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2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone
- image 780466
  • Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone
  • Year:
    2018
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    V-Twin
  • Displacement:
    744 cc
  • Price:
    8490
  • Price:

Eclectic And Essential, Says The Factory

Moto Guzzi’s V7 family expands yet again with the V7 III series that sees the popular “Stone” model carry over from the outgoing V7 II generation. The new Stone carries itself with the same subtle darkness that made its predecessor so popular along with many of the genetic markers normally associated with the Moto Guzzi brand. Foremost among these is the transverse-mount V-twin powerplant that protrudes conspicuously from both sides of the bike, and of course, the 52 ponies that come along with it. The fuel tank strikes a classic shape as well, and the rest of the design falls right into line with plenty of yummy-goodness under the hood in the ABS and traction control features. There’s more to be found, so let’s dig into this little Italian gem with its not-so-polished moniker.

See our review of the Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone.

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2017 - 2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Special

2017 - 2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Special

Sporting DNA That Harkens Back To The V750 S3 Of 1975

Moto Guzzi carries its “Special” into 2018 after the introduction last year of the V7 III family that brought in a new engine and all-new frame. This is the third generation of ’Guzzi’s venerable V7 line, and the Special sports DNA that goes all the way back to the V750 S3 of ’75 in a conspicuous display of its deep roots, but keeps things purely modern where it counts. A new V-twin delivers ample ponies with that distinctive rumble and transverse orientation you’d expect with a traction control feature to help you keep it under control while accelerating. ABS overwatch for safe braking makes the Special suitable for entry-level riders and fun for experienced ones. Today I’m going to dig into this classy little standard that hails from the era of my childhood, and I gotta’ say, I’ve been looking forward to this particular ’Guzzi, so let’s get started.

Continue reading for my review of the Moto Guzzi V7 III Special.

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2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Milano

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Milano

This Is A Real Retro From A Company That Knows Retro

’Guzzi expands its almost-new V7 III footprint here in its sophomore year with a trio of new models that double the number of units in the range with the Milano as a sort of classic-custom tribute. The Milano bears some of the same seventies-tastic touches as the V7 III Special, but in a more understated way that clearly has no qualms about adopting modern tech, as evidenced by the cast rims instead of laced. Twin clocks and a faux tuck-and-roll saddle help the Milano visually hit the target era, but the ABS and traction control feature makes the bike perform like a modern ride. Of course, the 744 cc, 52-horsepower engine certainly helps on that front as well, and today I’m going to dig in and see what sets the Milano apart from its brethren.

Continue reading for my review of the Moto Guzzi V7 III Milano.

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2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone

Eclectic And Essential, Says The Factory

Moto Guzzi’s V7 family expands yet again with the V7 III series that sees the popular “Stone” model carry over from the outgoing V7 II generation. The new Stone carries itself with the same subtle darkness that made its predecessor so popular along with many of the genetic markers normally associated with the Moto Guzzi brand. Foremost among these is the transverse-mount V-twin powerplant that protrudes conspicuously from both sides of the bike, and of course, the 52 ponies that come along with it. The fuel tank strikes a classic shape as well, and the rest of the design falls right into line with plenty of yummy-goodness under the hood in the ABS and traction control features. There’s more to be found, so let’s dig into this little Italian gem with its not-so-polished moniker.

See our review of the Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone.

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2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Carbon Dark

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Carbon Dark

Lustful carbon-fiber parts and red accents

Paying tribute to their past, Moto Guzzi headed to a major revival plan and launched the new range of V9 platform and the third iteration of their most celebrated roadster model, the V7 back in 2017.

The V7 is also the first model created by MG and celebrating the 50th year of the first, the brand launched the V7 III with four editions in 2017: Stone, Special, Racer and a celebratory entrant Anniversario. Expanding this footprint for 2018, MG launched the ‘Rough’, ‘Milano’, ‘Stornello’and finally the ‘Carbon Dark’ edition.

