Maybe a Flat Tracker, Maybe A Scrambler? Not Really Either

Ducati’s popular Scrambler line saw its footprint expand significantly with the addition of a handful of new models that includes the flat track-tastic Full Throttle. There’s no denying that scrambler-style bikes are enjoying an uptick right along with flat track-style racing, so it makes perfect sense for Duc to bring these two worlds together in a bid to grab its slice of the market pie. Model-specific details are the garnish on the main dish that is the base Scrambler, and of course, the 75-horsepower, Desmodromic L-twin powerplant takes care of business for the “FT,” same as it does for the rest of the line. LED, USB and ABS tech factors into the fandanglery to make this a thoroughly modern ride, so without further ado, let’s dig in and see how Duc sets this ride apart from its brethren.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle.

  • 2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
  • Year:
    2017- 2018
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    L-Twin
  • Displacement:
    803 cc
  • Price:
    10695
  • Price:

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle Design

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
- image 781159
Rather than being a slave to history, the new Scramblers pay a passing tribute while forging a path all their own.

The factory calls it “post-heritage,” and it’s easy to see why. Sure, it sorta-kinda looks like a historical scrambler in that it’s a standard streetbike similar to the basis of the originals, but rather than being a slave to history, the new Scramblers pay a passing tribute while forging a path all their own. One such link is found right up front at the front fender that is chopped down far beyond the normal limits of functionality, and one can argue that it also ties into the flat-track design as well though actual race bikes typically run without any fender whatsoever.

Inverted front forks impart an impression of great strength with splash guards to protect the swept area of the inner fork tube, thus prolonging the life of the seal. A round headlight can makes another classic connection, but only in outward appearances; the can contains super bright LED emitters that provide high-beam, low-beam and DRL functions with standoff LED turn signals to finish off the forward lighting. A single round instrument housing contains a digital display that covers all the bases to include speedo, tach, three odometers, a gas light (not to be confused with a gaslight) and a host of idiot lights for everything else.

Pullback bars give the rider the necessary leverage to keep the front end under control, even if you’re brave enough to take the corners sideways. That rules me out, I can assure you. The bars push the rider into a more upright position than you would get from its café racer sibling, but not as upright as the more relaxed classics in the lineup for a compromise that leaves room for the extreme body contortions needed to properly pull off the above maneuver (reference the note about courage.)

A narrow waist accommodates the rider’s legs with deep cutaways at the front of the seat ahead of a shallow scoop that segregates it from the pillion pad. J.C. handles ride tucked away inconspicuously along each side of the p-pad where they serve the usual dual purpose as a grab rail for the passenger and an anchor point for a bungee net/backseat storage. At the tip of the tail, the LED taillight rides tucked out of harm’s way with turn-signal whiskers as the only clutter at the terminus of the subframe thanks to the one-sided hugger that eliminates the rear fender and relocates the tag down to where it will do the least amount of visual damage. Upswept pipes give it a final sporty kick that really helps to sell the whole flat-track package.

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle Chassis

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
- image 781150
Chassis geometry makes the FT eager in the corners, but it also keeps the parking lot behavior reasonable as well.

Tubular steel is the material of choice for the Trellis frame that serves as a structural web and adds aesthetic value as well, ’cause who doesn’t like a nice Trellis cage? Yeah, the engine replaces much of the frame as a stressed unit, and while that certainly saves some weight, it just doesn’t look quite as cool as the full monty.

Cast-alloy, 10-spoke rims round out the rolling chassis with a Pirelli MT 60 RS 110/80-18 up front opposite a 180/55-17 out back. The tread pattern reflects the dual-surface-purpose of the bike, and it should provide balanced performance with a bias toward the blacktop. Kayaba provides the suspension with a 41 mm usd fork up front and monoshock out back. Vanilla is the flavor of the day up front, but the rear shock adds an adjustable rebound damper to the spring preload feature for a little lagniappe.

The steering head holds the forks at a 24-degree angle with 4.4 inches of trail and a 35-degree lock-to-lock range over a 56.9-inch wheelbase. Not only does this make the FT eager in the corners, it also keeps the parking lot behavior reasonable as well. Is it enough for the extreme steering angles associated with flat-track racing? You’re welcome to test that for yourself, dear reader, and get back to me.

Brembo supplies the anchors with a four-pot, M4.32B monobloc caliper and large, 330 mm disc to slow the front wheel. Out back, a single-piston caliper bites a 245 mm disc with a Bosch 9.1 MP anti-lock system as a safety net to prevent loss of traction due to overenthusiastic braking.

