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2020 Ducati Scrambler Icon Dark

2020 Ducati Scrambler Icon Dark

Ducati unveils its new Prince of Darkness

Ducati’s Scrambler line has proven popular with the masses, and the factory expands its footprint further with its new Icon Dark. The “Dark” brings all the usual Scrambler-tastic charms to the table along with a custom bent meant to give would-be customizers a gentle nudge down that homegrown-bike path. It rocks the same 73-horsepower, 803 cc L-twin as the rest of the mid-range Scramblers along with the usual electronics suite, but it takes a turn toward the Dark Side with ample blackout paint and a monochromatic finish on the sheet metal.

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2019 - 2020 Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled

2019 - 2020 Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled

Its Off-Roadiness Goes Beyond Simple Aesthetics

The Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled saw its first major update ahead of MY2019 after only two years on the market, and the new version has a handful of things to offer over and above the previous gen. It starts with the bones reinforced to better withstand the rigors of off-road riding and rally-style tires that are designed for same. Rideability and comfort was buffed along with the security system, and the electronics suite features an off-road-specific upgrade as well. Those are the broad strokes, but as ever, the devil is in the details, so let’s dive right in and start chasing them down.

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2019 - 2020 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

2019 - 2020 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

Now With More Power And More Flat-Track Attitude

Ducati’s Scrambler Full Throttle was among the Scrambler models brushed up for the 2019 model year, and the revised version brings even more flat-track attitude to the table. The paint was spruced up a bit, along with the saddle to give the “FT” a year-specific finish. It ain’t all about the looks though; new electronics and safety equipment further increases its value right along with its curb appeal.

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2018 - 2019 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport

2018 - 2019 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport

A Scrambler Even The Fiery-Eyed Pegdraggers Can Love

For MY2018, Ducati released the Scrambler 1100 Sport elevating the family line to a whole new level with some top-shelf suspension components and race-tastic livery meant to appeal primarily to the go-fast crowd. Much is shared with its big-bore siblings — chassis, engine and electronics — but the Sport endeavors to increase the line’s inclusivity by drawing in those fiery-eyed pegdraggers.

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2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon

2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon

Ducati Took Its Top-Selling Bike And Made It Better

Ducati has been rapidly expanding and refining its Scrambler lineup, and the “Icon” variant was on the receiving end of some of the latter. That’s right; the Icon took a beating from the buffhammer as part of Ducati’s “Joyvolution” initiative, and it rocks a new color to go with updated lights and reworked ergonomics for MY2019. The new safety electronics come off the top shelf, as does the Multimedia System that networks your bike and your smartphone for a host of new infotainment possibilities. There’s more, but as always, the devil is in the details, so let’s dive right into this second-generation Scrambler and see what else Ducati has cooking over there.

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2019 - 2020 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer

2019 - 2020 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer

One of Ducati’s Best Mid-Size Rides, Only Better

Ducati refined its Scrambler lineup ahead of MY2019, and the Café Racer benefits from a number of improvements. New graphics, a new seat, and old-school laced wheels buff curb appeal, but it ain’t all about the vanity. The factory upgraded rideability and safety as well. In other words, Duc took one of its best mid-size rides and made it even better.

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2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon

2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon

Modern equipment, revised riding ergonomics, new paint schemes and better safety tech

2014 was the year Ducati started rolling their Scrambler editions, and after almost half a decade, Scrambler is no longer just a model, but now it is a brand. Till today, Ducati has been making Scramblers which could have been abused, but it pleased the urban way and masses, and hence they became glorified street bikes.

And the most successful model is receiving a much-needed update for the year 2019 ‘Scrambler Joyvolution’. The Ducati Scrambler Icon – will now come with modern equipment, revised riding ergonomics, new paint schemes, and better safety tech to keep both wheels planted in all situations.

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2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

Maybe a Flat Tracker, Maybe A Scrambler? Not Really Either

Ducati’s popular Scrambler line saw its footprint expand significantly with the addition of a handful of new models that includes the flat track-tastic Full Throttle. There’s no denying that scrambler-style bikes are enjoying an uptick right along with flat track-style racing, so it makes perfect sense for Duc to bring these two worlds together in a bid to grab its slice of the market pie. Model-specific details are the garnish on the main dish that is the base Scrambler, and of course, the 75-horsepower, Desmodromic L-twin powerplant takes care of business for the “FT,” same as it does for the rest of the line. LED, USB and ABS tech factors into the fandanglery to make this a thoroughly modern ride, so without further ado, let’s dig in and see how Duc sets this ride apart from its brethren.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler Hashtag

2018 Ducati Scrambler Hashtag

The only production model to be sold online

If you think that Ducati made the Scramblers for entertaining the youth, you are absolutely right. But if you believe the Italians cannot entice them more than this, oh boy you are so wrong. Ducati has finally bowed down to the millennials who love doing everything through a screen. Planned out by the millennial interns at the Ducati offices, the firm has launched the most affordable Scrambler model adding to the already strong line-up of six models.

