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Ducati Scrambler "Custom Rumble" has got four custom build finalists

Ducati Scrambler "Custom Rumble" has got four custom build finalists

The winner will travel to California, the land of the Scramblers

"Ducati Scrambler Custom Rumble" is an art competition organized by Ducati to find the most eye-catching customized Ducati Scrambler out there. In its 2nd edition, Ducati has anointed four finalists from four different categories to go head to head for ultimate victory. All 132 entries got voted on scramblerducati.com with no less than 200,000 votes were cast.

These finalists will get an opportunity to display their meticulous, passion-driven craftsmanship during World Ducati Week (WDW) - the world’s biggest gathering organized by Ducati from 20 to 22 July 2018 at Misano Adriatico for all motorcycle enthusiasts. And one winner will travel to California, the Scrambler’s backyard.

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Ducati's devil falls in the hands of Fred Krugger to work his witchcraft on it.

Ducati’s devil falls in the hands of Fred Krugger to work his witchcraft on it.

Calling it as The Thiverval, the Belgian magician has pushed evil boundaries here.

When Ducati rolled out the Diavel prototype for the first time out of the factory in 2010, one person who saw that chiselled rear exclaimed saying "Ignurànt comm’ al Diavel!" in Bolognese dialect. That means "Evil, like the devil!". The rest, as they say, is history.

Fast forward seven years and the Diavel still manages to rumble on the streets with aplomb and break necks, unlike anything. Now, Ducati has commissioned a Belgian custom builder Fred Krugger, one of planet earth’s highly acclaimed custom builder, to work his magic potion on the XDiavel S. The bike was showcased at the Bikers’ Classics at Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium, that was held on the first weekend of July 2017.

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Holographic Hammer Gives the Ducati Scrambler A Subtle Do-Over

Holographic Hammer Gives the Ducati Scrambler A Subtle Do-Over

French custom bike builder Holographic Hammer has unveiled the Ducati Scrambler “Hero 01”, a reimagined take on what the Scrambler ought to look like. It doesn’t have the all-encompassing changes you’d expect from a custom build, but for the purposes of keeping the spirit of the Scrambler intact whilst still making nips and tucks here and there, Holographic Hammer accomplished what it wanted to do with the Hero 01.

As I said, if you’re thinking about an overhauled Scrambler, the Hero 01 might disappoint you. Holographic Hammer’s work on the bike isn’t grounded on the belief that overwhelming changes needed to be made to make it look better than it already is.

Rather, the French builder went about giving the Scrambler a few tweaks to resemble those street racers from yesteryear. It removed close to 45 pounds by cleaning up the tail section by shortening it and taking out the rear mudguards. The standard two-up saddle of the Scrambler was also replaced with a one-up stitched seat, creating a more purposeful look that brings out more of that cafe racer DNA the original Scrambler.

A closer look at that section also reveals the presence of a Werkes USA shorty exhaust muffler and new forks from Cognito Moto. The belt covers were also taken out and the standard wheels were replaced with carbon fiber Rotobox versions that are probably the closest things to a posh upgrade over the standard Scrambler.
Up front, a more traditional headlight was installed, same with the handlebars, which now looks more natural with those leather-clad grips.

Flashy isn’t the best word to describe the Hero 01, but with the changes Holographic Hammer did to it, there’s no denying that we’re all looking at a more streamlined version of the cafe racer that imbibes the essence of what a daily ride should be.

Continue reading to read more about Holographic Hammer’s Ducati Scrambler Hero 01.

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Ducati and Pirelli Team Up To Introduce The SC-Rumble

Ducati and Pirelli Team Up To Introduce The SC-Rumble

’Ducatiand Pirelli have had a long standing relationship that has yielded fruitful results for both sides. To commemorate this bond forged out of steel and rubber, the two sides decided to commission a special edition Scrambler with the help of Vibrazioni Art Design. The result, as we see here, is the SC-Rumble.

The Ducati Scrambler was chosen as the bike for this unique project. Hardly a surprise since the bike has seemingly been the apple of Ducati’s eyes since it made its debut in early 2015. In keeping with the spirit of the Scrambler, Vibrazioni Art Design opted to keep the bike’s original essence as clean as possible. But that doesn’t mean work wasn’t done to accomplish the design studio’s goal of giving the bike a more “war-like personality.”

As you can see, there’s a hint of a Mad Max-style customization here, which seems appropriate considering all everyone’s talking about these days is the Mad Max movie that just came out.

One of the most important changes to the bike was a subtle one. You might not even notice it, but actually, Vibrazioni Art Design cut the factory frame of the Scrambler at the rear and all the original components were taken out in favor of recycled industrial sheet metal bins. It’s hard to realize it unless you’re keenly aware of the Scrambler’s parts catalog, but from the onset, there’s already a distinct change to the bike’s structure.

