip-ons and even a racing kit with more radical camshaft, fairing a range of main jets and megaphone exhaust.

The bike was unmistakable with early examples having twin filler caps on the fuel tank and the white-faced Veglia tachometer on the right fork crown. The fuel tank was chrome plated on the sides, with a metal Ducati badge, and the headlight and fenders were chrome plated.

When the 450-cc engine was introduced in 1969, the range was redesigned somewhat, with a square-slide Dell’Orto carburettor replacing the previous SS1, a single filler cap fuel tank and individual speedometer and tachometer, instead of the headlight-mounted speedo in the 1968 model. A cut-off Silentium exhaust silencer replaced the bullet exhaust.

Cycle magazine tested the 250-, 350- and 450-cc models imported to the U.S. and reported that the 250-cc and 450-cc engines had a wide power band, while the 350-cc was basically a bottle-rocket, with power coming on with a rush at 6,500 rpm. Not surprisingly, the 450 cc was fastest through a quarter-mile at 16.6 seconds, but the 350 did it in 17.6 seconds, and that was cut to 15.15 seconds with a megaphone exhaust, suggesting that the Silentium pipe restricted the bikes performance significantly.

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1992 Ducati 888 SBK Corsa

1992 Ducati 888 SBK Corsa

By 1991, the Ducati 888 had won 23 World Superbike races and had only been beaten once. Doug Polen on his Fast by Ferracci bike won 17 races and even held the outright lap record at Jarama for a significant period. World Super Bike had become a huge spectator sport, with recognisable machines that riding fans could relate to, and the 888-cc V-twin Ducatis were dominating the 750-cc four-cylinder Kawasakis, Hondas and Suzukis.

Giancarlo Falappa joined the Ducati team in 1990 after a year with Bimota where he finished 6th in the WSB series, scoring three wins. Known as the “Lion of Jesi” (pronounced “Lesi”) for his hometown, Falappa was a bold and charismatic rider, and 1992 would be his best year in WSBK.

Falappa won four of the 26 WSB races in 1992, in a fearsome riding style developed in motocross, where he got his start. Many of Falappa’s best performances can be seen on video, including leaning on Scott Russell in a corner towards the end of the first race at Spa as well as the close-run battle with future champion Carl Fogarty at Assen, which he followed with a wheelie victory lap.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati 888 SBK Corsa.

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1974 Ducati 750 SS Corsa

1974 Ducati 750 SS Corsa

A classic 1974 Ducati 750 SS Corsa was presented to an auction by a private seller. The bike has an estimated price of € 40.000 - € 60.000 and was prepared at Reparto Corse Ducati with the help of Franco Farne and is Carlo Saltarelli’s own 750 SS which he campaigned as a privateer in both 1974 and 1975. The model was painted grey in 1974, then carrying race number 43, and then repainted white and red, carrying number 23.

The frame and engine numbers suggest this machine left the factory as a 750GT and was up-rated to the competition specification in period. The comprehensive specification includes Marzocchi front forks, adjustable rear Marzocchi shocks, Scarab brakes, Veglia competition tachometer, Tommaselli handlebars, front oil cooler, competition exhaust, competition camshafts, twin Dell’Orto PHM 40-mm carburettors, lightweight clutch, lightweight pistons and Borrani rims.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati 750 SS Corsa’s history.

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1978 Ducati 860 NCR Corsa

1978 Ducati 860 NCR Corsa

A reserve bike prepared by NCR for Hailwood in the 1979 was put on sale by a private owner with an estimated price of €20.000-€30.000. The body of the bike was NCR, the engine was up-rated, but the frame was a standard 900 SS.

The bike has Brembo brakes, Marzocchi forks and Marzocchi rear shocks. It has a Veglia competition tachometer, twin Dell’Orto PHM 40-mm carburettors, front oil cooler, Campagnolo wheels oil pressure gauge, Verlicchi handlebars and light clutch.

