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Helmet Recalls

Helmet Recalls

Torc T-55.2 Recall; Strategic Sports buying back 828 Zox Nano Helmets

Most recalls deal with problems that could cause an accident, but in this case, the unsafe condition can arise during and after the wreck. H&H Sports Protection filed with the NHTSA over a defect with some of its Torc T-55 V2 low-profile half helmets. It looks like these buckets, in sizes from XS all the way up through XXL, can fail if impacted during a wreck, and could potentially fail to remain on the head as well. Needless to say, this defeats the purpose of wearing the darned thing in the first place. We also have a recall on 828 Zox Nano helmets. If you own one of the affected buckets, Strategic Sports is offering to buy it back at purchase price.

Continue reading for more information on the recalls.

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Marc Marquez Announces Finalists For Catalonian GP Helmet Contest

Marc Marquez Announces Finalists For Catalonian GP Helmet Contest

Defending MotoGP champion Marc Marquez is a man of the people, that much everybody can agree to. The two-time champion proved as much when he hosted a competition in March 2015, asking independent designers to come up with the best
design for the helmet he’d be wearing at the Catalunya GP on June 14, 2015.

Turns out, his invitation was overwhelmingly received as over 500 entries were submitted. To his credit, Marquez didn’t let anybody decide which designs made it to the final stage of the competition. He did that by himself, browsing through all the designs multiple times until he was able to narrow it down to 22. From 500 to 22 for a guy who’s smack in the middle of an intense MotoGP season. That’s commitment right there, ladies and gentlemen.

Since the Catalunya GP is a month away from today, we expect Marquez to make a decision on who the winner is going to be soon. So if any of you guys found your name on the list at the tail-end of the video, we want to congratulate you for making it this far.

Here’s to hoping that your design gets chosen! I can’t imagine how cool it would feel to tell your family and friends that the design on the helmet Marquez will wear in the race was of your own making.

Good luck, finalists!

Continue reading to read more about Marc Marquez’s Catalunya GP helmet contest.

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Shoei Jointly Developing Photochromic Face Shield On Helmets

Shoei Jointly Developing Photochromic Face Shield On Helmets

Motorcycle helmet manufacturer Shoei has always been at the forefront of helmet technology, having established a well-earned reputation as one of the industry’s finest in this particular field. That said, the company has embarked on yet another ambitious project with Transitions Optical Inc.

The result of this collaboration is the Transitions CWR-1 photochromic face shield, an adaptive face shield that pretty much changes its appearance depending on the lighting conditions. Basically, it can adjust its tint from clear to very dark automatically without the rider doing it himself. It’s a pretty nifty feature to have on a helmet because it lets riders concentrate on the road without worrying about stripping off dirty face shields.

According to Shoei, the revolutionary face field acts in such a way that when they’re exposed to UV light, trillions of photochromic molecules in the shield begin to change their structures, causing the shields to turn dark. But it doesn’t stay dark too long because the same molecules constantly re-calibrates so that the optimal amount of light reaches the rider’s eyes at any point in the day. Equally important is Shoei’s claim that the CWR-1 photochromic face shield can block UVA and UVB radiation.

The only downside to the technology is that it’s only available on Shoei’s RF-1200 full-face helmet. Here’s the good news, though. If the technology proves to be popular among riders, then we might see it in Shoei’s other helmets. The helmet does come with a cost, albeit at a pretty reasonable price of $169.99.

Click "continue reading" to read more about Shoie’s new photochromic face shield technology.

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AGV Showcases GT-Veloce Helmet

AGV Showcases GT-Veloce Helmet

Helmet manufacturer AGV is primarily known for producing track-focused helmets like the Corsa and the Pista GP. Well, now it looks like the company’s preparing to translate that technology into the world of street helmets with the new GT-Veloce, a top-end street helmet that features a lot of the characteristics found on its race helmet brethren.

The GT-Veloce’s race-bred roots is clearly identified in the construction of the helmet, especially when it comes to its lightweight, safety, aerodynamics, and ventilation characteristics.

To understand the uniqueness of the GT-Veloce, you have to understand the full workings of how the helmet was created. To give it the level of shine it deserves, AGV developed the helmet using its trademark Extreme Standards, a methodical and complicated process that makes use of a number of systems and development measures, including Finite Element Analysis, Computational Fluid Dynamics and wind-tunnel testing.

