Let Me Be Clear: This Is Not A Poser Machine

Ducati expands its Panigale lineup and replaces its “1299” with a new model that’s meant to take over as the new apex-predator – the Panigale V4 – and the new Panigale V4 S Corse builds on that platform with a race-worthy package. Not only does it closely resemble the MotoGP version with much the same look and equipment, it doubles down with the factory race team’s unmistakable colors in its unique livery. Lest there be any confusion on this point, let me be clear; this is not a wannabe/poser machine. It doesn’t waste any weight on the road-legal gear that’s rather superfluous on a racebike, and it’s intended for the closed-circuit and proper road-courses only. However, no expense was spared in the ride-control electronics department, and the robust suite makes this a veritable marvel on two wheels.

  • 2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
  • Year:
    2019
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    V4
  • Displacement:
    1103 cc
  • Top Speed:
    190 mph (Est.)
  • Price:
    29995
  • Price:

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse Design

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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The Panigale family has long been full-on superbikes, and the V4 S “Corse” is no exception.

The Panigale family has long been full-on superbikes, and the V4 S “Corse” is no exception with windtunnel-tested body panels and fairings that are meant to maximize penetration and minimize drag along its length. A blunt nose fairing houses a pair of recessed headlights complete with DRLs, but the standoff mirrors and turn signals on the street-legal V4s were some of the first bits to hit the cutting room floor.

Ram-air ports at the inboard edge of the light recesses feed pressurized air to the intake tract. The volumetric efficiency curve is fairly flat below 100 mph, but once you get there you will enjoy an effect not unlike that of a turbocharger, just a little weaker.

On top, a clear bubble-screen punches a hole in the wind to form the rider’s pocket, but only for those who tuck in all the way. Clip-on bars and a fuel tank that slopes downward at the front helps toward that end by giving you plenty of room to lean forward.

The 4.23-gallon fuel tank bears the typical upper shoulders and knee pockets that narrow the trailing end where it meets the waist to enable the side-to-side body English for you fiery-eyed knee draggers out there. An upswept subframe lofts the tail with a deep swale for the saddle that pulls you down into the bike to aid with the man-to-machine integration.

The rear end is enclosed by a tail fairing, and it looks like there’s a pillion pad hidden beneath, though I can’t imagine why; I certainly wouldn’t want to be on the back of such a machine. A pair of thin LED lights take care of all the rearward lighting in style while keeping weight and bulk to a minimum. The Ducati Red paint is broken up by blue, white and silver graphics to make that crucial connection to the official race bike.

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse Chassis

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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The suspension at both ends is fully adjustable and comes stock with the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 automatic suspension control that dynamically tunes itself based on conditions.

Ducati takes the stressed-engine design to the Nth degree with an aluminum-alloy front frame that bolts directly to the engine and doesn’t directly touch the rear of the frame that mounts the swingarm pivot. The steering head establishes a rake angle of 24.5 degrees with four inches of trail to establish some agile geometry. In back, another chunk of framing bolts up to the integral transmission case to mount the rear suspension and the single-side aluminum swingarm. Not only does this framing method keep weight down, but it also delivers a rigidity you just don’t get from a “proper” frame.

Öhlins provides all of the suspension components with a set of inverted, 43 mm, NIX30 forks up front and a TTX36 monoshock in back, plus a steering damper on the front frame that absorbs kickback and contributes to stability. The suspension at both ends is fully adjustable and comes stock with the Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 automatic suspension control that dynamically tunes itself based on conditions.

Forged-aluminum Marchesini rims round out the rolling chassis with a light, triple-spoke design. Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP hoops make the connection to the pavement with a 120/70-17 up front opposite an extra wide, 200/60-17, and the rubber comes with a ZR rating that’ll tolerate top speeds and hard cornering.

Dual, 330 mm discs and four-piston, Brembo Stylema M4.30 calipers haul down the front wheel with a 245 mm disc and twin-piston caliper out back. The monobloc construction provides a stable anchor for the pads with no flex or give in the system. A corner-sensitive Bosch ABS EVO feature measures the inertial forces working on the chassis and calculates the available traction so it can modulate the level of intervention so as to not break the rear wheel loose.