All of the ‘V7s have been prepped up for the consciousness of the new generation of motorcycling. The V7 models will be the same breed of bikes that differ slightly to imprint different characters carrying the same soul, and my favorite of them all is the limited-edition ‘Carbon Dark’, which as the name suggests, gets quite a bit of carbon-fiber on it.

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2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Rough

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Rough

Almost There; Kinda ’Scrambler-Like’

Moto Guzzi expands its V7 III footprint off the black and onto the brown with the new-for-2018 “Rough” variant. As its cleverly-ingenious name implies, this model comes set up to have some definite scramble-tastic tendencies with street-knobbies that perform as well on soft terrain as they do on the pavement. Like the rest of the family, power comes from a 744 cc V-twin that delivers 44 pound-feet of torque for solid holeshots and plenty of hill-conquering grunt. There’s plenty of that characteristic MG style to go around as well, courtesy of the sideways engine mount and fuel tank design. Best of all, the Rough beefs up its entry-level bike claim with ABS and traction control that can be turned off for a raw ride, or enabled for maximum stability. MG snuck some other yummy bits in there, so let’s just go ahead and dig right in.

Continue reading for my review of the Moto Guzzi V7 III Rough.

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2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Carbon Dark

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Carbon Dark

The V7 III Lineup Gets A Black Sheep

Moto Guzzi expands its third-generation V7 family with the new-for-2018 V7 III Carbon Dark. The “Dark” straddles two worlds with design aspects that hail back to the original V7s while touching on the custom culture as well for an interesting blend of the nostalgic and the new. For power, the factory stuck with “the seven-fifty from Mandello” to drive the Dark with 44 pounds of grunt on tap with a traction-control system and ABS brakes to aid the rider in maintaining control, just the kind of stuff you want for an entry-level ride. Manageable power with a solid pedigree and good looks to boot, the V7 III Carbon Dark seems to have a lot to offer for under 10 grand.

Continue reading for my look at the Moto Guzzi V7 III Carbon Dark.

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2017 - 2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Racer

2017 - 2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Racer

A Retro Cafe’ Racer That Hits All The Important Points

Moto Guzzi marks the 50th anniversary of its V7 model family and its racing roots with the race-tastic, limited-run V7 III “Racer.” This third-generation model brings a distinct cafe’ racer vibe to the table along with modern comfort and performance for what the factory hopes is a bike that is “more pleasure to own and ride.” Did they succeed? Well, the jury is still out on that, but the 52-horsepower engine, fully-adjustable rear shocks and pillion pad hidden under the tail fairing certainly bode well for the Racer. ’Guzzi boosted the power this year, and it also updated the visuals and slimmed the bodywork down for more appeal. Traction control provides some contact-patch protection, but that seems to be the fanciest gadget the Racer has to offer. Join me while I dive in to ’Guzzi’s new tribute piece to see what makes it tick.

Continue reading for my review of the Moto Guzzi V7 III Racer.

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Motorcycles that take you to the black&white era.

Motorcycles that take you to the black&white era.

Festooned with modern technology and engine, these bikes bring back time from the ’60s.

Timeless designs that take you back to the pre-’60s era , heightened feeling of riding free-spirited machines and the sense of freedom. This is what a modern day classic motorcycle offers without that knuckle bending fixes and ghastly scenes of oil dripping everywhere.

Drawing inspiration from the brand’s rich heritage, manufacturers are spinning motorcycles that exuberate the classic appeal and character that goes on to showcase their point of arrival into the world of two wheels.

Recalling the past glories, these neo-classic motorcycles have still managed to retain the charm and posterity of minimalistic elegance along with providing modern day mechanicals and the bits. They run on efficient high output engines that are both reliable and powerful and are equipped with state of the art suspension and brake setups that will bring the bike to a halt not far from their point of application unlike the yesteryears.