The same thing can be said on the top side of the bike where you’ll see a new, hand-shaped aluminum top fairing that carries with an eye-catching billet aluminum headlight, which itself received a smoked lens with a circular LED light inside that appears to have been inspired by the standard Scrambler set-up. It doesn’t do much to completely change the appearance of the S-C Rumble from the source material, but subtle changes like the finish of the component does the trick to a slight degree.

As far as aesthetic modifications go, one side of the gas tank prominently displays a rubber sheet that was laser inscribed on nitride rubber with the treat pattern of Pirelli’s MT-60 RS tires. The clearly identifiable nod to Ducati’s tire partner is complemented on the other side of the tank with a hand-painted Ducati Scrambler logo that.

Other relevant modifications by Vibrazioni Art Design include the new handlebars, which were apparently swiped off of the Ducati Streetfighter, and a new high exhaust and a hand-crafted silencer that’s based on the Termignoni aftermarket model.

The SC-Rumble made its public debut at the London Bike Shed last May 22, 2015 and is now scheduled to go to Biarritz, France where it will be participate at the “Wheels and Waves” show from June 11 to 14, 2015.

Continue reading to read more about the SC-Rumble.

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Ducati Thailand Cooks Up The Scrambler Dirt Track Concept

Ducati Thailand Cooks Up The Scrambler Dirt Track Concept

The Ducati Scrambler has just received a new custom treatment from an unlikely place: Ducati Thailand. The Italian bikemaker’s branch in the Southeast Asian nation is responsible for this custom Scrambler, aptly called the Dirt Track Concept.

If you were expecting a custom job that’s a little more subdued, this isn’t the bike for you. Everything about the Scrambler Dirt Track Concept screams different, right down to the brushed metal panels and the leather-clad side panels. Look a little closer and you’ll also see that the fuel cap has been CNC-machined to further emphasize the bike’s rugged look.

Did you also notice that the front and rear fenders are now gone? Turns out, you won’t have much use for them if you’re using a pair of massive Pirelli Scorpion Rally tires on the bike instead of the slim set of wheels used on the standard Scrambler.

Even the large, round headlight of the standard Scrambler was thrown out in favor of a flat front plate that has a smaller headlight peaking out from a hole in the middle of the plate. As far as custom modifications are concerned, this has to be one of the most significant alterations on the Dirt Track Concept because it completely changed the haughty, retro-inspired appearance of the standard Scrambler.

Overall, Ducati Thailand created an incredible custom iteration of the Scrambler. I’m not quite sure the changes are going to fly with Ducati purists, but rest assured, those with a more open mind towards customization will appreciate the dramatic changes made to this Scrambler.

Continue reading to read more about the Ducati Thailand’s Scramber Dirt Track Concept.

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Vyrus Offering Ducati Customization Program

Vyrus Offering Ducati Customization Program

Italian boutique bike brand Vyrus is back to its eccentric ways again. Having previously offered to turn any Honda CBR600RR into a Vyrus 986 M2, the company is now setting its sights on transforming old Ducatis into a Vyrus. What that means is still unclear, but judging from the company’s history, it’s safe to say that Vyrus has something special in store for these old Ducatis.

The process towards turning your old Ducati into a Vyrus is pretty straightforward, even if it could turn into a wallet-burning exercise. All you need to do is fill up a form and pretty much explain why you want to get the full Vyrus make-over on your Ducati. Sounds simple enough, right?

Once that’s done, Vyrus might test your patience a little bit, but as soon as it replies, you could be well on your way to scoring a truly one of a kind ride. That would be a real score and hopefully, you’ll send me some photos of your new ride once Vyrus sends it back to you.

Note: Photo is of the Vyrus 897 C3 4V.

Click past the jump to read more about Vyrus’ offer to turn your old Ducati into a customized Vyrus.

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Custom-Built Ducati Scramblers To Debut at Motor Bike Expo

Custom-Built Ducati Scramblers To Debut at Motor Bike Expo

The Ducati Scrambler has been a hot item in the bike world these days. With the bike’s popularity soaring, it was only fitting that Ducati presented the Scrambler in a totally different light at the upcoming Motor Bike Expo in Verona, Italy. With that in mind, the Italian bike maker decided to enlist the help of three of Italy’s best aftermarket companies: Deus Ex Machina, Officine Mermaid, and Mr Martini.

That, ladies and gentlemen, is what A-list casting looks like.

Each custom builder will be presenting three different iterations of the Scrambler based on the three variants of the bike. For its part, Ducati was clear on its instructions to the tree builders: do whatever you want with it. Naturally, the builders took that edict to heart.