All enthusiasts know the story of Mike Hailwood’s return to the Isle of Man TT races in 1978 and his success on the Steve Wynne Ducati 900 SS, which led to Ducati’s first World Championship.

At 110.62 mph, Hailwood broke Phil Read’s lap record by nine mph on the way to an immensely popular victory. He followed up with a win at Mallory Park the next weekend, a crash at Donington and a 3rd place at Silverstone against much faster opposition. Ducati was thrilled with the TT result and promised to build Mike Hailwood replicas and also give Hailwood a factory bike for the 1979 TT.

Hailwood tested the 1979 F1 bike at Misano but crashed before any changes could be made, cracking two ribs. After numerous delays, Ducati sent two NCR endurance race bikes to England; one was an endurance machine, and the other was a TT1 variant with a wet clutch engine. Wynne tried numerous modifications—even fitting the 1978 frame—but the bikes could not produce enough power and handled poorly. The best Hailwood could do was 5th place in the TT, and he declined to ride the endurance bike in any other races.

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1980 Ducati 900 Super Sport Darmah

1980 Ducati 900 Super Sport Darmah

The mid-’70s were not kind to Ducati. The company discontinued the excellent 250/350/450 singles and 750 round-case GT, Sport and Super Sport and tinkered with clumsy parallel twins, as well as the valve-spring 860GT and 900GTS. This left die-hard customers to kick-start the brutal 900 Super Sport Desmo twin for the Ducati experience. Surely, there had to be some middle ground… That finally emerged in 1978 with the Darmah 900 Sport Desmo, designed by Tartarini, and it became the company’s mainstay for five years. It was a detuned 900 SS, with smaller carbs, an electric start, two-up seat, Bosch electronic ignition, Nippon Denso gauges, warning lights and Bosch headlight and indicators. Best of all, the price was very competitive with the Japanese bikes.

Another twist appeared in 1979 when the Darmah SS was introduced. With handsome two-tone paint, it was only made from 1979-81. The 900 SS Darmah is a collectible machine today and its estimated price is €8.000-€10.000.

Specifications: 864 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin, five speeds.

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1979 Ducati 900 SD Darmah

1979 Ducati 900 SD Darmah

The mid-’70s were not kind to Ducati, which had discontinued its 250/350/450 singles and round-case 750 GT, Sport and Super Sport and had pinned its hopes on parallel twins, the non-Desmo 860 GT and 900 GTS. The 900 Super Sport had passionate adherents but needed to have broader appeal. That happened in 1977 with the Darmah 900 Sport Desmo, which was the company’s mainstay for five years. It was a detuned 900 SS, with smaller 32-mm carbs, an electric start, two-up seat, Bosch electronic ignition, Nippon Denso gauges, warning lights, headlights and indicators. Best of all, the price was competitive with Japanese bikes. People remember the 900 Super Sport fondly, but the Darmah is probably more historically important.

One of these original bikes was presented at an auction wearing an attractive black and gold paint job for the fairing and wheels. It is from the second production run, complete with luggage storage.

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1991 Ducati 907 I.E. Desmo

1991 Ducati 907 I.E. Desmo

The Ducati Paso first came to life in 1984 after the Cagiva brothers officially took over Ducati. Concerned that the company lacked enough product models, the new owners approached Massimo Tamburini, recently the “ta” of Bimota. They asked him to build a bike that came with a revised square-tube frame that was developed for Yamaha’s FJ1100. And so, the Ducati Paso was born.

The Paso was designed to carry a rear cylinder that was rotated so that a single Weber 44DCNF 107 carburetor could control both cylinders. In 1991, Mikuni carburettors were substituted and finally replaced by a Weber Marelli fuel injection from the 851. Unlike some of the Italian bike maker’s enduring models, the Paso line didn’t last very long as the model was discontinued in 1992.