The shell of the helmet is also as state-of-the-art as it can be; it’s made from a number of lightweight materials, including carbon fiber, aramid, and composite fiber. These three materials not only contribute in producing a lightweight shell, but they’re also strong and sturdy enough to accomplish its primary purpose of protecting the rider’s head.

That said, the GT-Veloce doesn’t feature the rear spoiler that’s normally found in the Corsa and Pista GP. AGV decided to eliminate that altogether in order to give the helmet a more rounded profile that’s far more appropriate for street riders, especially for those who ride cruisers.

Available in sizes ranging from XS to XXL, AGV’s GT-Veloce helmet retails for just $559.95.

Click "continue reading" to read more about the AGV GT-Veloce helmet.

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Video: The Nand Logic Helmet Is A Computer On Your Head

Video: The Nand Logic Helmet Is A Computer On Your Head

Smart helmets are becoming more and more prevalent these days, thanks in large part to the rapid speed by which technology advances. I’ve written about a couple of them in the past few months and now, I’m back at it again with another helmet that promises an array of features unique to its own.

The helmet is called the Nand Logic and like I said, it’s littered with a generous amount of gizmos and gadgetry that will capture the attention of a lot of motorcycle riders. First of all, the Nand Logic has LED modules. Lots of it, in fact. These modules are used for a variety of purposes, including as turn signals, brake lights, and even dual headlights just in case a rider needs better visibility at night.

That’s not all. The Nand Logic also has two cameras, one pointing to the front and one at the rear. An accompanying SD card can store photos and HD videos captured by these two cameras an be played as picture-in-picture or as a dual stream.

It also has SoC capability, giving the helmet object recognition capabilities and analyze video stream in real time. The recognition feature is particularly important because the system is able to detect any imminent signs of danger and sends out an audio alarm to the mini speakers found inside the helmet. Adding to its computer-like capabilities is a blind spot warning that functions the same way as the object recognition feature.

If you think that’s the extent of features found on the Nand Logic, you’d be wrong. Yep. There’s more.

Click past the jump to read more about the Nand Logic helmet.

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Video: Introducing Shark's Skwal LED-Integrated Helmet

Video: Introducing Shark’s Skwal LED-Integrated Helmet

Unless you’re involved in auto racing, car drivers don’t necessarily need to wear helmets. But motorcycle riders are a different story, largely because they’re more exposed to the elements compared to drivers. That’s why it’s important for helmet manufacturers to continue breaking the mold and develop new technologies to push helmet safety to a new level.

Fortunately, we have helmet specialist Shark to do the job for us. The French company has just unveiled its latest pride and joy called SKWAL, or as it likes to call it, the world’s first production helmet with integrated LED lights. The SKWAL helmets was actually introduced at the 2014 Motorcycle Live Show, but now it appears that the helmet is now being sold publicly at various stores, including Amazon.

As far as the helmet itself is concerned, Shark developed the SKWAL helmet by incorporating four LED modules, two of which can be found at the back of head with the other two located in the forehead and the chin of the helmet. These LED modules do as they’re described; they light up at night, presumably by way of a manual switch, to create a clear and distinctive illumination that car drivers and other motorcycle riders can easily notice.

The technology itself is unlikely to eliminate road accidents, but it should at least curb the numbers a little bit. In the ever evolving struggle for automotive safety, a helmet like the Shark Skwal could end up playing a big role in cutting the number of accidents down, even for just a little bit.

If you’re interested in buying one, you can check out Shark’s dealership network in the US on the company’s own website.

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Valentino Rossi's "Ugly Christmas Sweater" Helmet is...Ugly

Valentino Rossi’s "Ugly Christmas Sweater" Helmet is...Ugly

Valentino Rossi is a man of many skills. He can ride bikes. He can race cars. Heck, he might be even good at math for all I know. But what he isn’t good at is picking the designs on his helmet. Now I know that it’s tradition for Dr. Rossi to introduce a new winter test helmet design, but the latest one he just introduced brings ugly to a whole new level.

You know how a lot of people have taken to holding “Ugly Christmas Sweater” parties during the holidays? Well, Rossi’s helmet is probably reserved for such an occasion and not on MotoGP winter testing ahead of the new season.

