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2017 - 2019 Honda CBR1000RR SP

2017 - 2019 Honda CBR1000RR SP

Honda’s Flagship Literbike Has Less Weight, More Power And Even More Electronic Wizardry Than Ever Before

In 2017, Honda put plenty of “super” in its next-generation, 25th anniversary (of the CBR900RR) edition superbike line with the newly redesigned CBR1000RR SP. While the Fireblade name has long been associated with race-capable machines, that connection to the track has never been clearer than with this bike. Less weight, more power and even more electronic wizardry than ever before, Honda’s flagship literbike brings the pain for a lot less cheddar than some of their, shall we say, ambitious rides. (CoughRC213V-Scoughcough.)

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2017 - 2019 Honda CBR1000RR

2017 - 2019 Honda CBR1000RR

A Much Better CBR1000RR Than The CBR1000RR Has Ever Been

Honda carries its CBR1000RR superbike, a.k.a. ’Fireblade’, into 2019 with little in the way of changes from last year. That’s hardly surprising given the scope and scale of the revisions done prior to MY17 that brought us the newest gen of Honda’s Total Control initiative with a host of electronic goodies to help keep the 189-horsepower engine (10 more ponies than the previous gen) under control. It’s Honda’s first inline four-banger to run a throttle-by-wire induction control, and the factory piled on with Riding Modes, Wheelie Control and more to make the ’Blade serve as a model flagship for the affordable-supersport sector with plenty of influence from the racing department for the ’everyrider’.

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2014 - 2019 Honda CBR600RR

2014 - 2019 Honda CBR600RR

MotoGP-Inspired Race Replica

Honda’s latest generation of 600 cc, CBR supersports toes the family line with its race-winning blend of power and maneuverability all packed onto a MotoGP-inspired chassis. Much like the original CBR600RR that hit the streets back in ’03 and was built as a racebike replica, the current model features a strong engine along with a front suspension featuring Honda’s 41mm Big Piston Fork for superb handling and snappy action, plus MotoGP-inspired bodywork in a race-tested aerodynamic supersport design.

Continue reading for more my review of the Honda CBR600RR.

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2016 Honda RC213V-S

2016 Honda RC213V-S

Interest in race-replica models is beginning to wane in favor of the more public road-oriented naked bikes and streetfighters, but you’d never know it looking at the work Honda put into the RC213V-S.

The “S” is based on Honda’s RC213V factory racebike currently competing in the MotoGP circuit, and it is important to mention here that this is the bike that carried Honda to the Riders’, Constructors’ and Team Championships in both ’13 and ’14.

While this isn’t quite a straight-up racebike with turn signals, it’s a fairly faithful reproduction and is as close as you will find among the production bikes on the road today. Let’s face it — to unleash a 100-percent genuine racebike on the public would be irresponsible at best, and criminal at worst, so the factory had to nerf it just a little bit. These bikes are hand built by specially trained mechanics using model-specific tools at a rate of one unit per day, part of the reason for the limited-edition run. Join me while I see how close to that line the Red Riders dance with this awe-inspiring machine.

Continue reading for my review of the Honda RC213V-S.

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2015 Honda CBR1000RR

2015 Honda CBR1000RR

Overview
Inspired By A Champion.
No motorcycle connects rider, machine and road like a sportbike. The immediate acceleration, the chassis that feels like an extension of your own skeleton, the power, the handling—and the bigger the sportbike, the more intense the experience.
Honda’s CBR1000RR has long been the ultimate Superbike for experienced aficionados, and the 2015 CBR1000RR is really something special. First off, we’re celebrating Honda MotoGP rider Marc Marquez’s back-to-back World (...)

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Honda RC213V-S Receiving Strong Customer Interest

Honda RC213V-S Receiving Strong Customer Interest

Despite poor reactions when it first came out, the Honda RC213V-S appears to have attracted its fair share of customers. The Japanese company revealed to Asphalt and Rubber that reservations for the MotoGP-inspired street bike are coming in stronger than expected.

There’s still a little over a week left before the reservation windows close, but at this point, the company has already received well over 300 purchase reservations on the RC213V-S’s dedicated website, exceeding the 220 units Honda initially planned to build in its Hamamatsu factory in 2016. The company has since been forced to ramp up its preparations to accommodate around 250 units, but if reservations continue to pour in for the superbike, Honda might again have to increase the factory’s production capacity.

This is tremendous news for Honda and the RC213V-S, which didn’t have the best first impression when it was revealed that its power output would be limited to just 101 horsepower in the US because of EPA regulations and that it would cost a staggering $184,000, which is right around the price of a 2016 Audi R8 V10.