This particular model, a 1991 907IE Desmo, is the final version of the Paso. It has a 904 cc fuel-injected SOHC Desmo V-twin engine mated to a six-speed transmission and 17" wheels replacing the undesirable 16" size, which turned in too sharply. The bike is in good original condition and with an aftermarket exhaust, it’s got some life left.

The bike was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auction in Monaco. Estimated bid price for the bike was at €2,800 - €3,800 ($3,400 - $4,700 at the current rates), although it was only sold for €2,048 ($2,500 at the current rates).

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1990 Ducati 750 Paso Desmo

1990 Ducati 750 Paso Desmo

In 1985, a new era for Ducati began after ownership was transferred from the Italian Government EFIM Group to Cagiva, based in Varese in Northern Italy. Under Cagiva, Ducati’s first all-new model was the Paso Desmo.

The Paso was designed to generate a broader public appeal, one that would spearhead a new generation of bikes that would allow Ducati to reinvent itself. The Paso made use of a 748cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine that came mated to a six-speed transmission.

In addition, the Paso came with plenty of significant changes, including the reversed rear cylinder head to allow the installation of a dual-throat automotive-style Weber carburetor. The bike also had a box-section steel frame was a traditional double downtube, full cradle design, with an aluminum swing-arm and linkage rear suspension, and last, a pair of 16" Oscam wheels fitted with low radial tires.

The bike was scooped up at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco at a price of €1,170, which is around $1,500 based on current exchange rates.

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1972 Ducati 450 Desmo Corsa Replica

1972 Ducati 450 Desmo Corsa Replica

The wide-case Ducati 450-cc Desmo single was the fastest production Ducati anybody could buy before the birth of the V-twin 750 Sport. That’s why when one of these models hits the market, they become so highly sought after.

The Desmo Corsa Replica is powered by a 436cc SOHC Desmo single engine and mated to a five-speed transmission. The engine comes with twin spark plugs, a single Dell’Orto PHM 40-mm carburettor, twin Bitubo rear shock absorbers and Marzocchi forks. The wheel rims are alloy, and the five-speed gear shift is mounted on the left.

Though built as a hill climb racer in 1990, the bike on offer is based on a 1972 example and is said to have been ridden by no less than Marcello Peruzzi, who won the Italian Historic Hillclimb challenge in 1995.

The bike was sold at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco for €9,360 ($11,700), fairly below the €14,000 - €18,000 ($17,500 - $22,500) that it was expected to fetch.

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1976 Ducati 500 Sport

1976 Ducati 500 Sport

Everything about the Ducati 500 Sport speaks about the tremendous tradition of the Italian bike maker.

First launched in 1975 on the 350 cc and 500 cc vertical twin engines, the Ducati 500 Sport shared the design cues of the 860GT, a bike that didn’t perform in the market as Ducati would have liked. Trying to cut their losses, they decided to combine the design of the 860GT with the performance from the new valve-sprung engines. After much tweaking and developing, Ducati finally had a bike that could live up to the hype.

Not only did the 500 Sport Desmo appear with a twin down tube frame and Desmo heads, it also had superior handling and good brakes, qualities that became important in the reinvention of Ducati’s 500 Sport line.

The model that was shown off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco - CN: DM500B/502562 - was a red and white model that was described as being in "sound original condition." Expected bidding price for the 500 Sport was €3,000 - €4,000, which is about $3,800 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $758. Ouch!

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2002 Ducati 998R

2002 Ducati 998R

For all the classic Ducatis that were scheduled to be auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco, it’s nice to know that there were also modern examples waiting to be had. One of them was the 2002 Ducati 998R, a bike that was developed from the 2001 996R and comes in pretty limited availability.

Only 700 models of the 998R were built, and this particular model, CN: ZDMH200AA2B021283, was one of the bikes that was homologated to race specifications, allowing it to compete in the World Superbike Championship in 2001.

