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2016 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street 500 / Street 750

2016 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street 500 / Street 750

It’s a no-nonsense approach to a bar-hopping café racer

Powered by a Revolution V-twin engine, the Street 500 and 750 are premium Harley-Davidson even though they’re geared toward the budget-minded, entry-level crowd. Just because the price is low doesn’t mean they skimped on quality. The Street siblings come with a steel teardrop tank and fenders covered in the deep, rich color, and flawless finish that long ago made Harley-Davidson the benchmark for premium paint on a motorcycle. The cherry on top is the chrome tank badge — not a decal, as you might expect in an economy-priced bike, but a three-dimensional tank medallion — as Harley’s pledge to you that you are riding a premium quality machine.

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2017 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

2017 - 2020 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Harley’s Hot Little Urban Commuter

Traffic-carving performance wasn’t the first thing I thought of when hearing the name Harley-Davidson, but the MoCo started changing that perception with the new-in-2017 Street Rod 750. While it is, in fact, based on the Street 750, multiple changes in the setup and equipment turn it into another animal entirely. Shorter steering geometry, a more aggressive rider triangle and a more powerful engine come together in H-D’s decisive push into the sport-standard market.

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2015 Harley-Davidson Street 500

2015 Harley-Davidson Street 500

Striking a balance between tradition and innovation can be difficult and expensive for a motorcycle manufacturer, and given the recent strides in technology coupled with increasingly stringent EPA regulations, this has never been truer than it is today. Harley-Davidson proves, once again, that it is possible with the release of its Street 500, which borrows from the XL (Sportster) and earlier K-Model, with strong echoes of the Cafe Racer.

The Street 500 provides an entry-level bike for performance-minded and budget-conscious riders looking to break into the brand that has defined American-made motorcycles for generations, without breaking the bank as well. While it lacks the longer legs, comfort and cargo capacity of the cruisers and touring-bikes on the highway, it is perfectly suited as an around-town bike (read: barhopper), and the rider never has to feel like he is wrestling a WWE star when maneuvering at low speeds, looking for that elusive ’safe’ parking spot.

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