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Deus Ex Machina has come out with the Mad Max tribute on a Z900RS

Deus Ex Machina has come out with the Mad Max tribute on a Z900RS

Called the ’Goose’, this modern-retro makes you wet yourself

Kawasaki had already brought back the ethos of the famed Z1 of 1972 at the Tokyo International Motor Show with the Z900RS retro motorcycle. The same guys then gave it a headlamp cowl and dropped bars to get it running on the cafe-racer beeline.

When the Z900RS met the fans of the 1979 MadMax original movie, who also happen to be the top custom builders from the land down under, a tribute to Jim ‘Goose’ aka best friend of ‘Max’ was in order. Goose rode on his modded 1977 Kawasaki KZ1000 having a huge fairing upfront supplied by the now-defunct Melbourne-based company La Parisienne.

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Harley Softail Breakout vs the Vulcan 900 Custom

Harley Softail Breakout vs the Vulcan 900 Custom

Rigid-looking frames are nothing new, and many manufacturers have followed Harley-Davidson into this cruiser/dragster sub-genre. Kawasaki is one such competitor, and its entry for the 2015 model year is the Vulcan 900 Custom. Since it so closely resembles the H-D Softail Breakout, I wanted to see how these two stacked up against each other. Let’s take a look, shall we?

Continue reading for my comparison of the Softail Breakout versus the Vulcan 900 Custom.

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Studio Motor Gives Us The Kawasaki Versys 650 Scrambler

Studio Motor Gives Us The Kawasaki Versys 650 Scrambler

Not a lot of people may know this, but Indonesia is home to some of the best motorcycle builders in the world. That’s especially true for Studio Motor, which has given us past masterpieces like the Harley-Davidson Softail Rebellion, the Harley-Davidson Sportster Warrior, and most recently, the Kawasaki Versys 650 Scrambler Temper.

The Versys 650 Scrambler Temper really is something else. I must say, a big chunk of the credit goes to Danny Aryianto who spearheaded this beautiful creation, turning what is already an impressive-looking Versys 650 into a bonafide scrambler that can rock any road it travels on. And if you’ve ever been to Indonesia, that particular skill from a motorcycle will come in very handy.

Aryianto and his crew at Studio Motor actually kept most of the Versys 650’s mechanicals intact. The rolling chassis remains the same and it’s quite obvious by the road stance of the bike. It’s in the bike’s aesthetics where we see the difference, particularly the offset rear shock absorber - a signature design by the Versys - which has been hidden to underscore the swooping changes in the aesthetics of the bike. This kind of aftermarket bravado is typical of Studio Motor so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the custom bike shop made the change at the expense of reconfiguring one of the most noticeable elements of the Versys 650.

Studio Motor didn’t just stop there, either. Most of the body panels were also removed, revealing the bike’s inner guts for all to see. That’s a hat tip to the classic Scrambler look and it works perfectly on the Versys 650. Likewise, the two OEM fenders were removed and replaced with custom-crafted ones that are less aggressive-looking and more in tune with the whole design language of the Tremor. The rear fender, in particular, is smaller than the original, extending with subtlety from the ribbed custom seat.

The front end of the bike offers yet another sign of Studio Motor’s comprehensive style customization of the Versys 650. The unmistakable front end of the original Versys 650 was taken apart in favor of a more classic Scrambler look, complete with round headlights and simpler off-road bars that rids itself of the OEM mirrors that extending outward like a sore thumb. In fact, the Tremor doesn’t have any mirrors at all, which might not be the best idea.

Overall, Studio Motor hit all the right notes with this custom project. It kind of makes you wonder why Kawasaki doesn’t just build its own scrambler, especially if it can come up with something that looks as spiffy as the Versys 650 Tremor.

Continue reading to read more about Studio Motor’s Kawasaki Versys 650 Tremor.