And it’s aptly called the Scrambler Hashtag. Yes, the #. What is even more brain tickling is the fact that Ducati is going to sell these bikes exclusively through a screen rather than on a showroom floor. But it isn’t as straightforward as your Amazon deliveries are and is currently made available only to the European streets.

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2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Icon

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Icon

A Snappy Commuter Or Your Weekend Fun Bike

The Ducati Scrambler family has been rapidly expanding since its inception — in both the displacement ranges and available styles — but the stalwart Icon remains largely the same into the 2018 model year. It brings the same street-wise spice to the table as ever, and it comes paired with the 803 cc L-twin that delivers its 75 ponies in an easy-to-manage powercurve. Ducati also expanded its palette a bit with the addition of the “Silver Ice” hue. Little else is changed for the ’18 season, but why in the world would Ducati change something that seems to be working so well and is of such a recent vintage? If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, right?

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Icon.

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2015 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Classic

2015 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Classic

Hooliganism And Devil-May-Care Attitude Is Standard Equipped

Ducati’s Scrambler lineup covers a range of looks and styles, but it’s the Classic that really ties into the original Scrambler circa the 1970s. It comes with Sugar White as one of the available colors — just like the original — and sports a tan finish on the seat for even more dated flavor. Performance is up to modern standards however; with 75 ponies in the paddock and Euro 4 emissions compliance, the Classic delivers contemporary operation to go with its somewhat dated aesthetic influences. The hooliganism and devil-may-care attitude comes as part of the standard equipment package.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Classis.

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2016 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

2016 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

Who Doesn’t Have Fun On A Scrambler?

The scrambler market is booming, and so far, Ducati is ahead of the curve with a full range of purpose-built Scrambler models. It added to the lineup in 2016 with its Scrambler Sixty2, a model that reflects what the factory calls modern pop culture, with a liberal dose of sixties, mid-size standard cruiser flavor blended in. Powered with a 399 cc L-twin, the Sixty2 isn’t a poser in a scrambler costume; it’s ready to rock and roll.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler Street Classic

2018 Ducati Scrambler Street Classic

Put A Monster Engine In A Scrambler And What Do You Get?

After its overseas debut last year in Abu Dhabi, Dubai and elsewhere, Ducati is bringing the Scrambler Street Classic to the U.S. market for the 2018 model year. The Street Classic borrows from the ’70s custom scene for its unique spin on the scrambler platform and an 803 cc L-twin that delivers 73 horsepower to maintain the same level of performance as the rest of the mid-size Scrambler family. ABS provides the only electronic safety equipment, but if you’re looking for techno-gadgetry, then you’re definitely looking at the wrong type of bike, no matter the manufacturer. Ducati continues to morph its Scrambler lineup in an attempt to get as much mileage as possible out of it, and who can blame them. The range has proven itself to be very popular with the masses and a blank canvas for personalization. Are they jumping the shark yet? Let’s find out.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Street Classic.

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2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled

The Differences, However Minor, Make All The Difference

Ducati’s Scrambler line grew yet again in the 2017 model year with the addition of the Café Racer and Desert Sled. The Scrambler range has proven to be a veritable mine of possibilities as Ducati capable model in the entire range, and the Café Racer, well, it comes set up to look cool in an urban environment. Both rides get the same 803 cc mill that powers the rest of the Scrambler variants along with much the same chassis, but the differences, however minor, make all the difference in the world.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler 1100

2018 Ducati Scrambler 1100

Getting Better With Each Incarnation

There can be little doubt that Ducati’s Scrambler line has been a success thus far, and after expanding the mid-displacement (803 cc) family downward last year with the 399 cc Sixty2, the factory decided to go the other direction with its Scrambler 1100 range. Larger, more powerful and arguably more mature, the 1100s bring to the table the same sassy style as their smaller siblings along with 86 grin-inducing ponies and an electronics suite (riding modes, TC, ABS) commensurate with its greater capabilities. In short, the Scrambler line is all growed up now and ready to swim in the deep end; or is it. Let’s investigate this new branch on the Scrambler family tree and judge for ourselves.

Continue reading for my look at the Ducati Scrambler 1100 and Scrambler 100 Special.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler Mach 2.0

2018 Ducati Scrambler Mach 2.0

Ducati’s Newest Addition To The Scrambler Stable

Ducati made some adjustments to its Scrambler lineup this year. The “Mach 2.0” moves in to help fill the void left by the departure of the Flat Track Pro and Urban Enduro but creates a niche of its own with a particularly nostalgia-inducing look meant to call to mind the 70s on the West Coast. Roland Sands Design in Los Angeles, California, drew on its vast experience as a custom bike builder on that very coast to dream up this variant on the Scrambler theme at Ducati’s request, and the result is ’pretty cool, man.’ The differences between the Scramblers can be subtle, though noticeable; but today I’m going to take a look at the Mach 2.0 and see what RSD switched up to set this ride apart from the rest of the range.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Mach 2.0.

