• Why Has There Never Been a Bike on the Moon?

  • Hookie Tardigrade Lunar motorcycle concept collaboration between Russian designer and German moto builder
  • There's never Been a Lunar Motorcycle NASA never gone down the two-wheeled route, maybe sensibly
  • Electric Top speed of 9mph and a 70 mile range would permit a lot of exploration
  • Electronic Steering
  • Airless Wheels Not only super lightweight carbon construction but no problem with punctures
  • Aluminium Space Frame Light and easy to assemble, all-in weight of the bike is 134kg
  • Donor Bike The Cake Osa was the basis for the build

There are good reasons but it hasn’t stopped this company coming up with one

NASA has sent men to the moon and provided them with a lunar car to drive around in but never a bike, which would be lighter and smaller but there are problems. It hasn’t stopped one company coming up with a concept, however.

Lunar Motorcycle Concept from Hookie Co.

Why Has There Never Been a Bike on the Moon?
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Hookie Tardigrade
Lunar motorcycle concept collaboration between Russian designer and German moto builder

There are pretty good reasons why a motorcycle-type vehicle would be unsuitable on the moon: lack of stability and the increased possibility of an accident, stranding the astronaut far away from base are the obvious ones. Lack of carrying ability is another.

Why Has There Never Been a Bike on the Moon?
- image 1024786
There’s never Been a Lunar Motorcycle
NASA never gone down the two-wheeled route, maybe sensibly

So, while NASA has never developed a lunar motorcycle, that hasn’t stopped Russian designer Andrew Fabishevskiy from coming up with a concept, turned into reality by Nico von Hookie of Hookie Co. in Germany.

Why Has There Never Been a Bike on the Moon?
- image 1024787
Electric
Top speed of 9mph and a 70 mile range would permit a lot of exploration

Called the Hookie Tardigrade, it’s destination is a more earth-bound destination, the Petersen Museum in Los Angeles and the ADV:Overland exhibition.

Why Has There Never Been a Bike on the Moon?
- image 1024788
Electronic Steering

Using a Cake Osa as a basis, the frame is an aluminium space-frame (pun intended!) and it runs on airless carbon wheels. Weighing 134kg - much of that weight is the battery and electric motor - it has a top speed of 9mph and a range of 70 miles. Steering is electronic and it has been designed for ease of assembly.

Why Has There Never Been a Bike on the Moon?
- image 1024789
Airless Wheels
Not only super lightweight carbon construction but no problem with punctures

While it will never see service in its intended environment, it’s a fascinating design study that might influence designers of earth-bound motorcycles in the future.

Why Has There Never Been a Bike on the Moon?
- image 1024792
Aluminium Space Frame
Light and easy to assemble, all-in weight of the bike is 134kg

If you want to see the lunar bike, it will be on display at the ADV: Overland exhibition at the Petersen Museum from mid-October 2021.

Harry Fisher
Harry Fisher
Motorcycling Contributor
Born and raised in England, he has lived in South Africa with his family since 2002. Harry has owned examples of Triumph, Norton, BSA, MV Agusta, Honda, BMW, Ducati, Harley Davidson, Kawasaki and Moto Morini motorcycles. He regrets selling all of them.  Read full bio
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ADV: Overland Exhibition at the Petersen Museum Exhibition

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