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The French Connection by Deus Customs

The French Connection by Deus Customs

Deus Customs is a motorcycle tuning company based in Australia that specializes in building custom bikes for custom people. One of their recent creations is the French Connection, a custom-made bike that was built and designed specifically for Moto GP1 star, Randy De Puniet.

For this bike, De Puniet wanted something that could pass as a middleweight, 2-up, twin-type that is versatile enough to hit the city streets while having enough durability to last during those out-of-town trips.

To get the bike up-to-character, Deus painted the Kawasaki W650-based French Connection bike with an orange, white, and black paint finish. The tuning firm also dressed up the rims and hubs in a black satin film while fitting in a vintage style headlight that supports the tachometer.

Deus also tweaked the bike’s performance set-up, working around its 649cc engine and putting new K&N filters and a custom 2-into-2 system. The company also modified the forks before dressing up the front and rear guards in a pair of Firestone tires.

All in all, we think that Randy De Puniet enjoyed his new custom bike. As far as we’re concerned, the name by itself - the French Connection - is enough for us to notice it.

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Kawasaki Z900 gets the magic touch

Kawasaki Z900 gets the magic touch

Turning a classic inline-four Japanese motorcycle into a modern custom doesn’t sound like the easiest task, but the results can be truly satisfying. Just take a look at this 1976 Kawasaki Z900 that Spanish custom builder La Perra Bikes recently finished.

At its base, the bike remains the same, so the low bars and black wire wheels, Ohlins inverted forks, Brembo radial brake calipers as well as the wavy Galfer brake rotors help bring it back through the living. Once there, the chopped exhaust should make sure everyone hears it roar.

All in all, this looks like a short way from classic to custom, but it is the black and gold combination that really makes a striking difference.

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Kawasaki Z2 by Sanctuary

Kawasaki Z2 by Sanctuary

The Z2/750RS was one of Kawasaki’s highly appreciated inline-four nakeds and made the subject of many customization projects over the years and, as we have recently come to find, it can still work its magic. Modified by the Kouga branch of the Sanctuary workshop, this precise exemplar apparently retains most of its original features, but it is brought up to date especially in what the chassis is concerned.

Now built around a powdercoated and reinforced frame and featuring Yamaha XJR1200 suspension as well as Brembo brakes, the upgraded Kawi Z2 should handle much better and come to a hault almost instantaneously. Also, thanks to the Yoshimura-tuned Mikuni TMR-MJN38 carburetion and Nitro Racing exhaust with titanium silencers, the blueprinted and balanced engine that originally developed 69bhp at 9000rpm now responds better to acceleration and sounds racy.

Overall, this is a clean looking bike which, despite having a few good years on its back, only needed a quick upgrade in order to keep up with its modern siblings from most points of view. That’s why we love Japanese bikes so much.

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2010 Kawasaki Z1000 by Roaring Toyz

2010 Kawasaki Z1000 by Roaring Toyz

The 2010 Kawasaki Z1000 is already one of the best Japanese nakeds around, but ways to make it better are always found either by riders individually or by tuners. These lasts have the habit of developing entire upgrade kits that set the bike miles away from its original state of new product that has just come out the factory gates.

Take the 2010 Roaring Toyz Kawasaki Z1000 case for example. The bike gets a set of Performance Machine wheels (17-inch front, 18-inch rear), 240-section rear tire, a custom-built braced swingarm and Brocks 4-2-1 exhaust, just to mention some of its most impressive new features.

The gold/silver paintjob does help at setting the bike apart from its standard siblings, but what we like the most about this project is the fact that it looks like that’s just the way Kawi did it in the first place. This is really one of those bikes that people see and ask “what is stock and what is aftermarket about it?” Click past the break to find out.

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1977 Billetproof Customs KZ 400 Café Racer

1977 Billetproof Customs KZ 400 Café Racer

1977 Billetproof Customs KZ 400 Café Racer

Take a look at this 1977 Kawasaki KZ400 in the small photo and at the veritable café racer above only to find that there are little similarities, enough to have you say we’re talking about two different bikes. But it is precisely the ease of transforming an old Japanese bike into a café racer what impresses us the most about this project.

