An heir to the RSV4 dynasty, it’s the epitome of a thrill machine

Aprilia rolls into the new decade with its racebike-inspired Tuono V4 1100 RR. The factory drew on its own not-inconsiderable WSBK experience to turn out this track-capable ride, and the targeted demographic would be those riders who actually aspire to hit a closed-circuit or road course. A 175-horsepower V4 plant delivers the goods with a full array of revamped, race-centric, ride-quality electronics and corner-sensing technology to complete the package. Essentially, what we have here is a liter-sized superbike with some of the bodywork stripped down to produce a very capable naked streetfighter.

  • 2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
  • Year:
    2020
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    V4
  • Displacement:
    1077 cc
  • Top Speed:
    155 mph (Est.)
  • Price:
    15499
  • Price:

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR Design

  • Full color 4.3-inch TFT display
  • Street-legal equipment
  • Blackout treatment
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878398
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878392
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878390

The Tuono V4 1100 RR may be set up to actually race, but it’s also bred for the streets, so it comes with all the expected street-legal equipment. A trio of headlights split the night with cowl-mount, standoff-style turn signals to finish the forward lighting, and I’m sure the latter is easily removed ahead of race days.

Up top, a smoked, bubble-shaped flyscreen punches a minimal hole in the wind so I doubt you can tuck in tightly enough to fully fit in the pocket. Look just beneath the outboard headlights and you’ll notice some slots molded into the front fairing; these are intake ports that take advantage of the pressurized air at the nose of the machine for a low-budget boost to the volumetric efficiency. That’s the good news, the bad news is that you have to get up to around 100 mph before this feature generates any appreciable boost to the performance, so it’s going to be next to useless on public roads aside from the bragging rights that come with the standard equipment package.

Minimal cheek fairings form the upper half of the sportbike scoop, but falls short of even covering the sides of the radiator to start out the naked look abruptly after the almost superbike-like visage it leads off with. The frame and engine is largely exposed, and there’s just enough blackout treatment here and there to suggest a home/garage-modified machine.

Low-rise bars pull you forward over the 4.8-gallon fuel tank to encourage an aggressive riding posture, but still have just enough pullback to give your wrists and shoulders a break through a more-upright riding position. A full-color, thin-film transistor display bundles all of the instrumentation into one location and acts as the rider interface for the higher electronic features, plus it will network with your smartphone and respond to voice commands through the Aprilia optional MIA accessory.

Out back, an adjustable plateholder, taglight, and blinkers all come integrated, no doubt to make it easier to strip all of the above ahead of race days. Up under the tip of the tail, the taillight takes care of business from its permanent position up out of harm’s way. If you like to share the fun with a friend, the sculpted p-pad and fold-up footpegs will help keep that brave soul aboard.

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR Chassis

  • Electronically-controlled steering damper
  • Multimap cornering ABS
  • Decidedly agile
  • RSV4-derived handling and stability
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878402
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878393
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878388

Aluminum is the material of choice for the perimeter frame on the Tuono V4 1100 RR with dual beams as the main structure, cast and pressed members for reinforcement and rigidity, and the engine is used as a stressed member to finish off the skeleton. Aprilia again draws from its WSBK experience for the steering damper, stems, and anchors for the Tuono V4 1100 RR. Öhlins provides the electronically-controlled steering damper for automatic kickback protection, while Sachs makes the 43 mm usd front forks and piggyback monoshock.

A 27-degree rake angle and 3.92-inch trail put the RR at the decidedly agile end of the spectrum. The suspension comes with the full trinity of adjustments so you can dial both ends in, manually, ’til you get just what you want as far as ride and feel is concerned. Cast-aluminum rims contribute to a low unsprung weight and come in the standard 17-inch diameter with a Z-rated 120/70 up front opposite a 190/55 to round out the rolling chassis.

The brakes are substantial, and like the suspension, taken straight off the new RSV4.

Dual 330 mm discs and four-piston, radial-mount, Brembo Monobloc front calipers do the bulk of the work – around 70-percent – while a 220 mm disc and twin-pot anchor keep the rear end behind you, ya know, where it belongs. Anti-lock comes stock, and its none other than Bosch’s 9.1 MP cornering ABS feature that boasts three separate modes for variable amounts of slide and rear wheel-liftup mitigation, plus it can be turned off entirely for raw brake action.