Today though, we’ll not get talking about power, torque, springs or brakes. Rather, the aura these bikes bring about with their interpretations of what the ’60s were all about and long before that. Their old silhouettes, round headlamps, spokes wheels and all that chrome.

Here are our top five retro picks available on the showroom floors:

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2017 Moto guzzi V7 III

2017 Moto guzzi V7 III

A tribute to 50 years of passion and craftsmanship.

Celebrating 95 years for a company is a big thing, and to have survived against all the odds was a mountainous task for Moto Guzzi. Even after having such a rich racing history of winning almost 3000 races and a couple dozen world championships, the name Moto Guzzi had eerily vanished from the motorcycle scene, until now. The calm before the storm.

Paying tribute to their past, MG headed to a major revival plan and launched the new range of V9 platform that angles towards the cruiser style rather than the V7’s roadster theme. And now, the brand is getting the third iteration of their most celebrated model, the V7 which is also the first model created by MG. Celebrating the 50th year of the first, the brand is launching the V7 III which will have four editions to it: Stone, Special, Racer and a celebratory entrant Anniversario.

Manufacturers and now foraying into the current wave of enthusiasts wanting custom and classic motorbikes. And for Moto Guzzi, it has its own deep roots to draw upon for inspiration from which the ‘V7s have been prepped up for the consciousness of the new generation of motorcycling. The V7 models will be the same breed of bikes that differ slightly to imprint different characters carrying the same soul.

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Piaggio Recall on 2016-2017 Moto Guzzi V7 III and V9 Models

Piaggio Recall on 2016-2017 Moto Guzzi V7 III and V9 Models

Possible Brake Fluid Leak Could Spell Big Trouble

A slew of Moto Guzzi motorcycles are under the gun for a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recall. The front brake hose is routed in a way that allows it to rub against an engine component, possibly creating a loss of containment of the brake fluid. If you can’t get your bike started, that’s a problem. If you’re underway and you can’t stop it, that’s an emergency that no one wants to face. The models involved — some 1,100-plus of them — include the 2016 and 2017 MG V7 III Racer 750, V7 III Stone 750, V7 III Special 750, as well as the V9 Bobber and V9 Roamer.

Continue reading for more on the Piaggio recall.

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2016 Moto Guzzi V7 II

2016 Moto Guzzi V7 II

Back in 1977, Moto Guzzi struck upon a winning formula with the V750 cruiser/tour bike. The original V7 was a hit with riders, and the evolution of that line leads us through the ’08 V7 Classic up to the current V7 II lineup. This lineup includes three sub-models: the 2016 V7 II Stone meant to succeed the V7 Classic, the Special “Scrambler” built to resemble the old-school scramblers from back in the ’70s and the Racer “America” that captures the essence of the cafe’ racer culture from the same era.

Since these markets are once again booming, as if it were their turn again on some great, cosmic wheel of recurring fashions, this line from MG seems to be right on time.

Continue reading for my review of the Moto Guzzi V7 II Stone, V7 II Racer and V7 II Scrambler.

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Moto Guzzi Launches New Mod Kits For V7 II Bike

Moto Guzzi Launches New Mod Kits For V7 II Bike

Moto Guzzi has always had a soft heart for customizers and recently, the Italian automaker enlisted the help of four custom builders to create their own look for the V7 II cafe racer. After months of laborious development, the four kits are now ready to be purchased at any Moto Guzzi dealerships.

The four kits, dubbed Dapper, Legend, Scrambler, and Dark Knight are all the works of some of the best custom bike builders in Italy.

Take the Dark Rider for instance. This custom build was developed by Officine Rossopuro and Filippo Barbacane, well and truly considered as one of the most popular Moto Guzzi custom builders in the world. It’s no surprise that the Italian brand tapped them to create a stealthy and menacing interpretation of the V7 II.