Frame: Tubular steel Trellis frame
Rake: 24°
Trail: 112 mm (4.4 in.)
Front suspension: Upside down Kayaba 41 mm fork
Rear suspension: Kayaba rear shock, pre-load and rebound adjustable. Aluminum double-sided swingarm
Front brake: 330 mm disc, radial 4-piston caliper with ABS as standard equipment
Rear brake: 245 mm disc, 1-piston floating caliper with ABS as standard equipment
Front wheel/ Travel: 10-spoke in light alloy, 3.00" x 18"/ 150 mm (5.9 in.)
Rear wheel/ Travel: 10-spoke in light alloy, 5.50" x 17"/ 150 mm (5.9 in.)
Front tire: Pirelli MT 60 RS 110/80 R18
Rear tire: Pirelli MT 60 RS 180/55 R17

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle Drivetrain

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
- image 781148
It's the same engine as the Monster and Hypermotard, but with a milder cam for a friendlier and linear power curve.

Ducati’s 803 cc, L-twin Desmodue engine provides the power with a total of 75 horsepower at 8,250 rpm backed up by 50.2 pound-feet that develops fully at the 5,750 rpm mark. Some of the innards — the crankshaft and the pistons to be precise — come from Ducati’s race-tastic Monster and Hypermotard 796 engine, but the factory opted for a milder cam for a friendlier and linear power curve. That’s particularly good news for the entry-level crowd since it gives the FT rather noob-friendly delivery that is unlikely to take an inexperienced rider by surprise.

The cam operates the twin valve heads using Ducati’s famous Desmodromic system that replaces the traditional spring-return setup with a push-open/pull-closed system. To help meet Euro 4 emissions standards, the factory limits the valve overlap — that period of rotation where both the intake and exhaust valves are open and exhaust-gas scavenging is occurring — to a mere 11 degrees to prevent excessive free hydrocarbons from finding their way into the exhaust stream with a catalytic converter downstream to burn off anything that manages to make it past the exhaust valves.

A 50 mm throttle body manages the induction without the complication of traction control or any other such fandanglery, but the rear contact patch gets some more love in the form of a slipper clutch that inhibits the effects of backtorque on the system during aggressive downshifts. It couples engine power to the six-speed transmission and chain final drive.

Engine: L-Twin, Desmodromic distribution, 2 valves per cylinder, air cooled
Displacement: 803 cc
Bore x stroke: 88 x 66 mm
Compression ratio: 11:1
Power: 54 kW (73 hp) @ 8,250 rpm
Torque: 67 Nm (49 lb-ft) @ 5,750 rpm
Fuel injection: Electronic fuel injection, 50 mm throttle body
Exhaust: Exhaust system with single stainless steel muffler, aluminum silencer covers, catalytic converter and 2 lambda probes
Gearbox: 6 speed
Clutch: APTC wet multiplate with mechanical control

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle Price

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
- image 781158
Priced above entry-level, the Full Throttle will hit the wallet for almost $11k.

The Full Throttle comes in Shining Black with a distinctive yellow-and-black checkerboard pattern on both tank and front fender for $10,695 MSRP with a 24-month, unlimited-mileage warranty.

Standard Equipment: Steel tank with interchangeable aluminum side panels, headlight with glass lens, LED light-guide and interchangeable aluminum cover, LED rear light with diffusion-light, LCD instruments with interchangeable aluminum cover, machine-finished aluminum belt covers, under-seat storage compartment with USB socket
Full Throttle Equipment: Termignoni slip-on silencer, low aluminum handlebars, flat-track inspired seat, sport tail piece with dedicate turn indicator support, sports style front mudguard, black fuel tank side covers, dedicated logo
Warranty: 24 months unlimited mileage
Color: Shining Black
Price: $10,695

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle Competitors

2017 - 2018 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 767093
2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
- image 781152
Power delivery is a trade off that leaves the Triumph a bit short, but the RbW feature and switchable traction control make up for a handful of ponies every time.

Adventure bikes are a dime-a-dozen nowadays, but scramblers are more like their homebuilt grandparents, and truly capable dual-surface machines are somewhat rare in spite of the heritage associated with the genre. Triumph’s Street Scrambler is one such ride. The “SS” carries itself with the dignity and the classic standard build one expects of the marque. Sure you could call it stodgy and mired in the past, but I quite like the look, myself.

Cut-down fenders and generous blackout treatment makes the custom connection for the SS with the traditional tank shape that comes complete with knee pads. A shotgun exhaust gives it a classic-sport panache that completes the ensemble and the wire wheels just put it over the top. I know I’m showing my age, and I know that the FT is intended to grab a younger buyer, but the Triumph triumphs in the aesthetics department.

Trumpet stumbles in the stems with straight-up vanilla front and rear, and the brakes are somewhat less-noble as well even though the SS does at least come with ABS protection to match the FT. Power delivery is a trade off that leaves the Brit with the short end of the stick with 55 horsepower and 59 pounds o’ grunt against 75/50, but the RbW feature and switchable traction control make up for a handful of ponies every time.