Frame: Aluminum dual beam chassis with pressed and cast sheet elements. Smart EC 2.0 electronically managed Öhlins steering damper
Front suspension/ Wheel travel: Sachs upside-down “one by one” fork, Ø 43 mm stanchions. Forged aluminum radial caliper mounting bracket. Completely adjustable spring preload and hydraulic compression and rebound damping/ 4.6 in (117 mm)
Rear suspension/ Wheel travel: Double braced aluminum swingarm; mixed low thickness and sheet casting technology. Sachs monoshock absorber with piggy-back, fully adjustable in: spring preload, hydraulic compression and rebound damping. APS progressive linkages/ 5.1 inches (130 mm)
Headstock angle: 27°
Trail: 3.9 inches (99.7 mm)
Brakes, Front: Dual 330 mm floating stainless steel disc with lightweight stainless steel rotor with 6 pins. Brembo M50 monobloc radial calipers with 4 Ø30mm opposing pistons. Sintered pads. Radial pump and metal braided brake lines.
Brakes, Rear: 220 mm disc; Brembo floating caliper with two 32-mm Ø isolated pistons. Sintered pads. Master cylinder with built in reservoir and metal braided hose. Bosch 9.1 MP ABS with cornering function, adjustable on 3 maps, featuring RLM strategy and can be disengaged.
Wheels: Cast aluminum wheels with 3 split spoke design.
Wheel, Front: 3.5”x17”
Wheel, Rear: 6.00”x17”
Tires: Radial tubeless.
Tire, Front: 120/70 ZR 17
Tire, Rear: 190/55 ZR 17

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR Drivetrain

  • 1,077 cc V-4 engine
  • 175 Horsepower @ 11,000 rpm
  • 89 pound-feet @ 9,000 rpm
  • Three engine maps, all delivering full power
  • New exhaust system
  • ’Aprilia Performance Ride Control’ suite
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878396
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878391
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878387
Aprilia powers the Tuono V4 1100 RR with a 65-degree four-cylinder Vee, hence the ingeniously clever name, and the result is devastating.

At 11,000 rpm, the liquid-cooled mill grinds out a whopping 175 horsepower with 89 pound-feet of torque that maxes out at 9 grand. That’s a lot of power to deal with, but the factory gives you the tools you need to keep it rubber-side down.

It starts with a ride-by-wire control that communicates with a new Electronic Control Unit as the primary command feature under a trio of power-delivery curves, and the RR bundles a slew of race-centric electronics under the Aprilia Performance Ride Control umbrella. Lean-sensitive traction/wheelie control joins the ABS for added stability; there’s a Launch Control that helps you nail your holeshots and a Quick Shift feature that’ll send you both up and down the range without ever touching the clutch. The Aprilia Pit Limiter lets you set your pit-lane speed if you actually ride the thing in some sort of sanctioned event to finish out the fandanglery.

A six-speed, cassette-style transmission crunches the ratios, and in between the gearbox and the lump, a slipper-type clutch does its thing to deliver light clutch pulls and drag-torque protection. As for the engine itself, it relies on a quartet of 48 mm Weber-Marelli throttle bodies for induction control with a Magneti Marelli digital ECS and coil-over plug wires to manage the ignition. It’s seriously oversquare with an 81 mm bore and short, 52.3 mm stroke for a total displacement of 1,077 cc. The overall drive ratio makes for a 155 mph top speed.

Engine: Aprilia longitudinal 65° V-4 cylinder, 4-stroke, liquid cooling system, double overhead camshafts (DOHC), four valves per cylinder
Bore x Stroke: 81 mm x 52.3 mm
Displacement: 1,077 cc
Maximum power at crankshaft: 175 hp (129 kW) @ 11,000 rpm
Maximum torque at crankshaft: 89 lb-ft (121 Nm) @ 9,000 rpm
Fuel system: Airbox with front dynamic air intakes. 4 Weber-Marelli 48-mm throttle bodies with 4 injectors and latest generation Ride-by-Wire engine management that the rider can select on the fly: T (Track), S (Sport), R (Race)
Ignition: Magneti Marelli digital electronic ignition system integrated in engine control system, with one spark plug per cylinder and “stick-coil”-type coils
Starter: Electric
Exhaust: 4 into 2 into 1 layout, two oxygen sensors, lateral single silencer with ECU-controlled bypass valve and integrated trivalent catalytic converter (Euro 4).
Alternator: Flywheel mounted 450 W alternator with rare earth magnets
Lubrication: Wet sump lubrication system with oil radiator and two oil pumps (lubrication and cooling)
Transmission: 6-speed cassette type gearbox
Gear Ratios: 1st: 39/15 (2.600), 2nd: 33/16 (2.063), 3rd: 34/20 (1.700), 4th: 32/22 (1.455), 5th: 34/26 (1.308), 6th: 33/27 (1.222), Gear lever with Aprilia Quick Shift electronic system (AQS)
Clutch: Multiplate wet clutch with slipper system
Primary drive: Straight cut gears and integrated flexible coupling, drive ratio: 73/44 (1,659)
Secondary drive: Chain: Drive ratio: 42/15 (2.8)