Then there’s Radical Guzzi, who by its sheer name alone, already tells you what kind of brand it specializes in. In this exercise, Radical Guzzi was tasked to create the Dapper kit, which as you can see fits the name it was given. It’s cool, elegant, and suave, all rolled into one, the kind of bike that will undoubtedly be a head-turner everywhere it goes.

Move past these two custom builds and you’ll be introduced to the Legend kit created by Millepercento. While not as flamboyant as the other kits, V7 II Legend embodies all the qualities of a true Moto Guzzi, right down to is retro-inspired color scheme.

Last but certainly not least is the Scrambler courtesy of South Garage. You can’t miss this custom built, too, because it screams all the elements of a tried-and-true Scrambler packaged in a fancy red, white, and black finish.

Each of these custom builds represents a unique identity from the other, embodying the spirit of Moto Guzzi as a custom-friendly brand that knows where its butter lies. Well done to the four builders for their impressive creations and props to Moto Guzzi for giving the platform and the canvas to do it.

Click "continue reading" to read more about Moto Guzzi’s four new customization programs for the M7 II.

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Moto Guzzi V7 Racer Verde Legnano Special Edition

Moto Guzzi V7 Racer Verde Legnano Special Edition

Moto Guzzi is giving North American customers a treat with the announcement of a special edition V7 Racer specifically earmarked for that region.

The cafe racer is a unique take at the 2015 V7 Racer, called the Verde Legnano Special Edition. If you’re wondering what “Verde Legnano” means, that’s the distinctive paint finish Moto Guzzi used on the V7 Racer’s fuel tank. It does add that splashy green finish to break up the monotonous look of the bike.

The other special feature of the V7 Racer Verde Legnano is the red frame that Moto Guzzi added as a hat tip of sorts to the 1971 Telaio Rosso Moto Guzzi V7 Sport.

The motorcycle company is only releasing 50 units of the V7 Racer Verde Legnano so if you’re thinking of scoring one, you better start making plans on how you’re getting one.

Click past the jump to read more about the Moto Guzzi V7 Racer Verde Legnano Special Edition after the jump.

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Moto Guzzi Releases Customizing Kits for the V7 Range

Moto Guzzi Releases Customizing Kits for the V7 Range

Moto Guzzi is jumping aboard the customization bandwagon after announcing the launch of a handful of custom kits for its range of V7 models, specifically the V7 Stone and V7 Special models. The Piaggi-owned motorcycle company hasn’t released the full price list of the custom package, but it did say that it will be offering four kits that allows customers to alter the style of their V7 Stone or V7 Special models.

According to Moto Guzzi, any customer who avails of the available kits can dress up their V7 cafe racers and turn them into either a Scrambler, a matte black Dark Rider, a chrome Dapper, and a Legend kit that includes an olive green or camouflage fairing and tank kit, natural leather tool bags, off-road tires, and a two-in-one high-mounted exhaust.

The only downside to the new custom kits is that Moto Guzzi is only offering the custom kits as an add-on to the actual bikes. So if you’re looking to get the kit options, the first order of business is buying an actual V7 bike, which comes at a price of £6,799 for the V7 Stone and £6,999 for the V7 Special. Once you’ve bought this very important purchase, you can purchase the kit separately, or just score individual parts from the set.

It’s an enticing offer, especially if you’re the type who wants to dress up your Moto Guzzi V7. The mechanics of getting one are admittedly steep, but hey, if you’re going to buy a V7 in the first place, it might not be that bad of an idea to dress it up according to your taste and preference.

Click past the jump to read more about Moto Guzzi’s customization kit for the V7.

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2014 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer

2014 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer

The new Moto Guzi V7 racer continues the success story of the company’s iconic V7 Sport. The new motorcycle offers a perfect merge between the classic and modern design languages and is backed up by a range of contemporary technologies which help it deliver a unique riding experience.