The 998R is powered by a 999 cc DOHC liquid-cooled Desmo V-twin engine that has been mated to a six-speed transmission. It carries a different crankcase from the standard 998 and came with a deep oil sump. It also had a more radical cam and an even more oversquare configuration with 104x58.8 mm bore and stroke.

The particular model auctioned in Monaco was number 635 of the 700 limited edition models. It only had 144 miles on its meter, and is considered being ’as-new’ condition. Bid price for this 2002 998R was expected to fetch about €6,000 - €8,000, which is around $7,700 - $10,400 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was a whopping $21,212. Someone wanted this bike bad!

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1984 Ducati 350 SL Pantah Desmo

1984 Ducati 350 SL Pantah Desmo

Ducati designer Fabio Taglioni once had an on-again, off-again relationship with Ducati. In the late 1970s, Taglioni found himself back in favor and produced another ground-breaking design, the belt-drive camshaft 500-cc V-twin Desmo Pantah, whose racing sibling, the TT2, would hand Ducati four Formula 2 world championships between 1981-84.

The success of Taglioni’s design was significantly smaller and quieter than the outgoing bevel-drive twins, as well as cheaper to build. When the engine was boosted to 600 cc in 1981’s 600SL, the model gained a better fairing and a hydraulic clutch.

The 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco featured a Ducati 350 SL Pantah Desmo, a rare 350cc iteration of the model range that was being offered in good original condition and came with a two-into-one exhaust. The red and yellow paint is particularly distinctive, as is its 350 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine that was mated to a five-speed transmission.

The bike came with an estimated bid price of $3,000-$4,000, but it was sold for $4,545.

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1976 Ducati 860 Corsa

1976 Ducati 860 Corsa

Some classic and historical bikes are really worth all the pretty pennies you can afford. This 1976 Ducati 860 Corsa is one of them.

Created in 1973 after Ducati elected to contest endurance races, which had no engine size restrictions, the 860 Corsa became one of the most competitive race bikes the Italian bike maker has ever built. To ensure that the bike carried as much wallop as it could have, Ducati bored the 750-cc engine to accept racing pistons from the 450 single. This resulted in an 864 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine that was mated to a five-speed transmission with an output of up to 90 horsepower at 8,200 rpm. With these racing modifications, in tow, the 860 Corsa was able to notch double victories at Barcelona’s 24-hour race at Montjuich Park.

The model that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco is a very clean example of a 1976 square-case 900 SS racer, with right hand gearshift, NCR-style fairing and the handsome original Imola fiberglass tank. It has Campagnolo alloy wheels, Marzocchi forks with the desirable center axle, adjustable rear Marzocchi shocks, a 2-into-1 competition exhaust and Dell’Orto 40-mm carburetors. It carries no race number, but the restoration work appears to have been recent and is in tip-top shape.

The expected auction price for the 860 Corsa was about €18,000 - €20,000, which is around $23,300 - $25,800 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $6,061.

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1970 Ducati 450 Desmo Corsa

1970 Ducati 450 Desmo Corsa

Before the 750 Super Sport V-twin and Paul Smart and Bruno Spaggiari’s amazing 1-2 at Imola in 1972, no Ducati bike could go as fast as the 450-cc Desmo Corsa.

The 450 Desmo Coras first appeared at Rimini in 1968, where it amazingly pulled 50 horsepower at 9,000 rpm. The 450 had twin plug ignition, larger valves, a 42-mm Dell’Orto carburetor, and a 10-to-1 compression ratio, reinforced swing arm and Fontana twin leading shoe front brake.

The rich racing history of the 450 Desmo Corsa is a true testament to its reputation as one of the fastest era bikes in the Italian bike maker’s history.

The bike that’s being offered is a well-prepared and unrestored Italian series racer that was once ridden by Nencioni. It’s been finished in red and white and features Borrani alloy rims, Dell’Orto SS1 carburettor, Marzocchi forks with a Fontana front brake, Veglia tachometer, and Menani handlebars.