Billetproof Customs bought the bike for $300. The reliable engine still ran good, so it was worth stripping everything off of it in order to see what can be done from a fresh start. Said and done. They started with the frame, which was seriously modified and then they built the wheels and brought in lowered front shocks and custom shortened rear shocks. The old Kawi was now 2 inches lower and got itself a much more aggressive stance also thanks to the shortened clubman bars.

The bodywork was next. A refurbished 1979 Suzuki GT 500 fuel tank found its place on top of the frame together with the one-piece seat and rear tail section, which were custom made out of fiberglass by the builder. The reconditioned engine was now ready to go back on and it was fed through a single carb instead of its original dual ones. Also, it now features custom made and wrapped exhaust pipes and so they obtained a retro look instead of the classy one that chrome would have given the bike.

After adding a disc front brake and custom drilling the rear drum as well as hiding the battery under the tail section, the bike was ready for painting. Like all the above mentioned, this was done by the manufacturer and olive drab was the color of choice. Other nice details worth mentioning are the headlight, bar end mirrors and speedo, taillight as well as the custom stitched seat in between. Hit the jump for a multitude of photos.

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Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R rat bike

Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R rat bike

Nobody would want to see an “Altered Rat” unless it’s the Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R special owned by Brian Johnson, who is a big fan of the rat bike style. The bike was done in the Altered Chrome Garage using the company’s own parts and it is the only one of its kind that we’ve seen so far.

We have to admit that this is truly an original idea and, in the end, what’s not to like about a wolf in sheep’s clothing.

This thing is like a rolling advert for junkyards, but don’t be fooled in thinking it’s a piece of crap. Imagine seeing this thing pass next to you doing 150mph.

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Kawasaki Zephyr 1100 by Moriwaki

Kawasaki Zephyr 1100 by Moriwaki

While Kawasaki discontinued their 1990s Zephyr 1100, the bike remains popular among those with an affinity for large-displacement nakeds and it even got a 2010 makeover from the Japanese tuner Moriwaki. The bike looks gorgeous with the dark blue/yellow color scheme, but this is one of those cases when the “more than meets the eye” part is what really makes all the difference.

This thing is powered by a big bore 1258cc inline-four engine breathing out through a hand made exhaust system and developing a decent 110bhp. While bringing in a new clutch and suspension, Moriwaki also fitted their latest idea for a Kawi Zephyr with a computer designed, aluminum alloy swingarm in order to stiffen up the rear end as well as make possible the use of a 180 section rear wheel and tire.

Is it just us or this is the best looking Kawasaki Zephyr around?

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2010 Kawasaki Vulcan 900

2010 Kawasaki Vulcan 900

The 2010 Kawasaki Vulcan 900 model range takes the best from the world of cruisers and adjusts it to match the size, experience and demands of riders who are just starting out. Each of the three models, Classic, Classic LT and Custom are set to offer a different kind of riding experience and the new Special Edition version derived from the Custom model follows the trend towards Dark Custom motorcycles that Harley-Davidson started.

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Kawazuki by Icon

Kawazuki by Icon

Apart from providing motorcycle gear for speed junkies, Icon also like to get their hands dirty from time to time while customizing, obviously, Japanese motorcycles. One of their latest creations is actually called the Kawazuki, originally a 1979 Kawasaki KZ1000 with an ordinary destiny, but which ended up with a modified frame (mounts for rearsets included), a Suzuki SV1000 monoshock and front end as well as with a ’92 GSX-R750 swingarm and rear wheel.

The original engine was fitted with a 1075cc Wiseco big bore kit so that this classic would keep up with modern bikes, but it is a pleasure just to look at it.