At the heart of the motorcycle lies a modern interpretation of the iconic Moto Guzzi engine introduced by Lino Tonti in the 70s. The modern 744 cc, 90° V-twin, 4-stroke unit generates a maximum power of 37 KW (50HP) at 6,200 rpm and 42.7 Ft Lbs. (58Nm) at 5,000 rpm. All this power is kept under control by a 5 speeds gearbox with cardan final drive.

The engine is housed by a double cradle tubular frame with detachable rear subframe. The frame sits on a front telescopic hydraulic fork with 40 mm stanchions and two fully adjustable shock absorbers.

Hit the jump for more information on the Moto Guzzi V7 Racer.

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2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Special

Moto Guzzi V7 released the complete details on its new 2013 Guzzi V7 Special. The new model was designed to help you ride comfortably on long journeys and is packed with a fresh 750cc, 90° V-twin engine. The 90 V-twin 4-stroke, 744 cc engine develops a maximum output of 37 kW (50HP) at 6,200 rpm and 42.7 ft lbs. / 58Nm of torque at 5,000 rpm.

The new Moto Guzzi V7 Special draws inspiration from the original V7 concept released in the 1970se. Technically, the V7 Special is a touring bike with sophisticated finishings and exclusive technical solutions. Just like its ancestor, it is wrapped in a two-tone color concept and equipped with spoked wheels with aluminum rims.

The motorcycle is equipped with an innovative fuel tank that has a 5.8 gallons capacity which ensures a range of up to 310 miles.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Special.

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2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone

The Moto Guzzi V7 has a long history behind it, as is around since 1967. Thankfully, the bike was constantly upgraded and the contemporary version has all it needs to be considered a modern motorcycle. With a lower seat height, striking colors, and a spirited engine, the 2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone is ready to satisfy your highest standards.

Perhaps it goes without saying that the new model is also pretty easy to customize because is offered with an array of accessories and features including the new 750cc, 90° V-twin engine.

The engine is lightweight and develops a maximum power of 7 kW (50HP) at 6,200 rpm and 42.7 ft lbs./58Nm of torque at 5,000 rpm. While maintaining the classic 90° V configuration, the engine is now comprised of more than 70% new components.

The V7 Stone comes with a two-year manufacturer’s warranty and roadside assistance for one year.

Hit the jump for more information on the Moto Guzzi V7 Stone.

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2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer

2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer

Moto Guzzi upgraded the 2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer which draws inspiration from the café racer motorcycles of the 1950s and 1960s. The new generation is equipped with a more powerful, 750cc, 90-degree V-Twin motor which puts out 50 hp @ 6200 rpm and 58 Nm of torque at 5000 rpm. The engine is combined with a smooth five speed gear box and a new 22 liters fuel tank which ensures a range of up to 310 miles. While maintaining the classic 90° V configuration, the engine is now comprised of more than 70% new components. After the upgrades, the engine provides greater torque and power even at low rpms, and is also more efficient.

Apart from its improved engine, the 2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer has also received a few styling upgrades. The most important modifications are the new chrome fuel tank finished with a studded leather strap, a single-saddle suede seat with an aerodynamic seat cowl and ‘70s-style racer number plates.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2013 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer.

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2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Classic

2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Classic

The Moto Guzzi V7 was always appreciated for its classic design language, the sturdy build quality and the strong performances. The 2012 version of the Moto Guzzi V7 continues to offer all core attributes found on its predecessors, but it receives a fresh design inspired by the famous forerunners, V7 Special and Sport from the seventies.

During its long lifespan the motorcycle’s engine has been updated continuously, sustaining displacements of 350 up to 750 cc, going from carburetor to electronic injection. The 2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Classis is propelled by an air-cooled, fuel-injected 744 cc V-twin which cranks out 48 horsepower at 6,800 RPM and is mated on a five speed gearbox.

The 2012 The Moto Guzzi V7 is available in three versions, two touring models and one sport. All versions are offered with two types of alloy wheels.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2012 Moto Guzzi Classic.