This particular machine was also displayed at the Ducati factory museum and prominently featured in the official Ducati museum book. It comes with an attestation from NCR confirming it was race-prepared by Ducati with special racing components.

The bike was sold at the RM Auctions in Monaco for a price of €29,250, which is around $36,400 based on current exchange rates.

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1993 Ducati 900 Superlight II

1993 Ducati 900 Superlight II

When Ducati began using carbon fiber on their bikes, they predictably used it on a limited edition, single-seat Ducati 900 Super Sport. Built from 1992 to 1996 as the Ducati 900 Superlight, the bike used the aforementioned carbon fiber material on a number of its components, particularly the mudguards and the clutch cover.

Initially, the Italian bike maker wanted to build 500 models of the bike, but bumped that up to 900 pieces after incessant public demand. After the 900 Superlight enjoyed success in the market, Ducati built the Superlight II in 1993, replacing the composite wheels with Brembo units and adding a floating rear disc brakes setup. They also fitted in a powerful 904 cc V-twin SOHC Desmo engine that produced 73 horsepower and was mated to a six-speed transmission.

The Superlight II that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco was model no. 34 of the 1993 series. It came in original condition, had good paint, and is considered one of the rare super bikes that would find a nice home in a motorcycle collector’s garage.

The bike sold for €4,095 ($5,260), below the estimated auction price of €4,500 - €6,000 ($5,800 - $7,700).

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1973 Ducati 450 Desmo Scrambler

1973 Ducati 450 Desmo Scrambler

It’s hard to imagine that Ducati has been building bikes for as long as they have. But for all those years in production, you’re bound to get a number of models that have become classics in their own right.

Take the 1973 Ducati 450 Desmo Scrambler for example.

With the anticipation of Ducati’s desmodromic valve gear back in the late 60’s, coupled with the success and popularity of the Ducati Scrambler, it figured that the two would somehow be tied-up together to create a completely new bike. That’s when the Ducati 450 Desmo Scrambler was born.

With the technology being fitted into the bike, the 450 Desmo Scrambler became a must-have purchase for Ducati enthusiasts back in the day, in large part because of the bike’s impressive performance credentials, highlighted by a 16.6-second time through the quarter-mile. On top of its performance characteristics, the 450 Desmo Scrambler was also fitted with an individual speedometer and Veglia tachometer rather than the headlight-mounted unit sometimes seen on 250-cc and 350-cc models.

The model that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco carries the chassis number DM450S/466142. It’s an unrestored model in good condition with a two-tone, black-and-yellow finish with a 436 cc Desmo single engine mated to a five-speed transmission.

Bidding price for the bike was expected to hit €8,000-€10,000, which is around $10,400 - $13,000 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $12,121.

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1977 Ducati 900 S2

1977 Ducati 900 S2

The Ducati 900 S2 was built on the joint platform of the 900 Darmah SS and the 600SL Pantah, with the latter supplying the body work of the bike.

The reason for doing so centered on Ducati’s decision to rationalize its production lines at that time. To their credit, though, they still managed to make a bike that not only looked good, but performed up to the standards of its predecessors.

The Ducati 900 S2 is powered by an 864 cc SOHC Desmo V-twin engine that’s mated to a five-speed transmission. It was also offered with either electric or kick-start options, as well as being fitted with 40-mm Dell’Orto carburetors.

Aesthetically speaking, the 900 S2 was also the picture of attraction - the bike was given a bevy of color options, including bronze with yellow, orange and red stripes, or red and black.

The Ducati 900 S2 that was present at the 2012 RM Auctions is an original model, one that was once displayed in a museum. Expected bidding price for the bikes go for around €5,000 - €7,000, which is about $6,400 - $9,000 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $5,303.

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1980 Ducati TT Corsa Pantah

1980 Ducati TT Corsa Pantah

Back in 1980, the Ducati TT Corsa Pantah made headlines after it competed at the 1980 Italian National Junior Championship with four factory bikes built by no less than Franco Farne. The TT Corsa Pantah ended up winning five of seven races after being driven by Vanes Francini, Paolo Menchini and Guido Del Piano.