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Deus Ex Machina's Sacred Cow bobber

Deus Ex Machina’s Sacred Cow bobber

Kawasaki W650

Turning a veritable roadster such as the Kawasaki W650 into a unique hardtail chopper can prove very challenging as builders must sacrifice comfort for style and it is this precise case that we’re witnessing here with the Deus Sacred Cow bobber.

We happen to like this Deus Ex Machina creation very much and we have come to find that it was built according to the strict requirements of New York motorcyclist and motorcycle design company owner Billy Joel, who has considered a hardtail frame kit, 21" front wheel, spring-mounted saddle, handmade tank and cleaned up looks as being the most appropriate means of transformation.

Because good looks must always be backed by engine performance, this custom bike’s parallel-twin gets a 720cc big bore kit. Also considering the weight loss, the Deus Sacred Cow bobber should be significantly zippier than the stock bike. This is what the happy Brooklyn customer eagerly waits to find out as the bike is on its way towards him as we speak. Meanwhile, Billy Joel has given an interview to Hell for Leather Magazine, so read it here to find out more about his passion for motorcycles and about what he plans to do with his latest ride.

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Kawasaki Z 750 B by WrenchMonkees makes rust fashionable

Kawasaki Z 750 B by WrenchMonkees makes rust fashionable

Unique ideas keep custom motorcycle builders such as Copenhagen-based Wrenchmokees apart from the crowd and while the company has tricked out Kawasakis Z 750 B before, they haven’t done a better job than this one right here. And the best part about it is that they only needed to put their signature on that rusted fuel tank and initiate a new approach towards corrosion, somehow make it fashionable.

It may sound crazy, especially because this is not a rat bike, but we cannot say it is ugly. The WM customization process mainly consists in rebuilding a bike’s old engine, painting it in heat resistant paint, changing the exhaust and bringing in performance air filters, while the chassis is modified for a sportier look and different parts made in-house are added.

Kawasaki Z 750 B by WrenchMonkees

The bike gets all that, but the one and only part that caught our attention is that rusted gas tank. For instance, they also offer a candy metal flake version, which we cannot like as much. Oh, by the way, rusted parts make any motorcycle a “work in progress,” so let’s hope the owner will still have a tank to put gas in after several years.

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Ridiculous Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R chopper

Ridiculous Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R chopper

Kawasaki has never ever thought at manufacturing a Ninja chopper, but it seems that this owner has taken measures by itself and came up with this bad idea for a chopper. I guess I never really considered how ridiculous a ZX-6R with longer forks and sidestand can look.

But looking at the bright side, it is now much easier to pull out a wheelie; all you really have to do is try to get moving.

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Kawasaki Gpz 1100 by WrenchMonkees

Kawasaki Gpz 1100 by WrenchMonkees

The Gpz 1100 was one of Kawasaki’s first sport-touring motorcycles, but there’s little left of this particular unit after ending up in the hands of custom motorcycle builder WrenchMonkees. Turned into a naked powered by now a 125 hp Gpz engine upgraded with an 1170cc Wiseco piston kit and featuring more tweaks than you would imagine, this might very well reflect how things get done in Denmark.

With sports wheels and suspensions, this roadster should know how to bring riders the most benefits from that powerful Japanese inline-four engine, so in the end it is all a matter of style, which is quite unique, especially if we look at the backend. This is contoured by the WM rearframe and characterized by a flat seat and custom back fender as well as by the LED taillight. Up front, there’s also a WM fender, while the fork wraps make it look like one of those Mad Max bikes. In between, there’s a stylish Zephyr fuel tank and a very enthusiastic rider. Please read the specs after the break.

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Kawasaki Z1000 A café racer by WrenchMonkees

Kawasaki Z1000 A café racer by WrenchMonkees

Copenhagen-based custom motorcycle builder WrenchMonkees brings Japanese power to the world of café racers with their Monkee number 2. Although it started life as a Kawasaki Z1000 A, there’s little left of the original bike, not even the engine. This was replaced with that of a Z1000 J model, which was upgraded to around 110-115 hp by fitting a 1075cc Wiseco piston kit.