First of all, the volt color finish looks ostentatious. But that doesn’t even begin to describe the sheer inanity of the holidays-inspired design. There are small christmas trees, snowflakes, and reindeer silhouettes, among other things. In other words, things you normally don’t put in a MotoGP helmet.

Then again, if there’s one man who can get away with something like this, it’s Rossi. After all, he is the most decorated motorcycle racer of all time, having won nine MotoGP titles and eyeing his 10th title this coming season. If this were another racer, he probably wouldn’t be able to live down all the jokes and cat-calls made about his seemingly distorted fashion choice. But this is Rossi we’re talking about. He can wear a Dora the Explorer-themed helmet and nobody would call him out on it.

Ok, not nobody because I certainly would’ve. Hopefully, Rossi opts to use this “Ugly Christmas Sweater” exclusively during testing sessions ahead of the upcoming MotoGP season.

Click past the jump to read more about Valentino Rossi’s "Ugly Christmas Sweater" helmet after the jump.

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Bell Adds New Helmet, New Dates to Custom-Fit Helmet Program

Bell Adds New Helmet, New Dates to Custom-Fit Helmet Program

There’s no shortage of interesting news coming out of Bell these days. Anytime there’s something relevant about helmets making the news, somehow it seems like Bell finds a way to be involved in it.

Recently, the renowned helmet manufacturer’s high-tech Custom-Fit program has added new dates and motorcycle shows where riders can work on getting their helmets personalized. Even better news: Bell’s now offering a new helmet model to complement the Star Carbon full-face helmet, which was initially the only helmet model that can be personalized. Now, the company has also added the Moto-9 helmet, a light carbon premium helmet designed specifically for off-roading purposes.

Somewhere, I can already here motocross riders cheering with excitement.

The inclusion of the Moto-9 helmet is part of Bell’s bigger plan to put riders at the forefront of helmet customization. There’s no better way to do that than letting riders do it themselves, albeit with a little professional guidance, of course.

Bell’s Custom-Fit program is interesting in a lot of ways. For one, it allows riders to have their heads laser-scanned in order to obtain an accurate shape of the head that will later serve as a baseline in the development of the helmet’s EPS inner shell. With this method, riders won’t have to worry about finding a helmet that fits their head; these helmets already do that for them. That’s comfort you can’t buy.

The development of the EPS inner shell is important in ensuring the safety of the rider. It’a capability in absorbing shock energy brought about by traumatic collisions ensures that only a small amount of energy finds its way into the skull. That could be the difference between a rider who survives a potentially life-threatening crash from someone who doesn’t.

There are so many things about Bell’s Custom-Fit program that riders should really pay careful attention to. Be sure to check out the company’s schedule because you never know, program might be headed to a city near you.

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Video: Front Wheelie Stunt Goes Horribly Wrong, Ends Up Causing Traffic

Video: Front Wheelie Stunt Goes Horribly Wrong, Ends Up Causing Traffic

Here’s a tip if you’re going to do some kind of silly bike stunt on a busy road. Make sure that a) you have a helmet on, and b) you’re not disturbing the traffic that will most likely build up if you somehow make a mess out of your stunt.

The dude in this video forgot to do both things, which is why he gets the ignominious honor of being called out for his foibles. The stunts themselves were pretty neat so I’m going to give him some props too. But he gets little to no love from me for risking life and limb without any safety equipment on. In fact, those sunglasses of his is probably the closest thing to a safety equipment he has on.

Things start off fine as the rider mixes in some stunts while riding his motorcycle. Then he decides to do a front wheelie. Whether it was putting on too much brakes or it was just a case of forcing too much momentum on the front wheels, the bottom line is the dude ends up falling on his bike, unable to pick up his bike by himself. Not only did that cause the cars behind him to lurch to a stop, but his buddies capturing the scene promptly leaves him behind to fend for himself against a mass of frustrated commuters.

Well done, fine sir. Maybe next time you do your stunts in less populated streets?

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Video: 6D Helmets Celebrates Customer Appreciation With Ride Day

Video: 6D Helmets Celebrates Customer Appreciation With Ride Day

Helmets are the most important safety equipment for anybody who decides to ride a motorcycle. These things are even more important if you’re competing in a bike race. That’s a big reason why a company like 6D Helmets exists. Recently, the helmet manufacturer hosted a ride day at the Perris Raceway in Perris, California to showcase its new line of headgear for casual and professional riders alike.