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR Pricing

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878397
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878389
2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878399

The 2020 Tuono V4 1100 RR rolls in a choice of two paint packages; the gray-over-black Grigio Magny-Cours and the red-over-black Rosso Sachenring. Price is the same no matter which color you pick at $15,499.

Traction management: APRC System (Aprilia Performance Ride Control), which includes Traction Control (ATC), Wheelie Control (AWC), Launch Control (ALC), cruise control (ACC) and speed limiter (APL), all of which can be configured and deactivated independently
Colors: Grigio Magny-Cours, Rosso Sachsenring
Price: $15,499

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR Competitors

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
- image 878394
2020 Ducati Streetfighter V4 / V4 S
- image 871019

Aprilia is a tough act to follow, it’s true, but I think I found a match for it and I didn’t even have to leave Europe’s boot to find it, the Ducati Streetfighter V4 S.

Ducati Streetfighter V4 S

2020 Ducati Streetfighter V4 / V4 S
- image 870998
Ducati's new Streetfighter line is the same sort of bike as the Tuono V4 1100 RR in that it packs true track capabilities into a package that allows it to blend right in with the naked streetfighter genre.

As for bodywork, it’s a trade off since the Ducati carries much less up in front of the forks but connects the dots in the engine cowling for a complete sport scoop, pretty much the opposite of the Aprilia’s layout.

The rest is pretty similar across the board since the Streetfighter quickly opens up to expose elements of both frame and engine with the same concession to passenger comfort/safety out back so you can take a friend or easily strike the fold-up footpegs to strip down to your race weight.

The Streetfighter relies on a stressed engine to complete the frame, perhaps a good deal more than the Tuono as the steering head is supported entirely by the engine. Öhlins wins again with its components holding up both bikes, and arguably the Duc got the better end of the deal as it rocks the Smart 2.0 automatic mode that delivers event-based performance. Duc milks a staggering 208 horsepower and 90.4 pound-feet of torque against the Aprilia’s 175/89 for a significant advantage on paper. The Streetfighter is set up with all the same electronics except it trades the pit-limiter for a Slide Control feature.

At the end of the day, it comes down to a power advantage in favor of the Ducati, but that comes with a significant price offset at $23,995 against the reasonably-priced $15,499 sticker on the Aprilia.

Read our full review of the Ducati Streetfighter V4 / V4 S.

He Said

“The scary thing about this ride, is its accessibility. It brings a lot of power to the table, and at that price point, there is no sticker shock to act as a firewall. Just remember kids; just because you can afford it, doesn’t necessarily follow that you must buy it. This is a machine for advanced riders, to be sure.”

She Said

My wife and fellow motorcycle writer, Allyn Hinton, says, “Something notable that I don’t see many people talking about is the ride modes all deliver full power, unlike many other bikes that reduce power for a ’Rain’ mode, Aprilia gives you three modes in which the difference is the amount of engine braking. I guess the folks at Aprilia figure you can handle the rain yourself if you have a bike like this, and an awesome beast it is, too, with so much of it derived from, or taken straight from, the RSV4. On an aside note, a point that might matter to some folks is replacing the exhaust, even if you put on the approved Akrapovic slip-on, voids your warranty.”