The bike’s red and yellow bodywork is only one of many stand-out qualities about the bike. For the TT Corsa Pantah, Farne used the 500SL frame and added a Marzoccchi racing suspension. Even the engine, a 583 cc SOHC Desmo V-tine single engine was capable of producing 70 horsepower at 9,800 rpm and mated to a five-speed transmission.

For this particular example, the seller has been on record saying that the bike was ridden by no less than Vanes Francini in the 1980 Italian Junior Series. It’s been tagged as in excellent condition, with red and yellow factory paintwork and unmarked fairing, Paioli front forks, oil cooler, Brembo brakes and adjustable rear shocks by Marzocchi are also part of the bike’s overall package.

Combine its history and current state, it’s no wonder why this TT Corsa Pantah was expected to fetch around €14,000 - €16,000, which is around $18,000 - $20,700 based on current exchange rates. Its actual purchase price at the auction was €11,700, or about $15,026 at the current rates. Ouch.

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1980 Ducati 350 Sport Desmo

1980 Ducati 350 Sport Desmo

Some would say that the Ducati 350 Sport Desmo, together with the 500 Sport Desmo, was a bike that vindicated Ducati, especially after its predecessors failed to capture the market’s imagination the way Ducati wanted them to.

Following in the reins of the disappointing GTL models, the 350 Sport Desmo featured a plethora of upgrades, including the addition of Borrani rims, Marzocchi forks, and Brembo brakes. On top of that, the bike also came with a 350 cc SOHC Desmo parallel-twin engine that was mated to a five-speed transmission.

The bike was successful enough that Ducati even launched the 500 Sport Desmo and the racing 500 Super Sport in 1977, marking a return to form that only Ducati could have pulled of.

The 350 Sport Desmo that was shown at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco fetched €3,218 ($4,100), a price that was right on par with its pre-auction range €3,000 - €4,000 ($3,800 - $5,200).

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2000 Ducati MHE900

2000 Ducati MHE900

As the brainchild of designer Pierre Terblanche, the Ducati MHE900 was born to commemorate Mike Hailwood’s remarkable comeback win at the Isle of Man TT in 1978. Essentially, the MHE900 is Ducati’s first attempt at E-Commerce, building 1,000 models of the bike and putting it up for sale on the Internet. As expected, the MHE900 was an immediate success, prompting Ducati to build another 1,000 numbered units.

In terms of design, the MHE900 comes with a retro styling that harkens back to the design of the 70’s. From the complicated tank and fairing to the dingle-sided steel swing-arm, the MHE900 is truly a bike that stands on its own two wheels. More than just its classic looks, the bike is also powered by an impressive powertrain in the form of a 904-cc, two-valve, air-cooled Desmo Super Sport engine.

The bike auctioned off at the RM Auctions in Monaco - Model No.3 of 2,000 - was about as new condition as any of the other models in existence. It’s been on a number of motor shows as a display bike and was even exhibited at the Ducati factory. Rest assured, this MHE900 is a bike that Ducati collectors would trip over their bids just to own.

Expected pricing for this bike was about €10,000 - €12,000, which is around $13,000 - $15,500 based on current exchange rates. Actual auction price was €12,870, or about $16,528 at the current rates.

More photos of the Ducati MHE900 Model No. 3 of 2,000 after the jump.

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NCR turns Ducati's Desmosedici RR into Millona 16

NCR turns Ducati’s Desmosedici RR into Millona 16

It is hard to believe that someone can take the Ducati Desmosedici RR and make it better, but it happened. This is the NCR Milona 16, a lightened, upgraded and implicit faster Ducati Desmosedici RR. We wouldn’t have believed it if the thing wouldn’t have recently been unveiled at the World Ducati Week at Misano.