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2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

The new Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic is a testament to what happens when you combine old-school looks with new-school technology. The result is a cafe racer version of the V7 Classic retro roadster that was introduced last year.

In terms of design, the V7 Cafe Classic packs plenty of unique features, including a 31.7" seat height, high pegs, and café-style bars that make for a comfortable ride courtesy of the bullet seat. Speaking of comfort, riding the Cafe Classic won’t give you the speed thrills you’re looking for, but what it does give you is a comfortable and classy ride on a bike that exudes retro awesomeness. Even the contrasted instrumentation and the elegant, aero-inspired filler cap exudes that old-school look that has become en vogue these days.

Speaking of the engine, the V7 Cafe Classic isn’t the most powerful bike on the market, but it does have a powertrain that’s more than capable of holding its own. The bike is powered by Guzzi’s small block 750 Nevada V-twin powertrain in an old school twin shock chassis. This engine comes equipped with twin shocks, spoke wheels, and period Veglia-esque clocks, all of which add to the Classic’s vintage virtue. While the blacked-out frame, fenders, drivetrain, fork lowers, and a fast idle lever show more modern style, the combination of styling and performance makes for a bike that’s perfect for a ride out in town.

Find out more about the Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic after the jump.

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2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer

2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Racer

What makes the Moto Guzzi V7 Racer such a desirable bike? Lots of reasons, if you know what you’re looking for.

Built in 2008, the V7 Racer comes with a design inspired by its predecessors - the V7 Special and Sport from the seventies - but combined with the technology of a modern Moto Guzzi. The result is a bike that’s well worth owning.

One of the first things you’ll notice about the V7 Racer is the red frame that was inspired by the legendary first 150 examples of the V7 Sport with CrMo frames. The bike also has an ultra sporty single-seater saddle - with a two-seater saddle and pillion footpegs available as optional accessories - that has been upholstered in suede. The seat leads into an aerodynamic tail fairing that also incorporates lateral race number panels in true Seventies style.

In terms of power, the Guzzi V7 Racer doesn’t hold back, thanks to an updated 745cc V-twin engine with more than 70% of its internal components being all-new, and twin intake manifolds and throttle bodies being replaced with a single Y manifold and single 38mm Magneti Marelli throttle body. All these components help the bike not only improve its fuel economy, but also reduce CO2 emissions.
The updated engine of the V7 also gets a redesigned fuel tank with the tank now lighter than the earlier unit and made of metal instead of polyethylene. All told, the bike can hit 51 horsepower and 58 Nm of torque, enough numbers to make it a worthwhile cafe racer.

Find out more about the Moto Guzzi V7 Racer after the jump

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2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Racer

2012 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Racer

Italian style and superb craftsmanship in a motorcycle created for collectors in search of vintage appeal.

Moto Guzzi V7 Racer paying tribute to the remarkable achievement of the V7 Sport model, with the legendary icon Mandello del Lario.

When I find pictures of new Moto Guzzi V7 Racer is planned to be launched in 2012, how much I wanted to ride this bike.

It is undeniable that the Moto Guzzi has worked in more than three decades now, and now is the time regenerates the original products specifically in the form of new V7 Racer. There is a characteristic of the marque’s passion and high-level skills in it. Produced in an edition number, the new V7 Racer has signaled a balanced mix between the classic style of the brand Moto Guzzi with the expertise and the latest technology in every aspect of this amazing motorcycle.

Designed as a limited edition production bike, the latest V7 Racer is decorated with a beautiful paint scheme and a dazzling mechanical engineering with a view in honor of the drivers who take part in earlier times.

With café style, the V7 Racer is stimulated by adrenaline fuels can be ridden between the cafes and challenging street circuit. So no doubt often be a champion of cafe racer motorcycle on the first era.

Technically, the V7 Racer is equipped with a 744 cc engine capacity and then on the transmission side is 5-gear gearbox. Meanwhile the fuel system been used is the Weber Marelli electronic fuel injection with a compression ratio of 9.6:1. Maximum power that can be generated by this V7 Racer is 48 horsepower at 6.800 rpm.