Deus Ex Machina got the ball rolling by focusing on the Scrambler’s aluminum bodywork and working on adding a single-piece tail, number-plate support and a headlight inspired by speedway bikes. The bike also features an asymmetric mudguard and a number of repositioned equipment, including the filter within the frame, the disc brake and, the dedicated exhaust. The final piece of this puzzle was to give the bike an apt name, which Deus did by christening its creation “Hondo Grattan”, which is named after the horse that dominated on the Harold Park race track.

Next up was Mr. Martini, which opted to give the Scrambler an American-inspired design, turning the bike into an attractive cafe racer. Despite the evolutionary styling, the bike also has a slew of Scrambler details, including the high exhaust and the knobby tires, complementing the changes made to the nose fairing, the tail-piece, the exhaust, the foot peg, and the handlebar mountings. Appropriately enough, Mr. Martini decided to coin the nickname S.C.R for its creation. That’s an acronym for Scrambler Cafe Racer, the perfect name for a bike the embodies the qualities of both bike designs.

Finally, Officine Mermaid lived up to its reputation as a builder that makes the most of what it has. That’s exactly what it did with the its Scrambler, giving the bike a somewhat spartan, rough-and-tough look that imbibe the characteristics of the Ducati bike. It’s not the flashiest of bike builds, but that was intentionally done to give the Scrambler the look of a bike that’s been through a lot of wear and tear. From the paint-stripped fuel tank to the roughed up metal mudguards and the minimised exhaust, Officine Mermaid’s work on the Scrambler, dubbed “Scratch”, is the personification of a utilitarian build done exactly the way it should be.

The three Ducati Scrambler bikes will be in attendance at the Motor Bike Expo in Verona, Italy from January 23 to 25, 2015.

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1950 Ducati 60

1950 Ducati 60

Ducati’s line of Cucciolo motor bicycles were so successful that by 1950, the Italian bike maker had already sold over 200,000 units of the model. With the demand for the bike hitting fever pitch, Ducati decided to branch out from the Cucciolo and build a model that was developed from it.

Thus, the Ducati 60 Sport was born in March 1950.

Looking the part of those earlier design motorcycles, the 60 Sport was by no means a push-over model. While it was built in the mold of the Cucciolo, the 60 Sport carried its own 65 cc four-stroke OHV engine that was capable of hitting a top speed of 40 mph with a fuel tank capacity of 200 mpg.

The particular 60 Sport model that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco is one of the oldest real motorcycles that Ducati has ever built. With a company that has become one of the most famous motorcycle brands in the world, its easy to see how a model that comes with an
older restoration and a pleasing patina will fetch plenty of attention at the auction block.

The Ducati 60 Sport was expected to hit a bid price of around €1,500- €2,500, which is around $1,900 - $3,400 based on current exchange rates. It actually sold for €2,340, about $3,000 at the current exchange rates.

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Ducati Monster Art episode II – Logomania [w/video]

Ducati Monster Art episode II – Logomania [w/video]

Ducati has just introduced their 2010 Monster 796 and together with it a second episode of the Monster Art project. Called “Logomania”, this episode pays tribute to famous Ducati logos and colour schemes from the brand’s early days.

Ducati seems to know just how important it is for Monster owners to make a bike really theirs, so while last year they offered the posibility for riders to totally change the visual of their bikes with clip-on tanks, tail-pieces, fenders and bikini fairings, the Bologna company now makes sure everybody enjoys a factory customized model just like they would have ordered it to a custom painter themselves.

The whole idea behind the all-new Ducati Monster 796 is to increase the profit of the Monster lineup and the second Monster Art episode is just another way to help themselves achieve that. What’s best, owners love it. Click past the break for the Ducati Monster Logomania video as well as the list of color schemes available.

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Ducati ‘1026' Flying Tigers edition by DSC

Ducati ‘1026’ Flying Tigers edition by DSC

Inspired by the shark face nose art of World War II’s Flying Tigers, the three fighter squadrons of US volunteers that flew for the Chinese Air Force, Death Spray Custom in London have created what they like to call the Bite project.

This Ducati 996, which was most likely upgraded with a Fast By Ferracci 1026 Stroker Kit and now called ‘1096’, is the project’s pièce de résistance. Obviously, the paintjob is the coolest thing about it.

Ducati may not have thought at a “shark edition” for none of their superbikes, but DSC’s work could stand as a good source of inspiration if the idea ever strikes.

Photos © Neil Bridge

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Pics aplenty: Ducati Streetfighter gets Rizoma treatment

Pics aplenty: Ducati Streetfighter gets Rizoma treatment

Take a look at this gorgeous Ducati Streetfighter S! It was modified by performance parts distributor Motovation Accessories using mostly Rizoma parts and accessories found in their 2010 catalog. The bike showcases the quality products from rear sets to engine covers and features a custom paintjob applied by Southern Metal Customs in Austin, Texas.