Duc gets a minor victory at the checkout — very minor. The Triumph Street Scrambler starts out at $10,800 in Jet Black but goes on up to $11,300 for the Korosi Red/Frozen Silver two-tone finish. Sure, it ain’t much, but it may make a difference to someone on a budget.

He Said

“I don’t know y’all; it looks like someone took the lid off the flat-tracker jar and just waved it over the Full Throttle. It looks cool, to be sure, but it doesn’t really strike me as anything approaching a proper flat-track bike, and would probably lose badly to the Triumph Street Scrambler in a real race. That said, most folks will never even set foot on a flat track, myself included, so it doesn’t really matter how capable it is, now does it?”

She Said

My wife and fellow motorcycle writer, Allyn Hinton, says, “This is really a city bike, and I’m not sure how scrambler-esque it is beyond country roads. As a commuter, it’s quite nice as long as you don’t have too far to go and that ride to work doesn’t take you more than a couple of exits up the interstate. The seat is not very comfortable for anything but short hops and the pillion is pretty much nonexistent. Even though it has the hint of a dual seat, I consider this a solo seat in practical use. It gives the impression of a flat tracker without actually being a flat tracker and it has the hint of a scrambler without actually being a scrambler. As an urban commuter, though, it is quite nice.”

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle Specifications

Engine & Drivetrain:
Engine: L-Twin, Desmodromic distribution, 2 valves per cylinder, air cooled
Displacement: 803 cc
Bore x stroke: 88 x 66 mm
Compression ratio: 11:1
Power: 54 kW (73 hp) @ 8,250 rpm
Torque: 67 Nm (49 lb-ft) @ 5,750 rpm
Fuel injection: Electronic fuel injection, 50 mm throttle body
Exhaust: Exhaust system with single stainless steel muffler, aluminum silencer covers, catalytic converter and 2 lambda probes
Gearbox: 6 speed
Ratio: 1=32/13 2=30/18 3=28/21 4=26/23 5=22/22 6=24/26
Primary drive: Straight cut gears; Ratio 1.85:1
Final drive: Chain; Front sprocket 15; Rear sprocket 46
Clutch: APTC wet multiplate with mechanical control
Chassis:
Frame: Tubular steel Trellis frame
Rake: 24°
Trail: 112 mm (4.4 in.)
Front suspension: Upside down Kayaba 41 mm fork
Rear suspension: Kayaba rear shock, pre-load and rebound adjustable. Aluminum double-sided swingarm
Front brake: 330 mm disc, radial 4-piston caliper with ABS as standard equipment
Rear brake: 245 mm disc, 1-piston floating caliper with ABS as standard equipment
Front wheel/ Travel: 10-spoke in light alloy, 3.00" x 18"/ 150 mm (5.9 in.)
Rear wheel/ Travel: 10-spoke in light alloy, 5.50" x 17"/ 150 mm (5.9 in.)
Front tire: Pirelli MT 60 RS 110/80 R18
Rear tire: Pirelli MT 60 RS 180/55 R17
Dimensions & Capacities:
Wheelbase: 1,445 mm (56.9 in.)
Total steering lock: 35°
Fuel tank capacity: 13.5 L - (3.57 US gallons)
Dry weight: 170 kg (375 lb)
Wet weight: 186 kg (410 lb)
Seat height: 790 mm (31.1 in.)
Max height: 1,150 mm (45.3 in.) / brake reservoir
Max width: 845 mm (33.3 in.) / mirrors
Max length: 2,100 – 2,165 mm (82.7 - 85.2 in.)
Number of seats: Dual seat
Emissions and Consumption CO2: 5,0 l/100 km - 117 g/km
Details:
Standard Equipment: Steel tank with interchangeable aluminum side panels, headlight with glass lens, LED light-guide and interchangeable aluminum cover, LED rear light with diffusion-light, LCD instruments with interchangeable aluminum cover, machine-finished aluminum belt covers, under-seat storage compartment with USB socket
Full Throttle Equipment: Termignoni slip-on silencer, low aluminum handlebars, flat-track inspired seat, sport tail piece with dedicate turn indicator support, sports style front mudguard, black fuel tank side covers, dedicated logo
Warranty: 24 months unlimited mileage
Color: Shining Black
Price: $10,695

References

Triumph Street Scrambler

2017 - 2018 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 773799

See our review of the Triumph Street Scrambler

<h4 Ducati Monster 797

2017 - 2018 Ducati Monster 797 / 797 Plus
- image 731767

See our review of the Ducati Monster 797.

<Ducati Hypermotard 939

2016 - 2018 Ducati Hypermotard 939
- image 729908

See our review of the Ducati Hypermotard 939.

All images featured on this website are copyrighted to their respective rightful owners. No infringement is intended. Image Source: triumphmotorcycles.com, ducati.com

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