Automotive technology is moving at such a brisk pace that new vehicular features are popping out everywhere. Jaguar Land Rover knows this, which is why it’s determined to join the party rather than get left out in the cold. The British company is pioneering a new technology that will extend to the world of motorcycle safety.

The technology is called the Bike Sense system and as the name implies, it’s designed specifically to let car drivers know when a motorcycle is approaching so that the driver can take all the necessary safety measures to ensure that he doesn’t hit the approaching cyclist and his bike. It’s a pretty unique system that actually uses a plethora of warning details, specifically through colors, sounds, and touch inside the car.

How does the system work exactly? Well, the first level of warning involves sensors on the car that immediately detects an approaching vehicle and determines if its a bicycle or a motorcycle. Instead of using standard warning tools, Bike Sense will use lights and sounds that the driver will instinctively associate with the potential danger. Once a bike is detected, the car’s audio system will immediately make a the sound of a bicycle through the speaker nearest to the bike, alerting the driver the direction where the cyclist is coming form.

As the bike comes nearer to the car, the driver’s seat will extend to ‘tap’ the driver on the left or right shoulder with the whole point of alerting the driver to look over his shoulder to identify the motorcycle. If that’s not enough, a matrix of LED lights integrated into the dashboard, window sills, and windscreen pillars will glow amber and then red as the bike approaches. A specific surface inside the cabin will light up to show where the direction the bike is taking. The whole idea behind this is to create a visual highlight using colors associated with danger to allow the driver to know where that danger is coming from.

The system also works whenever a driver’s line of sight is impeded, thanks to sensors that will detect a cyclist crossing the road through a similar directional light and sound method. Should the driver ignore all these warnings, the Bike Sense system will vibrate or stiffen up the accelerator as a last resort to get the driver’s attention. In the event a driver or a passenger is opening a door without knowing that a bike is fast approaching, the door handles will light up, vibrate and buzz.

The technology is pretty incredible and could go a long way to prevent future accidents involving cars and bikes. But Jaguar Land Rover is the first to admit that the technology is still two years away from production. That said, let’s all hope that it comes to fruition sooner than later, which would allow JLC to integrate them into its new lineup of vehicles.

Click past the jump to read more about Jaguar Land Rover’s Bike Sense technology.

Why it matters

I’ve always championed automotive safety as one of the most important aspects of the industry. The Bike Sense system is important because it not only allows cars and its drivers to be alert about the presence of bikes in their vicinity, but it also gives careful importance on the bike and the rider, too.

I’ve personally seen accidents involving cars and their drivers who don’t see an approaching motorcyclist. Far too often, these sorts of accidents result in injuries on the cyclist because he’s in a far more vulnerable position than a car driver.

Hopefully, this new technology can be developed to the point that a lot of cars, not just JLC models, have this as a safety feature. If this is the kind of system it takes to ensure the safety of cyclists on the road, then you can be sure that I’m all for it.

Jaguar Land Rover said that it’s going to take two years before the technology is up and running. Let’s just hope that the British company can make enough strides to see the tech through. Far more than looking and sounding cool, the Bike Sense system looks to have a real place in this world for the safety and well-being of cyclists.

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