Turns outs, a lot of customers aren’t too worried about shelling out that much money on the RC213V-S. Here in the US, part of the requirements in reserving the bike is dropping a $50,000 deposit. These reservations aren’t considered outright sales, but those customers who shelled out the $50,000 deposit are more than likely to complete the sale as soon as the bikes are ready.

Whatever happens, Honda’s planning to close purchase reservations as soon as it hits the maximum production capacity on the superbike. If there are still those who are on the fence, now’s a good time make a decision.

Continue reading to learn more about the Honda RC213V-S.

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Honda Taking Early Orders For RC213V-S Superbike

In a move that should surprise no one, Honda has begun taking early orders for its controversial RC213V-S superbike at a confirmed price of €200,000 in the UK.

A quick visit to the bike’s dedicated microsite shows a message from Honda, indicating that anybody interested in purchasing the bike must fill out a form to become eligible for first dibs on the road-going version of its MotoGP machine. The company’s taking orders until September 30, 2015, giving prospective owners enough time to seriously consider whether spending that much money on a bike with less power than a Honda Fireblade is worth all the trouble.

It’s not unprecedented for a company to offer pre-orders for a product, especially if said product is generating enormous interest from the market. In some ways, the RC213V-s fits that criteria, although I’m not certain if that’s a good thing or a bad thing for the supposed superbike.

The highly anticipated machine generated a lot of shaky buzz when it was revealed that it only had 159 horsepower in the UK and Europe. To be fair, a sports kit could bump the output to as much as 219 horsepower. More startingly, the US market will only get 101 horsepower out of the same bike and because of EPA regulations, the aforementioned sports kit will not available in the US.

Honda also took a curious approach of charging UK customers in Euros because in its own words, it would help the company “deal with fluctuations in the market making the bike more expensive in certain markets at certain times”.

Should you be interested in buying the RC213V-S, you’re required to fill out the aforementioned form, although that still won’t guarantee you the bike. There’s still a lot of hoops and holes to go through, including a consultation with Honda and various other procedures that will determine whether an owner is fit to own the bike.

One final thing: Honda’s early order for the superbike only applies to the US, Europe, Japan, and Australia markets. Should you come from a market under the “others” category, Honda has made it clear that you can only ride the bike in closed courses. Oh, the bike also won’t have any warrant and all expenses incurred by its maintenance, including transportation fees, will be shouldered by the prospective owner.

In other words, purchasing the Honda RC213V-S is beginning to look more and more like a hassle than anything else. It’s a lot less powerful than we all thought and has a price tag that would put even some of today’s supercars to shame.

That’s not exactly the kind of bike you’d think is worth all the trouble.

Continue reading to read more about Honda’s early order option for the RC213V-S superbike.}
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Does The Japan-Spec Honda RC213V-S Only Have 70 Horsepower?

Does The Japan-Spec Honda RC213V-S Only Have 70 Horsepower?

The Honda RC213V-S has already been derided in a lot of markets all over the world, but I shudder to even think what the reception for the bike is going to be in its home country if the spec details of the bike in Japan are true. Apparently, the spec sheets on the dedicated website of the RC213V-S in Japan shows that the supposed road-version of its MotoGP bike will only get a whopping 70 horsepower.

That’s right. 70 horsepower!

I honestly don’t know if this is a joke or a typo. I’m really hoping that it’s the latter because I can’t even comprehend the thought of a bike being hyped as the closest thing to a MotoGP machine and then fall dramatically short of whatever expectations people may have when they hear “MotoGP” attached to a motorcycle.

Hearing that the US-spec RC213V-S would only get 101 horsepower on the stock model already had people in an uproar. Can you imagine what the reaction’s going to be if Japanese customers only get 70 horsepower on their RC213V-S units? I surely can’t.

Here’s where it really gets comical. The suggested retail price of the RC213V-S in Japan is a whopping 21.9 million yen, which is about $179,250. That’s not as high as the US price for the bike, but it’s still obscenely expensive for a bike that has the power equivalent of a small-displacement off-roader.

To it’s credit, Honda is offering the RC213V-S sports kit in Japan. That shoots the output of the bike up to a more understandable 215 horsepower, which is what you would’ve expected from a bike that supposedly carries MotoGP juices. Honda didn’t specifically say how much the sports kit will cost in Japan, but if you want to base it on other markets, the kit could retail for about $13,000.

And that’s on top of the actual cost of the bike. Yikes.