The café racer image was achieved with the use of a Norton fuel tank and a Ducati Monster headlight while the rest of the body parts, but also the mufflers, LED rear light and even the custom paint wear the WM fingerprint.

We can’t help but think about the uncomfortable riding position, read the specs again and appreciate the fact that it has a big engine as well as a retro look until finally reaching to the conclusion that this may very well be something that our favorite Hollywood star would ride to the studios everyday.

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Kawasaki Z1000 A by WrenchMonkees

Kawasaki Z1000 A by WrenchMonkees

WrenchMonkees clearly has a passion for bringing old classic roadsters back to a new kind of glory by using a few tricks that they have in their sleeves. For instance, this Kawasaki Z1000 A now benefits of 105 hp as a result of installing a 1075cc Wiseco piston kit to the original motor, which is now fed by Z1000 J carburetors and filters air using K&N pieces.

The Copenhagen-based custom builder has the tendency to turn every bike into a café racer and this one looks, sounds and we reckon it performs as one too. Most likely, the sports bike front suspension and custom rear shocks also bring a major contribution to what looks to be a very angry piece of machinery.

Stylistically, the WM fingerprint is left by the all-new tail and seat as well as by the custom paintjob. Ride this bike like you stole it and people will believe you actually did simply because they would have probably done the same thing if they were you.

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The other Kawasaki Z 750 B by WrenchMonkees

The other Kawasaki Z 750 B by WrenchMonkees

It seems the Kawasaki Z 750 B is a great bike to work on for Copenhagen-based custom builder WrenchMonkees as this is not the first time we write about their creations based on this particular Japanese bike. In this case, they choose bobber-like wheels as a first step in turning classic into custom while the unique rear frame and seat leave the unmistakable WM signature.

The original engine was kept, but it is now restored and covered in black heat resistant paint. It develops approximately 50 hp and breaths through K&N filters and WM megatron mufflers, this time not covered in exhaust heat wrap.

Clearly, style beats performance on this custom motorcycle and the final touch is given by the in-house rear fender and clean custom paint. Those small head and tail lights are supposed to make the wheels look even fatter and the thing is that this is one of those bikes that you rediscover each and every time you look at it. Specs are attached after the break.

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Kawasaki Z 750 B by WrenchMonkees

Kawasaki Z 750 B by WrenchMonkees

The WrenchMonkees team gave a unique touch to this late 1970s Kawasaki Z 750 B not just by rebuilding the engine and adding their very own megatron mufflers, but by turning classic into custom using what we begin to consider the WM routine. This implies a new rearframe and fender which help at giving each of their bikes a unique look, while the aluminum battery box helps at meeting the customer’s requirements.

Good looks are part of just a point met on the Copenhagen-based builder’s check list. Because comfort is another one, this bike gets WM seat, footpegs and also handlebar and grips. The riding position looks quite natural and the bike is overall exclusive in its simplicity. You won’t find any wires hanging on for dear life on their way to the WM headlight and taillight and we have to appreciate that, just as we cannot complain about the WM heat resistant custom paint. This, together with the 19-inch cast alloy wheels, makes a Kawasaki Z750 B look like something that Brad Pitt would ride.

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Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14 Egyptian livery

Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14 Egyptian livery

This Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14 has undergone a serious transformation so that it will delight an owner clearly passionate of Egypt’s glory days and, of course, motorcycling. Ancient looks meet modern technology on this not to be missed long haul sports motorcycle spotted on the streets of Australia.

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2007 Kawasaki Vulcan 1600 Mean Streak

2007 Kawasaki Vulcan 1600 Mean Streak

The mean streets demand a motorcycle with enough attitude to stand-out from the crowd. Kawasaki kept this in mind when designing the Vulcan 1600 Mean Streak. Take a closer look, and it will quickly becomes obvious that swinging a leg over this cruiser will open a new world of torque, acceleration, and earn the admiring looks of other riders.

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