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2016 Ducati Scrambler

2016 Ducati Scrambler

The 2015 model year saw four new Ducati products built for a rather niche market; the Scrambler family that includes the ’70s-themed Classic, the flat-track race inspired Urban Enduro, the Full Throttle which combines an amped-up, flat-track race look with an urban hooligan touch and the Icon, a basic, modernized version of a traditional scrambler that serves as a blank canvas for riders looking to make a statement.

Ducati treated us to another branch on the Scrambler family tree in 2016 with the Flat Track Pro, another oval-dirt tribute bike that takes the racing references to the Nth degree. So far, it seems the Scrambler family is popular with a younger demographic, and I have even heard old-school styled Scramblers referred to as Hipster bikes. It figures, considering the dual-purpose nature of the family that provides decent road performance and maintains the ability to access, shall we say, alternative routes? Today I want to take a look at these five models, and check out the various subtleties and nuances that make each one unique.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scramblers.

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2015 Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro

2015 Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro

The Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro is a modern motorcycle that deals great with the requirements of city riding, but also feels pretty comfortable on the open road.

As far as style is concerned, the Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro features a classy brown seat with a ribbed design, lined with technical fabrics, a big, round headlight protected by an old school grill and aluminum 10 spoke wheels that measure 3’’ x 18’’ up front and 5.5” x 17” at the rear.

The motorcycle is also equipped with a high mudguard made of plastic fibre, LED lights, an LCD dashboard and an off road handlebar with cross bar.

The Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro is propelled by an 803 cc, L-twin, Desmodromic distribution, 2 valves per cylinder, air cooled engine which generates a maximum output of 55 KW (75 Hp) at 8,250 rpm and 68 Nm (50 Lb-Ft) of torque at 5,750 Rpm.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro.

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1973 Ducati 450 Desmo Scrambler

1973 Ducati 450 Desmo Scrambler

It’s hard to imagine that Ducati has been building bikes for as long as they have. But for all those years in production, you’re bound to get a number of models that have become classics in their own right.

Take the 1973 Ducati 450 Desmo Scrambler for example.

With the anticipation of Ducati’s desmodromic valve gear back in the late 60’s, coupled with the success and popularity of the Ducati Scrambler, it figured that the two would somehow be tied-up together to create a completely new bike. That’s when the Ducati 450 Desmo Scrambler was born.

With the technology being fitted into the bike, the 450 Desmo Scrambler became a must-have purchase for Ducati enthusiasts back in the day, in large part because of the bike’s impressive performance credentials, highlighted by a 16.6-second time through the quarter-mile. On top of its performance characteristics, the 450 Desmo Scrambler was also fitted with an individual speedometer and Veglia tachometer rather than the headlight-mounted unit sometimes seen on 250-cc and 350-cc models.

The model that was auctioned off at the 2012 RM Auctions in Monaco carries the chassis number DM450S/466142. It’s an unrestored model in good condition with a two-tone, black-and-yellow finish with a 436 cc Desmo single engine mated to a five-speed transmission.

Bidding price for the bike was expected to hit €8,000-€10,000, which is around $10,400 - $13,000 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $12,121.

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1973 Ducati 450 Scrambler

1973 Ducati 450 Scrambler

Go back to the 60’s in Italy and ask what kind of motorcycle was in vogue back then. Chances are, a majority of the people you ask will say "Scramblers."

As one of the most popular wide-case single bikes at the time, the Ducati 450 Scrambler was, for all intents and purposes, a true road warrior on two wheels. It wasn’t intended to be used for off-road competition and in addition to the 450 version, it also came in 250 cc and 350 cc trims. The only reason why the 450 Scrambler didn’t carry a 500 cc engine was because the crank throw wouldn’t clear the gearbox.

Nevertheless, the 450 Scrambler still packed plenty of punch to go along with an impressive frame that included an extra gusset along the top tube like Bruno Spaggiari’s racer, a wider chain and sprocket, slightly longer Marzocchi forks, and a silencer that was changed in 1969 to the cut-off Silentium type.

The Ducati 450 Scrambler - CN: DM450S/467407 - that was auctioned off at the 2012 MTM auctions in Monaco remained in unrestored condition, complete with its original yellow painted body and alloy wheel rims. Expected bidding price for the bike ranged from €3,000-€4,000, which is around $3,900 - $5,200 based on current exchange rates. Actual selling price was $7,955. Well done!

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