Continue reading to read more about the disappointing Honda RC213V-S.

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Honda RC213V-S To Make UK Debut At Goodwood Festival Of Speed

Honda RC213V-S To Make UK Debut At Goodwood Festival Of Speed

The Honda RC213V-S is set to make its debut in the UK at the 2015 Goodwood Festival of Speed on June 26, 2015. It’s the culmination of a harrowing two weeks for Honda’s superbike, which has come under fire for being a lot less powerful than most people thought it would be.

Whatever disappointments people may have of the RC213V-S, the bike continues to get a lot of publicity. That should bode well for Honda as it prepares the bike for its next public appearance at the Goodwood Festival of Speed.

The Japanese bike maker is pulling out all the stops to give the RC213V-S the proper UK debut. It even tabbed a trio of world-class riders, including reigning World Superbike champion Sylvain Guintoli, MotoGP rider Scott Redding, and Isle of Man TT Zero Challenge winner John McGuiness, to give the superbike a proper Goodwood welcome.

The RC213V-S should get its due attention at Goodwood, even though it didn’t get the kind of reaction it wanted when Honda revealed its full specifications. Reaction in the US was particularly bad when it was announced that the bike would only have 101 horsepower on tap, well short of the 159-horsepower output that will be available in other markets. Honda’s also offering a track-only kit that could bring up the output to 215 horsepower, but again, the US market will be shut out of that option.

But that’s neither here nor there because this is about the superbike’s highly anticipated debut across the pond where our buddies from that part of the world can get a first-hand look at it.

Continue reading to read more about the Honda RC213V-S’ UK debut at the 2015 Goodwood Festival of Speed.

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Did Honda Just File A Patent For the RC213V-S?

Did Honda Just File A Patent For the RC213V-S?

Much to our disappointment, Honda’s seemingly endless waiting game regarding a road version of its RC213V-S superbike seems to have no end in sight. We’re nowhere close to finding out whether or not Honda really has plans to build a production model of the concept we saw at the Milan Motorcycle Show last November 2014. That being said, new patents for the bike’s design have just surfaced and if these patents are what I think they are, then Honda’s probably giving serious thought to actually doing it.

I don’t want to get ahead of myself here, even though the thought of a road-going RC213V-S has been gnawing at my head since I saw the concept bike last November. But these patent images could mean something, even though the only thing Honda’s actually trying to patent is that small section at the back of the bike where the rear light is found. You’ll see it because it’s the one part of the bike that’s highlighted in gray.

So what could this mean with regards to a possible production version of the RC213V-S? Truth be told, I’m only speculating here, but I’m skeptical about Honda’s plans to green light production for the bike. Maybe it’ll change its mind in the future, but for now, these patent images are probably for that specific part of the bike and not necessarily a piece to the RC213V-S puzzle.

Honda’s probably using the concept as an example on what the specific part could look like and then turn around and use it on other models as components to their overall configuration. It’s not the most optimistic of assumptions, but that’s where I’m at right now.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m still clinging to whatever sliver of hope there is that Honda eventually green lights a production run for the RC213V-S. But without any kind of confirmation from the company itself, I’m not going out on this particular limb.

Continue reading to read more about Honda’s patent images of the RC213V-S.

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Marc Marquez Tabs Yamaha As Biggest MotoGP Threat

Marc Marquez Tabs Yamaha As Biggest MotoGP Threat

Trash-talking normally doesn’t happen in MotoGP, at least not to the extent that NASCAR does it. But MotoGP is still a popular sport with a global audience and the media plays its part in drumming up interest leading up to a race.

Even riders, whether consciously or not, contribute to the increasing media mileage by saying things that can be misconstrued as trash-talking. Take for example reigning MotoGP Champion Marc Marquez’s recent comments about which team he thinks is a real threat and which team he thinks is more of a pretender than anything else.

Speaking to MotoGP.com, Marquez busted out some bulletin board material by calling Yamaha as Honda’s biggest rival to the title and dropping the mike on Ducati as a “non-threat” to the championship, despite the team’s impressive showing in pre-season test sessions.

Apparently, the two-time defending champ isn’t ready to consider Ducati a real rival, telling the series’ official website that the Italian racing team essentially has a habit of shooting itself in the foot at crucial times in the season. Whether you agree with his statement or not is a whole different topic for another day but it does remind you of two words commonly said when a comment like this hits the wire.

Shots fired!

His words won’t sit well with the folks over at Ducati, that much I can tell you. The opening round of the 2015 MotoGP season will begin this weekend as Marquez begins his campaign to win the title for a third consecutive year at the Commercial Bank Grand Prix of Qatar.