The event was more than just a publicity stunt, although a big part of it can be described as such. The bigger purpose behind the whole spectacle was to give back to the riders that use 6D Helmets. From young tykes to adult riders, and even some motocross athletes were on hand to lend their support for the brand. That last group even includes the likes of Eli Tomac from Geico Honda, Kevin Aiello from Factory KHS Bicycles, and Nick Burson and Jeremy Purvines from Purvines Racing.

Not surprisingly, 6D Helmets founder and CEO Bob Weber was also in attendance. He couldn’t have been happier to see a lot its sponsored athletes, as well as old and new customers, attend the event and be part of the festivities.

In just two short years, 6D Helmets has grown in prominence in the motocross scene and judging by the turnout of its recent ride day, there are a lot of reasons to be optimistic about 6D Helmets’ future moving forward.

Onward to progress, so they say.

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Shoei Introduces X2 Hornet Helmet

Shoei Introduces X2 Hornet Helmet

Japanese helmet manufacturer Shoei has been around for a long time. That kind of tenure in these business has allowed the company to see the evolution of helmets and how technology has played a starring role in the business.

Shoei has also been at the forefront of helmet development and recently, the company unveiled its latest pride and joy, the all-new Hornet X2, the successor to the popular Hornet dual-sport helmet that the company first introduced in 2008.

The Hornet X2 takes a lot of the elements from the original Hornet and gives them a steady dose of upgrades, beginning with the architecture of the visor. The helmet’s construction is made up of a Multi-Ply Matrix AIM+ outer shell that’s made up of no less than 6 layers, ensuring its durability even when subjected to substandard riding conditions. Take a closer look at that part of the helmet and you’ll notice that there are new vents that been added in to help reduce lift and drag whenever a rider is blasting his bike at high speeds on the highway. Don’t worry about the nuisance of having your head being forcibly tilted backwards by the rushing air. These vents now prevent that from happening.

The new helmet also incorporates an exclusive Shoei-developed CN-2 face shield. According to Shoie, the face shield features a 3D injection mold piece that allegedly blocks 99 percent of the sun’s UV rays. I’m not quite sure how to corroborate that, but at least Shoie is proud of its claim and won’t hesitate to promote it any chance it gets.

The face shield isn’t the only unique feature of the Hornet X2. If you’re worried about fog forming on your visor, the Hornet X2 actually has a Pinlock EVO fog-resistant lens that prevents that from happening. If, say, you’re in the business of enjoying your off-road sojourns, the Hornet X2 can also accommodate riding goggles.

Moving inside, the Hornet X2 was given a Max-Dry Interior System II liner, a 3D-shaped, removable, washable and resizable liner with an Emergency Quick Release System. The helmet also comes in various sizes ranging from XS to XXL to go with a five-year guarantee for anybody who might consider shelling out $595 for the chance of opening one. Add some sprinkling of graphic details on the helmet and that cost could go up as high as $716.

Click past the jump to read more about the Shoie Hornet X2 helmet.

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AGV Releases Valentino Rossi's Pink Floyd-Inspired Helmet in Limited Numbers

AGV Releases Valentino Rossi’s Pink Floyd-Inspired Helmet in Limited Numbers

AGV, a company that specializes in customized motorcycle helmets, has released a limited edition helmet that just may be one for the books. The helmet in question is actually similar to the one MotoGP superstar Valentino Rossi wore during the Misano round of the 2013 MotoGP season. If your memories need a little shot to remember the design of the helmet, Rossi wore a Pink Floyd-inspired masterpiece in honor of his departed buddy, Marco Simoncelli.

The details in the headgear include styling cues taken from the British band’s Wish You Were Here album. Of particular interest to any Pink Floyd fan are the pair of robotic hands that join together with a background featuring the four natural elements of the world. At the back of the limited edition helmet is a photo that anybody who bought the aforementioned album will be a familiar with: two men shaking hands in the middle of a street with one of them apparently on fire.

Other pertinent details of the Corsa “Wish” helmet touches on Rossi’s other sponsors, including the unmistakable Monster Energy “M claw” logo that can be prominently see on the chin guard of the helmet.