Frame: Aluminum alloy "Front Frame"
Front suspension: Öhlins NIX30 43 mm fully adjustable fork with TiN treatment. Electronic compression and rebound damping adjustment with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 event-based mode
Rear Suspension: Fully adjustable Öhlins TTX36 unit. Electronic compression and rebound damping adjustment with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 event-based mode. Aluminum single-sided swingarm
Rake: 24.5°
Front wheel trail: 4 in (100 mm)
Wheel travel (front/rear): 4.7 in (120 mm) - 5.1 in (130 mm)
Front tire: Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP 120/70 ZR17
Rear tire: Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP 200/60 ZR17
Rear Wheel: 3 spokes forged aluminum alloy 6.00" x 17"
Front brake: Dual 330 mm semi-floating discs, radially mounted Brembo Monobloc Stylema® (M4.30) 4-piston calipers with Bosch Cornering ABS EVO
Rear brake: 245 mm disc, 2-piston caliper with Bosch Cornering ABS EVO

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse Drivetrain

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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The electronics suite bundles the Ducati Power Launch system, Traction Control, Wheelie Control, Slide Control and Engine Brake Control together with variable delivery Power Modes for complete control of the bike and its impressive performance profile.

Power comes from a liquid-cooled, Desmosedici Stradale plant that runs with four cylinders set in a 90-degree “V” configuration to the tune of 214 horsepower at 13 grand and 91.5 pound-feet at an even 10 grand. An 81 mm stroke and 53.5 mm stroke gives the mill its 1,103 cc displacement, and the compression ratio is almost beyond belief at 14-to-1. That said, I doubt you can run anything but proper racegas in this thing. It rocks a quartet of poppets per cylinder with Ducati’s signature Desmodromic valvetrain that replaces the traditional valve springs with a pull-closed cam. It’s a more complicated system, but it also prevents the harmonic valve-float inherent with the spring closure method.

A rearward-rotating crankshaft keeps the front wheel planted, and this is probably why there are no spoilers on the front end; it doesn’t need them. Elliptical throttle bodies manage the induction with variable-length funnels that deepen the torque well so the torque starts to develop lower in the rpm range.

Each cylinder has dual injectors that help maximize fuel atomization for complete, efficient combustion. Emission control gets a boost from a pair of catalytic converters and lambda sensors in the exhaust system. A slipper-style clutch couples engine power to the six-speed transmission for an extra layer of protection at the rear contact patch. Ducati’s Quick Shift feature lets you shift both up and down the range without touching the clutch or even easing off on the throttle for blistering fast acceleration and controlled engine braking.

The ride-by-wire throttle sends the signal from the right grip, but that’s just the beginning of the engine management. The electronics suite bundles the Ducati Power Launch system, Traction Control, Wheelie Control, Slide Control and Engine Brake Control together with variable delivery Power Modes for complete control of the bike and its impressive performance profile.

Engine: Desmosedici Stradale 90° V4, rearward-rotating crankshaft, 4 Desmodromically actuated valves per cylinder, liquid cooled
Displacement: 1,103 cc
Bore x Stroke: 81 mm x 53.5 mm
Compression ratio: 14.0:1
Power: 214 hp (157.5 kW) @ 13,000 rpm
Torque: 91.5 lb-ft (124.0 Nm) @ 10,000 rpm
Fuel injection: Electronic fuel injection system. Twin injectors per cylinder. Full ride-by-wire elliptical throttle bodies. Variable length intake system
Exhaust: 4-2-1-2 system, with 2 catalytic converters and 2 lambda probes
Gearbox: 6 speed with Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) up/down EVO
Primary drive: Straight cut gears; Ratio 1.80:1
Ratio: 1=38/14 2=36/17 3=33/19 4=32/21 5=30/22 6=30/24
Final drive: Chain; Front sprocket 16; Rear sprocket 41
Clutch: Hydraulically controlled slipper and self-servo wet multiplate clutch

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse Pricing

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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At $30k, MSRP puts the V4 S Corse well out of noob reach, which is just as well.