For now, though, let the trash-talking begin.

Continue reading to read more about Marc Marquez’s comments about who he thinks is his real competition .

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Repsol Honda Reveals RC213V MotoGP Racer

Repsol Honda Reveals RC213V MotoGP Racer

Every other team in MotoGP is looking up to Honda these days. If they want to do anything to topple Marc Marquez’s march towards a third straight world championship, they’re going to have to do something about the new Honda RC213V.

The prototype of the bike was recently unveiled by the Repsol Honda team in Bali a month before the 2015 MotoGP season kicks off in Sepang, Malaysia. That explains the rather exotic location of the reveal, don’t you think?

The 2015 RC213V features a familiar-looking livery with Repsol retaining most of the real estate space on the bike, including the unmistakable orange color scheme, on account of its title sponsorhip of the team. Likewise, energy drink Red Bull is also returning as a team sponsor and this time around, the company has a larger sponsorship role on the team, hence the prominent logo placements on the front fender, the windshield, and the belly pan just underneath the tail.

Two-time defending world champion Marc Marquez and teammate Dani Pedrosa were on hand for the 241-horsepower bike’s debut. So here it is, ladies and gentlemen. The ride Marquez and Pedrosa will use this season as it attempts to re-assert its dominance in MotoGP.

Click past the jump to read more about the debut of the Honda RC213V after the jump.

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2015 Honda CBR1000RR SP Repsol Edition

2015 Honda CBR1000RR SP Repsol Edition

There will come a day when we look back fondly at the Honda CBR1000RR and remark about its extraordinary superbike capabilities. Fortunately, that time hasn’t arrived yet so we can still enjoy the CBR1000RR for all that it is worth. But what if Honda offered you the chance to own a special edition CBR1000RR that bears the colors and logos of Marc Marquez’s championship-winning ride from the 2014 MotoGP season. In a nutshell, that’s what the CBR1000RR Repsol Edition is all about.

The overall qualities of the Repsol Edition remains the same and true to its roots as a CBR1000RR. But special edition bike does have a few exclusive details, not the least of which is the detailed graphics and decals inspired by the two-time MotoGP world champion.

Whoever said you can’t enjoy the thrills of Marquez and Honda Repsol’s success in MotoGP must have forgotten that Honda’s well and truly capable of offering it without hesitation. The occasion also seems fit after the team once again dominated the 2014 season and with the new season coming closer and closer, the timing is right to bring the new Honda CBR1000RR Repsol Edition out from the shadows and into the spotlight.

Click past the jump to read more about the Honda CBR1000RR SP Repsol Edition.

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2015 Honda Interceptor

2015 Honda Interceptor

Like a bike that just can’t seem to escape the demands of the consumer, the Honda VFR800F Interceptor, or as its more simply known, the Interceptor, just can’t go quietly into the night. Once decommissioned in 2010, the Interceptor has since made a valiant return after its supposed successor, the VFR1200, didn’t capture the hearts and imaginations of consumers the way Honda would’ve wanted.

So Honda did what it needed to do; it brought back the Interceptor to appease its clients, and here we are. The bike looks like it never really left, having picked up where it left of to carry Honda’s V-4 engine mantle well into the future.

You could even say that the Interceptor is better than it’s ever been, presented as a refined middleweight sports tourer that perfectly encapsulates the true identity of Honda’s renowned acclaim in the segment.

So if you’re wondering why the Interceptor was axed in the first place, don’t spend too much time on it. The important thing to remember is that it’s back, better than ever before.

Click past the jump to read more about the Honda Interceptor.

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2014 Honda CBR650FA

2014 Honda CBR650FA

The Honda CBR650A continues to be a benchmark in its class. Sporting an attractive style, a wide range of sporty features and an agile handling, the Honda CBR650FA seems to have all it needs to make you fall in love with it from the first ride.

The bike weighs only 211 kg and it is built around a 649 cc, liquid cooled 4 stroke 16-valve DOHC Inline-4 engine with PGM-FI electronic fuel injection that cranks out 64 kW at 11,000rpm and 63 Nm of torque at 8,000 rpm. The engine is mated on a six speed gearbox with wet, multiplate clutch that returns a fuel consumption of 21 km/litre.

The Honda CBR650FA is also equipped with the company’s Ignition Security System (HISS) and the Combined Brake System (CBS) which actuates both front and rear brakes when the rear brake pedal or lever is engaged.

Hit the jump for more information on the Honda CBR650FA.

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