The Italian tuning specialist has fitted the 200bhp MotoGP replica with a multitude of carbon fiber main parts such as the all-new frame and swingarm, rims, fuel tank, half-fairing, rear subframe, tail unit and front mudguard. All these, together with the titanium and aircraft-grade aluminum, reduce the bike’s dry weight to 319lbs (an impressive 71lbs less than what Ducati achieved).

Using performance Ohlins suspension and Brembo brakes, NCR’s M16 turns into a much sweeter ride. Although it doesn’t go significantly over 200bhp, which is the standard bike’s horsepower figure, the retuned engine is aimed at delivering a whole different rush across the powerband.

Claimed to be ‘world’s most exclusive motorcycle’, the NCR M16 will be built to order only and we don’t dare to think about the six-figure price.

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High concept: Ducati Desmosedici Trike

High concept: Ducati Desmosedici Trike

The Ducati Desmosedici Trike is one of those concepts that you know won’t ever make it to the streets – at least not in production form – but it can make a rider beg Ducati to consider this as an alternative to enlarge their lineup. The concept belongs to Nicolas Petit from Creil, France, a 25-year-old professional motorcycle mechanic with a soft spot for Ducatis. In his creation, he retains the rear end of the Ducati Desmosedici, but brings in a two-wheel front from whatever reason you can find in his project description:

"This project is a mix between a motorcycle and a street quad. The base is without its Desmosedici fork, the rear is slightly restyled. The ATV-type front is grafted directly on to the engine chassis – simple and effective, Spartan and light,”

To us, only the idea of a 200bhp trike makes our minds go in places they normally shouldn’t, but who cares…just take a look at this.

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Rendering: 2012 Ducati Desmosedici RR

Rendering: 2012 Ducati Desmosedici RR

Since MotoGP returns to 1000cc starting 2012, Ducati is thinking about creating a new Desmosedici RR, which will have to be sold in a limited run. This will supposedly be a carbon-framed model and also considering the significantly larger displacement engine, we can’t even dare thinking about the price of the new Desmo following the 2008 original one, which remains in history as one of the greatest race replicas to come out of the factory gates in Bologna. Remember: 197bhp/171kg!

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If looks could kill: Nicky Hayden publishes first Ducati GP10 photo!

If looks could kill: Nicky Hayden publishes first Ducati GP10 photo!

There’s a reason why manufacturers usually ban all cellphones from their R&D facilities and Ducati may have just learned their lesson after Marlboro Ducati rider Nicky Hayden took an iPhone shot of the 2010 Desmosedici GP10 MotoGP bike when recently visiting the Ducati factory.

Ouch, that surely ruined someone’s day, but not entirely as the photo only reveals larger vents in the side fairing. The change enhances engine cooling and helps Ducati meet MotoGP regulations, which for 2010 say that no more than 6 engines must last all 18 races. That apart, the bike doesn’t look much different from its predecessor, but we still have to wait long for the official unveiling and thank Nicky Hayden for this unexpected preamble.

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 Does Tom Cruise make the Ducati Desmosedici look better?

Does Tom Cruise make the Ducati Desmosedici look better?

When he’s not filming for the movie Knight and Day or flirting with Cameron Diaz on a Ducati Hypermotard during breaks on the set, Tom Cruise seems to enjoy riding his very own Ducati Desmosedici and make the front page of both tabloids and motorcycle magazines.

Being only 5’ 7” inch tall, the actor and first US owner of a Ducati Desmosedici seems to manage with the big Italian supersport motorcycle very well and still look cool along the way.

Looking at these pictures, we just have to ask: does Tom Cruise make the Ducati Desmosedici look better or is it the other way around?

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2009 Ducati Desmosedici RR

2009 Ducati Desmosedici RR

MotoGP has long inspired competing manufacturers to implement racing technologies on their road-going motorcycles, but nobody believed (although everybody thought at the idea at least once) that a MotoGP bike will ever be turned into a road-legal one and be sold to those willing to pay the big bucks. Ducati was the first, and currently only, to break the ice in 2007 with the Desmosedici RR, which was derived from the Desmosedici GP6 Grand Prix motorcycle, and in 2009 the world is still amazed of this even being possible, not to mention the bike’s evolution.