The 2019 Panigale V4 S Corse rolls for $29,995 to make it the second most-expensive entry in the top-displacement range. It comes in the racing livery as the only color option.

Safety Equipment: Riding Modes, Power Modes, Bosch Cornering ABS EVO, Ducati Traction Control (DTC) EVO, Ducati Wheelie Control (DWC) EVO, Ducati Slide Control (DSC), Engine Brake Control (EBC) EVO, Auto tire calibration
Standard Equipment: Ducati Power Launch (DPL), Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) up/down EVO, Full LED lighting with Daytime Running Light (DRL), Ducati Electronic Suspension (DES) EVO with Ohlins suspension and steering damper, Quick adjustment buttons, Lithium-ion battery, Auto-off indicators, Marchesini aluminum forged wheels
Additional Equipment: Passenger seat and footpegs kit
Warranty: 24 months unlimited mileage
Color: MotoGP Replica Livery
Price: $29,995

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse Competitor

2017 - 2018 Norton V4 RR
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2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse
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If Ducati has a clear advantage at any given point of comparison, it's in the ride-control electronics department.

Bikes like the Panigale V4 s Corse can be hard to shop for, but I think Norton has the answer in its race-tastic V4 RR that the builders claim is “THE TT racer reborn,” so let’s get to it.

Norton skips the flashy livery and keeps it both bespoke and basic with a black carbon-fiber finish that nevertheless speaks to a machine that’s focused on performance. The front fairing shares the ram-air feature with the Corse, and it looks like it spent just as much time in the windtunnel.

A bubble screen and clip-on bars form the same sort of rider’s triangle, too, and when you factor in the race-style solo seat, it’s clear that the Norton is built for the same kind of customer. Norton takes the adjustability of the frame geometry to the next level with an adjustable steering head and an adjustable swingarm pivot, so point for the “RR.” Öhlins’ adjustable suspension is a clear winner all around since that’s what the Norton uses as well.

Power comes from a 1,200 cc, 72-degree V4 plant with a claimed, if vague, 200-plus horsepower on tap against a very specific, 214 horsepower from the Duc. If you actually plan on hitting a track, the Norton has as an available option a full-titanium race exhaust that drops almost 20 pounds from the tally, but delivers another 10 ponies.

If Ducati has a clear advantage at any given point of comparison, it’s in the ride-control electronics department that is far more robust than that of the Norton. Technically, Ducati gets a win at the checkout as well against the $35,000 Norton, but I mean, at this price point, what’s another five grand?

He Said

“No doubt, this is a hell of a machine, and is probably beyond most of us as far as skill requirements go, but the fact that it’s a track-only bike will act as something of a firewall to keep the posers and wannabes away. That said, Ducati doesn’t disappoint with this, the new standard for its superbike line, and this ride is second only to the limited-edition “Speciale” model.”

She Said

My wife and fellow motorcycle writer, Allyn Hinton, says, “This is a tippy-toe bike for a lot of folks, but it’s surprisingly comfortable. Yeah, you’re leaned over a bit, but your legs aren’t as tight as you might expect. The exhaust sound is nice and the quick-shifter is awesome. I dunno what to say. This whole V4 line is really impressive and the V4 S Corse is probably as close as some folks will come to a real MotoGP bike.”