The Corsa “Wish” helmet, which is made in Italy, will be sold in limited quantities with each piece selling for $999. Christmas may be over, but if you have some spare funds to tap into, you could use it to buy a really slick limited edition helmet with ties to Vale himself and one of the UK’s most iconic bands, Pink Floyd.

Click past the jump to read more about AGV’s Valentino Rossi Corsa limited edition helmet.

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Shark Evoline Series 3 Helmet

Shark Evoline Series 3 Helmet

About a decade ago, modular helmets came on the scene. They offered the benefits of making it easier for those who wear eyeglasses to put the helmet on, and to raise the front part of the helmet to get a little air at stop lights or gas stops and talk to your riding buddies.

The drawback was that the helmets were not designed to be ridden with the chinbar up. They rested on top of the helmet, and created so much aerodynamic drag that it would try to yank the helmet off your head at speeds above 25 miles per hour.

Then in 2009 Shark Helmets came out with a game changing helmet - the Evoline. When I say “game changing”, think about the first laptop computer, or the first tablet device, iPod, iPhone, or even the first package of sliced bread. The Evoline was the first modular helmet – and still the only one I’ve ever seen – that is designed to swing the chinbar assembly all the way back to rest behind the back of the helmet. That puts it out of the wind blast so the helmet is aerodynamic enough to ride at speed in total comfort. And the rider can still lower the face shield and the tinted “jet fighter” sun shade independently.

Hit the jump for the rest of the story.

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Reevu designed the first motorcycle helmet with a heads-up display

Reevu designed the first motorcycle helmet with a heads-up display

When it comes to motorcycle helmets, Reevu is one of the most innovative manufacturers. The company is known for its famous, high tech helmets with built-in rear viewers and now has an even bigger surprise for us.

Its new product is a modern helmet with an integrated head-up display that looks like a piece of gear borrowed from a sci-fi movie.

The digital display is integrated into the top of the visor and keeps you posted on vital stats such as engine RPMs, speed, sat-nav directions or sector split times and lap times.

Unfortunately the company didn’t’ reveal too many information about its futuristic helmet, but it seems to be using a technology called the “multiple reflective optical system” that won’t disturb the rider’s eyes in any way.

The solution found by Reevu is welcomed, as one of the most common causes of accidents is that the riders didn’t look where they were going. That lapse of attention created by the moment when one wants to check his speed or tachometer could transform into a disaster.

Hit the jump for the official press release

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Bell Helmets revealed the new Rogue helmet

Bell Helmets revealed the new Rogue helmet

The guys from Bell Helmets have finally revealed their new Rogue helmet aimed at the cruiser riders. Like any standard helmet the new Rogue was built to guard against the elements. However, what makes it so special is the fact that it has the looks of a half helmet with the comfort of a 3/4. Technically it is a half helmet paired with an adjustable and removable muzzle.

Due to its unique design, the helmet is definitely not for everyone, but we’ll have to admit that it looks quite cool. The new Rogue is made of a lightweight composite shell with an “ultra-comfortable interior”, magnetic locks and integrated speaker pockets.

The new Bell Rogue is priced at $ 249.95, is available in 3 shell sizes and comes with a five year warranty. The available colors include Gunny, Black, Army Green and Matte Black.

Hit the jump for more photos of the new Bell Rogue.

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Video: British Superstock 600 crash shows us the true value of helmets

Video: British Superstock 600 crash shows us the true value of helmets

Anybody that has ever questioned the importance of racing helmets should take a step back and watch this video.

The scene is the British Superstock 600, where riders Josh Wainwright and Johnny Bradshaw were involved in a ridiculous crash that could’ve been far worse than the injuries they sustained - if it weren’t for their helmets.

In the 11th lap of the race, Wainwright lost control of his bike and as he stumbled into the track, Bradshaw’s bike literally clips him on the head, forcing the former to catapult out of his ride and into the track.

Read that again: Bradshaw’s bike literally clips him on the head.

If it weren’t for the helmet Wainwright was wearing, Bradshaw’s bike would have done far worse when it clipped him on his head. We all know where this story would then go.

Miraculously for the two riders, both of them escaped the harrowing accident with nothing more than a cracked rib and a broken collarbone for Wainwright and some minor injuries for Bradshaw.

If you’ve ever ridden a bike, or anything that involves needing one, heed caution and just put those helmets on. You never know when it’s going to save your life.

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