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Video: Fifth episode of Ducati D16RR Documentary

Video: Fifth episode of Ducati D16RR Documentary

Episode five of the Ducati Desmosedici Documentary enables all of us to understand how the engine of a race bike ended up powering the MotoGP replica that the Ducati Desmosedici RR, without a doubt, is.

See both videos after the break.

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Fourth episode of Ducati Desmosedici RR Documentary

Fourth episode of Ducati Desmosedici RR Documentary

Ducati has reserved episode four of their Desmosedici Documentary to tires, which are provided by Bridgestone and are called Battlax BT- 01. Specially developed for the Ducati Desmosedici RR, the tires are the closest ones in production to those found on Ducati MotoGP bikes such Bridgestone Firestone Europe Product Manager, Guido Podevyn explains.

See videos after the jump.

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Ducati Desmosedici RR – third episode of the series

Ducati Desmosedici RR – third episode of the series

After the first and second episodes of the Desmosedici RR series, through which the Italian company Ducati gives a detailed lowdown on its most exclusive motorcycle by illustrating the conception and development of the Desmosedici RR project in the words of the key people behind it, providing a not-to-be-missed tribute to the most esoteric of the Bologna-made machines, it is now the turn of Paolo Neviani.

Technical director of RIBA Composites, company that is specialized in composite materials, his role is to explain and widely present the reason why carbon fiber is used to manufacture the Desmosedici RR tail.

See videos after the jump.

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Second episode of Ducati Desmosedici RR documentary

Second episode of Ducati Desmosedici RR documentary

While the first episode of Ducati’s Desmosedici RR documentary presented the processes of tuning, testing and then tuning again the MotoGP replica before calling it done and ready to hit whatever the future owner wants, the second episode slips on the technical details path, a delight for all engineer ears out there.

It seems that Ducati has worked so much at this project that they wouldn’t want the world to consider it “just another one of those fast bikes” and simply admit that they are built on the track so they provide the kind of material presented at official presentations.

See videos after the jump.

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First episode of Ducati Desmosedici RR documentary

First episode of Ducati Desmosedici RR documentary

Ducati has just released the first episode of a design documentary about the legendary Ducati MotoGP replica. This is just the introduction so if it was aimed at determining us to eagerly wait for future episodes, it is a complete success.

See video after the jump.

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Ducati Monster developing into Desmosedici RR

Ducati Monster developing into Desmosedici RR

Realizing that the $72,500 asking price for the Ducati Desmosedici RR excludes him from the start, a French Ducati fan took matters into his own hands and turned his Monster SR4 into what appears to be a bulkier Desmosedici RR, but without the astonishingly high retail price. The passionate builder also took its time and photographed the bike during the different stages of development and this is how we got the pleasure to share these with you.

Although technically it remains as the Monster’s L-Twin was preferred over a 200 bhp V4 Desmosedici RR engine, the fiberglass fairing and gas tank, the windscreen and headlights as well as the fake underseat exhaust are all testimony of passionate work and detailed craftsmanship.

I reckon that copying isn’t the solution and that he could have gone for something original, but otherwise the guy wouldn’t have ridden a DesmoMonster and, apparently, that’s what he wished the most.

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Ducati NA announces additional units of the Desmosedici RR MotoGP replica

Ducati NA announces additional units of the Desmosedici RR MotoGP replica

Ducati North America has announced that additional units of the Desmosedici RR MotoGP replica will be produced and addressed to the market in cause.

So few lucky riders who remained with a bitter taste in their mouths after closing out of the ordering process now have the opportunity to get their hands on one of those pre-sold units which meanwhile became again available.

Press release after the jump

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