Tires used by the V7 Racer is Pirelli Sport Demon with details the front is a 100/90- 18 56H TL and the rear is a 130/80 -17 TL 65H. Braking system is no less sophisticated by using Brembo, where the front brakes are 320 mm floating stainless steel disc, caliper with opposed pistons 4 differently sized, and the rear brakes are 260 mm stainless steel disc.

The price for the newest Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Racer in around $6,500 and we already can bring back the Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Racer home as one of our greatest ride or just for collection purpose.

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eBay find of the day: Moto Guzzi V7 Sport by Combined Design

eBay find of the day: Moto Guzzi V7 Sport by Combined Design

We just came across this on eBay and started digging more into it only to find that we’re dealing with a 1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport completely restored by Combined Design. The rare piece of engineering is now called Cherry O due to the Candy Apple Red paintjob, but apart from that it’s as close to the original thing as you get. The bid starts at $5,988.88 so, with some luck, you’re in for a bargain.

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2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Clubman Racer

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Clubman Racer

Moto Guzzi’s V7 family now has a new member, which is willing to teach motorcyclists a thing or two about the ways they can enjoy riding the world’s greatest machine with wheels as long as they open their eyes and prick up their ears. Unveiled last week in Milan, the 2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Clubman Racer is reminiscent of 1970s Italian café racers. Then, as now, these were machines that handled beautifully and stopped fast, managing to compete with Japanese bikes with seriously more horsepower available at the rear wheel.

With a 744cc V-twin developing only 48.8 hp and 58.2 Nm, but featuring a beautifully crafted frame, upgraded suspension and brakes, the 2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Clubman Racer remains faithful to the original recipe and addresses to nostalgics of the period. Also featuring wrapped headers and upswept Arrow exhuasts, polished aluminum tank, rearsets and clip-ons as well as Pirelli Demon Sport tires, I guess you can look at it as to a V7 Classic with a soft spot for races. Hit the jump to read the press release.

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2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

The biggest news about the 2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic is that it comes stateside to try and show American riders how 48bhp and 54lb/ft produced by a 744cc, air-cooled V-twin engine can prove terribly enjoyable when the riding position and handling are just right. And if we take in consideration the clip-ons, upswept exhaust pipes, a bullet seat, revised suspension geometry and 40mm Marzocchi forks, which distinguish the Cafe Classic from the regular V7 model, the chances for that to happen are very real. Expect Moto Guzzi to price this at around $9,000. We’ve attached the press information after the break.

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Video: Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

Video: Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic

Moto Guzzi has just presented their official promotional video of the new V7 Café Classic launched by the Italian maker at the end of 2008 at the EICMA Saloon in Milan.

The bike in the video is actually a special edition of the V7 Classic and which stands out thanks to the café-racer seat, rubber gas tank pads as well as due to the two-tone color scheme.

If you’ve been searching for the closest thing sounding like symphony on two wheels, this Moto Guzzi might be it.

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Motorcycle video of the day: Moto Guzzi V7 Classic

Motorcycle video of the day: Moto Guzzi V7 Classic

Here’s the commercial video for the 2008 Moto Guzzi V7 Classic, the revival of Giulio Cesare Carcano’s ’67 Moto Guzzi V7.

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2008 Moto Guzzi V7 Classic

2008 Moto Guzzi V7 Classic

Introduction
A tribute to a legend
In 1967, the motorcycle market reeled in shock at the appearance of the first Italian maxi motorcycle: Created by the legendary Giulio Cesare Carcano, the Moto Guzzi V7 marked the debut of the transverse V90 twin-cylinder 703 cc engine that set a record at that time. The V7 was enthusiastically acclaimed by the press and public. This success helped the worldwide promotion of Moto Guzzi’s image as manufacturers of an exclusive, elegant, comfortable and (...)

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