Ducati Scooters Motorcycles

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KYMCO Signs On To Become Official Scooter Of Ducati Corse

KYMCO Signs On To Become Official Scooter Of Ducati Corse

Ducati Corse, the Italian motorcycle brand’s racing team division, has signed a partnership deal with KYMCO, making the latter the official scooter supplier of Ducati’s MotoGP and World Superbike squads.

As part of the arrangement between the two sides, KYMCO will be supplying a handful of its Agility R16 50 4T + scooters to Ducati Corse where they will presumably be used in the MotoGP and World Superbike paddocks. Apparently, these Agility R16 50 4T + scooters are also being treated to a Ducati makeover featuring rider-specific liveries being used by the team’s MotoGP and WSBK riders.

You’ll be able to tell the difference between the sets of Agility R16 50 4T + scooters that will be used in MotoGP and World Superbike. The Ducati MotoGP team will be using Agility R16 50 4T + scooters dressed in the team’s official red and white matte livery whereas the scooters that will be used by the Aruba.it Racing – Ducati Superbike team in the WSBK will be dressed up in the team’s famous red and black livery.

Unfortunately, KYMCO isn’t planning to put versions of these scooters for sale, even as limited editions. So if you we’re thinking of scoring any one of these KYMCO-scooters-dressed-up-as-Ducatis, you’re going to be out of luck.

Then again, if Ducati had its own line of scooters to begin with, it wouldn’t have the need to partner with a scooter company like KYMCO. But yeah, that’s an entirely different can of worms.

Continue reading to read more about Ducati’s new partnership with KYMCO

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Ducati CEO Opens The Door For Possible Scooter Model

Ducati CEO Opens The Door For Possible Scooter Model

To those of you who scoffed at the idea of Harley-Davidson venturing into the world of electric motorcycles with the LiveWire Concept, well, prepare yourselves for another bombshell. Ducati, builders of wicked Italian sports bikes, isn’t shutting the door on the possibility of building…a scooter. You guys ok? Did anybody faint?

This is no April’s fool joke, either. Ducati CEO Claudio Domenicali said as much, basically telling Moto.it that the thought of one day seeing a Ducati scooter isn’t as blasphemous as some people believe.

That said, Domenicali did coat his comments by saying that if Ducati does venture into the world of scooters, it’s going to have to do it while keeping the company’s core brand elements intact. Unless he’s trying to throw some shade on his statements, I’m guess that he’s talking about scooters that will carry Ducati’s renowned styling and performance characteristics and will be as desirable to consumers like any other Ducati machine.

That’s the first part of the equation. The other part is to make sure that a Ducati scooter will sell, which I don’t see the company having any problems accomplishing, especially in markets where small-displacement urban rides are in high-demand. That could mean anywhere from China, South America, India, and even Southeast Asia.

If Ducati wants to get into the scooter game, it’s got the resources to do so. Apparently, it also has the support of its CEO and that bodes well for the possibility of seeing Ducati scooters in the future.

Click "continue reading" to read more about Ducati CEO Claudio Domenicali’s belief that scooters have a place in Ducati.

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1965 Ducati Brio

1965 Ducati Brio

These days, Ducati scooters aren’t what you’d call the company’s bread-and-butter product. But there was a time when these little rockets were pretty popular in the market, and one that stood out was the Ducati Brio.

In an attempt to expand its market reach back in the 60’s, Ducati decided to dive into budget two-strokes with the intention of creating as many variants of this line as possible.

One model that was born in this era was the Ducati Brio. First released in 1963 with the 48 Brio, the 100 Brio followed a year later in 1964. The latter enjoyed tremendous success in its time, thanks to its 100 cc single-cylinder two-stroke, fan-cooled engine that was mated to a three-speed transmission.

The model that was sold at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco is as rare a Brio 100 as you can find. It’s in good condition considering that it’s unrestored and it was sold for €1,755 ($2,200), which is a tad below the expected auction price of €2,000 - €3,000, around $2,500 - $3,800 based on current exchange rates.

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Ducati Maxi-Scooter design

Ducati Maxi-Scooter design

Due to the fact that Ducati is likely to create an all-new maxi scooter, kind of in the style of Honda’s DN-01, designer Xavier Gordillo has created this incredibly accurate sketch revealing how the two-wheeler might just look. Published on the Spanish Solomoto30 website, the ‘Ducatone’ design features a trellis frame and a two-valved engine, possibly borrowed from the Monster 696 or even the 1100.

Given the aggressive lines and comfortable riding position, this anticipation looks like being close to what Ducati has in mind, but the DN-01 will still lack competitors a long time from now as there is no certitude related to the concept being approved.

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