2019 Ducati Panigale V4 S Corse Specifications

Engine & Drivetrain:
Engine: Desmosedici Stradale 90° V4, rearward-rotating crankshaft, 4 Desmodromically actuated valves per cylinder, liquid cooled
Displacement: 1,103 cc
Bore x Stroke: 81 mm x 53.5 mm
Compression ratio: 14.0:1
Power: 214 hp (157.5 kW) @ 13,000 rpm
Torque: 91.5 lb-ft (124.0 Nm) @ 10,000 rpm
Fuel injection: Electronic fuel injection system. Twin injectors per cylinder. Full ride-by-wire elliptical throttle bodies. Variable length intake system
Exhaust: 4-2-1-2 system, with 2 catalytic converters and 2 lambda probes
Gearbox: 6 speed with Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) up/down EVO
Primary drive: Straight cut gears; Ratio 1.80:1
Ratio: 1=38/14 2=36/17 3=33/19 4=32/21 5=30/22 6=30/24
Final drive: Chain; Front sprocket 16; Rear sprocket 41
Clutch: Hydraulically controlled slipper and self-servo wet multiplate clutch
Chassis:
Frame: Aluminum alloy "Front Frame"
Front suspension: Öhlins NIX30 43 mm fully adjustable fork with TiN treatment. Electronic compression and rebound damping adjustment with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 event-based mode
Rear Suspension: Fully adjustable Öhlins TTX36 unit. Electronic compression and rebound damping adjustment with Öhlins Smart EC 2.0 event-based mode. Aluminum single-sided swingarm
Rake: 24.5°
Front wheel trail: 4 in (100 mm)
Wheel travel (front/rear): 4.7 in (120 mm) - 5.1 in (130 mm)
Front tire: Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP 120/70 ZR17
Rear tire: Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP 200/60 ZR17
Rear Wheel: 3 spokes forged aluminum alloy 6.00" x 17"
Front brake: Dual 330 mm semi-floating discs, radially mounted Brembo Monobloc Stylema® (M4.30) 4-piston calipers with Bosch Cornering ABS EVO
Rear brake: 245 mm disc, 2-piston caliper with Bosch Cornering ABS EVO
Dimensions & Capacities:
Curb weight: 430 lb (195 kg)
Seat height: 32.48 in (830 mm)
Wheelbase: 57.64 in (1,464 mm)
Fuel tank capacity: 4.23 gallons (16 l )
Fuel Economy: 34 mpg (6.9 l/100km)
Top Speed: 190 mph (est)
Number of seats: Dual seats
Details:
Safety Equipment: Riding Modes, Power Modes, Bosch Cornering ABS EVO, Ducati Traction Control (DTC) EVO, Ducati Wheelie Control (DWC) EVO, Ducati Slide Control (DSC), Engine Brake Control (EBC) EVO, Auto tire calibration
Standard Equipment: Ducati Power Launch (DPL), Ducati Quick Shift (DQS) up/down EVO, Full LED lighting with Daytime Running Light (DRL), Ducati Electronic Suspension (DES) EVO with Ohlins suspension and steering damper, Quick adjustment buttons, Lithium-ion battery, Auto-off indicators, Marchesini aluminum forged wheels
Additional Equipment: Passenger seat and footpegs kit
Warranty: 24 months unlimited mileage
Color: MotoGP Replica Livery
Price: $29,995

Further Reading

Norton V4 RR

ALLYN IMAGES: DO NOT DELETE
- image 850055

See our review of the Norton V4 RR.

Ducati 1299 Panigale R FE

2017 - 2019 Ducati 1299 Panigale R FE
- image 836910

See our review of the Ducati 1299 Panigale R FE.

Ducati Panigale V4 / V4 S / V4 Speciale

2018 - 2019 Ducati Panigale V4
- image 773931

See our review of the Ducati Panigale V4 / V4 S / V4 Speciale.

Ducati

ALLYN IMAGES: DO NOT DELETE
- image 792903

Read more Ducati news.

TJ Hinton
T.J got an early start from his father and other family members who owned and rode motorcycles, and by helping with various mechanical repairs throughout childhood. That planted a seed that grew into a well-rounded appreciation of all things mechanical, and eventually, into a formal education of same. Though primarily a Harley rider, he has an appreciation for all sorts of bikes and doesn't discriminate against any particular brand or region of origin. He currently holds an Associate's degree in applied mechanical science from his time at the M.M.I.  Read More
About the author

All images featured on this website are copyrighted to their respective rightful owners. No infringement is intended. Image Source: ducati.com, bhducati.com, nortonmotorcycles.com

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