• Deus Ex Machina Brings Back The Tenere To the Yamaha T7

  • Take one Yamaha T7 Tenere And go back in time with Deus Ex Machina
  • Function follows form It's still impressive off-road
  • Bodywork moulds 3D printed Can be replicated if demand is there
  • Shown at Wheels and Waves Jean-Claude Moussé put it through its paces
  • The Yamaha T7 How it looked before Deus got their hands on it
  • SC Projects Exhaust Full titanium system
  • Full of retro chic

Turning Modern Into Retro

LISTEN 03:14

The Yamaha T7 Tenere was a new direction in adventure bikes when it was launched. Missing the extreme size and weight of other large adventure bikes, it was also refreshingly simple. Not the obvious basis for a customisation project, Deus of Australia obviously thought otherwise and came up with this brilliant homage to Paris-Dakar racers of the late 1970s/early 1980s.

Deus Works Its Magic on the Yamaha T7

Deus Ex Machina Brings Back The Tenere To the Yamaha T7
- image 1006038
Take one Yamaha T7 Tenere
And go back in time with Deus Ex Machina

It might have taken Yamaha a couple of years to launch the much-anticipated T7 Ténéré but, when it arrived, some people looked at it and wondered how it was ever going to compete with the current crop of massive and massively technologically complicated adventure bikes. Here was a bike fitted with the parallel twin engine out of the MT-07 and with a distinct lack of electronic trickery, not to mention being positively featherweight compared to its rivals.

Deus Ex Machina Brings Back The Tenere To the Yamaha T7
- image 1006032
Function follows form
It’s still impressive off-road

The thing is, it was never meant to compete with rivals from KTM or BMW. It was designed to be as agile and competent as a 450cc Enduro bike, just with more all-round ability. It was as if Yamaha was turning back the clock.

Deus Ex Machina Brings Back The Tenere To the Yamaha T7
- image 1006036

Normally, Adventure or Enduro bikes don’t appear on the radar of customisers, but Deus of Australia took one look at the T7 and another look at the XSR900 road bike, with its retro styling and wondered if the two could be married successfully.

Deus Ex Machina Brings Back The Tenere To the Yamaha T7
- image 1006033
Bodywork moulds 3D printed
Can be replicated if demand is there

The answer, as these photos show, was a resounding yes. Deus has turned the T7 into an enduro bike that wouldn’t look out of place in a 1970s version of the International Six Days Trial or an early 1980s Paris-Dakar.

Deus Ex Machina Brings Back The Tenere To the Yamaha T7
- image 1006039
Shown at Wheels and Waves
Jean-Claude Moussé put it through its paces

The majority of the transformation is courtesy of the bodywork. Deus removed all the stock plastics and replaced then with a whole new body kit, with help from Camal Studio. 3D printed parts were first made, from which castings were made which act as moulds to form fibreglass body parts. This means that, should the demand be there, Deus can replicate the parts for any T7 owner wanting to do the same two his or her bike.

Deus Ex Machina Brings Back The Tenere To the Yamaha T7
- image 1006035
The Yamaha T7
How it looked before Deus got their hands on it

The most striking feature is the large fuel tank, so reminiscent of past Yamaha rally raid bikes. This fits over the standard fuel cell and is fixed using the original mounting points so no further fabrication is needed.

The seat/tail unit is one piece and similarly boxy and again reminds us of the Ténéré XT660, which did battle at the Paris-Dakar. Finishing it all off are the traditional Yamaha yellow/black colour scheme with the broken black stripe seen on so many Yamahas over the years. The front is distinguished by a totally retro square light and small fly-screen.

Deus Ex Machina Brings Back The Tenere To the Yamaha T7
- image 1006040
SC Projects Exhaust
Full titanium system

Suspension has been re-worked, with 30mm taller Andreani forks and Öhlins single shock at the back. The exhaust is by SC Project and is a full titanium system.

It might not possess any more ability through the cosmetic changes than a standard T7, but it sure looks a whole lot better.

Harry Fisher
Harry Fisher
Motorcycling Contributor
Born and raised in England, he has lived in South Africa with his family since 2002. Harry has owned examples of Triumph, Norton, BSA, MV Agusta, Honda, BMW, Ducati, Harley Davidson, Kawasaki and Moto Morini motorcycles. He regrets selling all of them.  Read full bio
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