Although this is not a radical project, we happen to like it a lot for looking a hell lot more aggressive than the stock Streetfighter S and much more expensive as well. Hit the jump to see the whole list of parts thrown at it.

Photo credit: Will Gibson

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Ducati RAD02 Imola café racer by Radical Ducati

Ducati RAD02 Imola café racer by Radical Ducati

In order to pay a tribute to the 750SS Imola, Ducati’s notorious sportbike from the 1970s, Spain-based Radical Ducati has created an absolutely gorgeous café racer, which was recently revealed. They call it the RAD02 Imola and it is built for track use, but we hear it can be homologated with a few tweaks.

The engine is a 900SSie unit with hot cams, while the chassis is that of a Monster S4R with 749S fully-adjustable forks and MV Agusta ride-height adjuster. Also note the asymmetric megaphone cans, which we happen to like a lot.

The Spanish Ducati builders are already taking orders and mention that the price depends on the exact specs. Still, considering the hours spent to achieve this kind of built quality, the Ducati RAD02 Imola café racer addresses to riders with deep pockets.

Find out more here.

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Brad Pitt takes new custom motorcycle to his garage

Brad Pitt takes new custom motorcycle to his garage

The fact that Hollywood star Brad Pitt is passionate to the bone about motorcycles couldn’t ever make the subject of a news, so much the less on this page, but here we bring to you the latest custom motorcycle that sees its way to Brad’s spacious garage.

Dubbed ‘Flash’, this café racer was designed and built by Californian-based custom motorcycle builder Shinya Kimura, who has taken a 1974 Ducati engine as the starting point for his latest special order.

Following the design meets functionality philosophy, the Japanese craftsman has come up with the unique idea of positioning the oil cooler next to the headlight, giving the bike an asymmetric face and, very likely, managing to be beyond all expectations.

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Gooichi 749 - when standard isn't enough

Gooichi 749 - when standard isn’t enough

It’s funny how a good looking chick can attract you attention and you end up writing a post about the bike that she’s sitting on. That’s the case here and, yes, you can put that blame on me!

This is actually a 2003 Ducati 749 that ended up in the right hands in 2004. The owner, which ’…can never leave anything stock’, then started to lower, lengthen and garnish the bike, leaving us wondering if we’d choose between it and the “other” attraction point in the pictures.

But let’s check out some details here. First of all, there’s the stretched swingarm, custom-built exhaust and the spoked wheels. These are features that we simply can’t get over, so we’ll leave the owner do the talking from here: ‘I wanted to go for an old school look, so we sprayed it hot rod black with solid red flake scallops, equipped with red and white pin stripes all around. I also designed a nice air ride kit for it, along with some carbon pieces and custom side-mount exhaust. For some this would be enough, but when things snowball around here, it never stops! I ended up making a one-off, 14 over aluminum tubular swingarm to house a custom fat spoked rim. We went with ‘Ride Wright Fat 50’ 18-inch wheels, with a 300 in the back, chrome spokes with black rims’.

By what we can see when we’re not looking at that hot chick (damn, these guys were inspired!) the riding position is similar to that of a drag bike, so let’s just hope that the adrenaline rush is similar too.

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Will Ducati build a V Rod competitor?

Will Ducati build a V Rod competitor?

We recently presented a rendering according to which the Triumph Rocket III could go RR and become the alternative for the Star VMAX and while that looked plausible, this Ducati concept designed by Luca Bar is simply mind blowing from where I’s sitting. Called D66, the Ducati custom motorcycle is so similar and yet totally different to the Harley-Davidson V Rod, it stands as the European alternative to a consecrated American muscle cruiser.

Now, the question is: would you consider buying this thing? Or let me rephrase that… Would you buy this thing over the V Rod if they would both cost pretty much the same?

Note that it allows for some serious customization.

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Ducati 1098 Senna tribute bike

Ducati 1098 Senna tribute bike

After the tragic death of Ayrton Senna in 1994, different series of Ducati and MV Agusta limited edition motorcycles were designed as a tribute to the three-time Formula 1 world champion. Now, we’ve come across custom-built Ducati 1098 Senna which reminds us of the famous racing driver and about its big passion for motorcycles, apart from the one for cars.

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Ducati Terra Mostro

Ducati Terra Mostro

No, these are not photoshopped photos. This is the real deal. And no, this is not a new model from Ducati.
This is the work of some guys from Overland Motorcycles, a Ducati based dual sport adventure bike.
Unfortunately, they don’t give out a lot of details but from what I can see, this is one seriously sweet bike. And that headlight is pretty slick.
Keep tuned for more (...)

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