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR Specifications

Engine & Drivetrain:
Engine: Aprilia longitudinal 65° V-4 cylinder, 4-stroke, liquid cooling system, double overhead camshafts (DOHC), four valves per cylinder
Bore x Stroke: 81 mm x 52.3 mm
Displacement: 1,077 cc
Maximum power at crankshaft: 175 hp (129 kW) @ 11,000 rpm
Maximum torque at crankshaft: 89 lb-ft (121 Nm) @ 9,000 rpm
Fuel system: Airbox with front dynamic air intakes. 4 Weber-Marelli 48-mm throttle bodies with 4 injectors and latest generation Ride-by-Wire engine management that the rider can select on the fly: T (Track), S (Sport), R (Race)
Ignition: Magneti Marelli digital electronic ignition system integrated in engine control system, with one spark plug per cylinder and “stick-coil”-type coils
Starter: Electric
Exhaust: 4 into 2 into 1 layout, two oxygen sensors, lateral single silencer with ECU-controlled bypass valve and integrated trivalent catalytic converter (Euro 4).
Alternator: Flywheel mounted 450 W alternator with rare earth magnets
Lubrication: Wet sump lubrication system with oil radiator and two oil pumps (lubrication and cooling)
Transmission: 6-speed cassette type gearbox
Gear Ratios: 1st: 39/15 (2.600), 2nd: 33/16 (2.063), 3rd: 34/20 (1.700), 4th: 32/22 (1.455), 5th: 34/26 (1.308), 6th: 33/27 (1.222), Gear lever with Aprilia Quick Shift electronic system (AQS)
Clutch: Multiplate wet clutch with slipper system
Primary drive: Straight cut gears and integrated flexible coupling, drive ratio: 73/44 (1,659)
Secondary drive: Chain: Drive ratio: 42/15 (2.8)
Chassis:
Frame: Aluminum dual beam chassis with pressed and cast sheet elements. Smart EC 2.0 electronically managed Öhlins steering damper
Front suspension/ Wheel travel: Sachs upside-down “one by one” fork, Ø 43 mm stanchions. Forged aluminum radial caliper mounting bracket. Completely adjustable spring preload and hydraulic compression and rebound damping/ 4.6 in (117 mm)
Rear suspension/ Wheel travel: Double braced aluminum swingarm; mixed low thickness and sheet casting technology. Sachs monoshock absorber with piggy-back, fully adjustable in: spring preload, hydraulic compression and rebound damping. APS progressive linkages/ 5.1 inches (130 mm)
Headstock angle: 27°
Trail: 3.9 inches (99.7 mm)
Brakes, Front: Dual 330 mm floating stainless steel disc with lightweight stainless steel rotor with 6 pins. Brembo M50 monobloc radial calipers with 4 Ø30mm opposing pistons. Sintered pads. Radial pump and metal braided brake lines.
Brakes, Rear: 220 mm disc; Brembo floating caliper with two 32-mm Ø isolated pistons. Sintered pads. Master cylinder with built in reservoir and metal braided hose. Bosch 9.1 MP ABS with cornering function, adjustable on 3 maps, featuring RLM strategy and can be disengaged.
Wheels: Cast aluminum wheels with 3 split spoke design.
Wheel, Front: 3.5”x17”
Wheel, Rear: 6.00”x17”
Tires: Radial tubeless.
Tire, Front: 120/70 ZR 17
Tire, Rear: 190/55 ZR 17
Dimensions & Capacities:
Wheelbase: 57.1 inches (1,450 mm)
Length: 81.5 inches (2,070 mm)
Width: 31.9 inches (810 mm)
Saddle height: 32.5 inches (825 mm)
Dry weight: 407.8 lbs (185 kg)
Curb weight*: 460.8 lbs (209 kg) (*with a full tank)
Fuel economy: 30.5 mpg (7.71 l/100 km)
Fuel tank capacity: 4.9 gals including 1-gal reserve (18.5 liters including 4-liter reserve)
Top Speed: 155 mph (est)
Details:
Traction management: APRC System (Aprilia Performance Ride Control), which includes Traction Control (ATC), Wheelie Control (AWC), Launch Control (ALC), cruise control (ACC) and speed limiter (APL), all of which can be configured and deactivated independently
Colors: Grigio Magny-Cours, Rosso Sachsenring
Price: $15,499

Further Reading

Aprilia

ALLYN IMAGES: DO NOT DELETE
- image 804382

Read more Aprilia news.

TJ Hinton
T.J got an early start from his father and other family members who owned and rode motorcycles, and by helping with various mechanical repairs throughout childhood. That planted a seed that grew into a well-rounded appreciation of all things mechanical, and eventually, into a formal education of same. Though primarily a Harley rider, he has an appreciation for all sorts of bikes and doesn't discriminate against any particular brand or region of origin. He currently holds an Associate's degree in applied mechanical science from his time at the M.M.I.  Read More
About the author

All images featured on this website are copyrighted to their respective rightful owners. No infringement is intended. Image Source: aprilia.com, ducati.com

Press release

Related Articles

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 Factory

2019 Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory

What do you think?
Show Comments
Motorcycle Finder: