Motorcycle concepts don’t get nearly the same amount of shine as their automotive counterparts. But any bike lover will tell you that our love for bike concepts runs deep. This weekend, the 2015 Osaka Motorcycle Show opens its doors and Honda is one of the manufacturers that’s expected to roll up with an army of concept bikes that may or may not be hints at potential models down the road.

One such prototype is the SFA Concept, which isn’t really entirely new, having already made an appearance at the Indonesia Motorcycle Show in October 2014. But apparently, that’s not stopping Honda from bringing the SFA Concept to another auto show, only this time, it’s going to be right in Honda’s proverbial backyard.

The Honda SFA Concept isn’t the only prototype that’s making an appearance at the Osaka Motorcycle Show. Honda’s also readying the CRF250 Rally Concept, an adventure bike based on the CRF250L and the RC213V-S, a road-going machine that’s said to share its main mechanism with the vaunted RC213V MotoGP works bike. Yep. The same one that Marc Marquez will be riding on his way to a potential third straight MotoGP title.

Needless to say, Honda’s coming to Osaka ready to impress and from the looks of what it’s got planned for the show, it’s got a few sick ones ready to for their turn in the spotlight.

Click “continue reading” to read more about the Honda SFA Concept.

  • 2015 Honda SFA Concept
  • Year:
    2015
  • Make:
  • Engine:
    inline-1
  • Displacement:
    1.0 L
  • Top Speed:
    90 mph
  • Price:
    4800 (Est.)

Design

2015 Honda SFA Concept Exterior
- image 621751

So what do we really know about the Honda SFA Concept. Well, Honda’s been surprisingly coy regarding specific details about the bike, although it did release a few drops of information about the bike.

In terms of design, the SFA fits the mold of a “concept bike.” It’s got a nice and glossy two-tone matte finish, acting as a sexy dress that brings out the curves in the bike’s design.

Extra points goes to Honda for the front guard, the dual-stacked headlights, and the high-rising side mirrors. These physical qualities of the SFA are right in the spirit of what a concept should be. At the very least, this bike’s design is a nice departure from models like the CB300F and its 500 counterpart as far as naked bike styling is concerned.

Chassis

Somewhat surprisingly, the few details that Honda let out about the SFA Concept revolved around the work it did on the bike’s chassis.

It’s entirely possible that Honda intentionally did that to showcase the SFA’s new chassis, which boasts of a steel trellis frame and what looks like an upside-down fork and a single-sided swingarm.

Is it possible that the Honda SFA Concept is actually showcasing a new chassis development that it plans on using on future models? I wouldn’t put it past the company, especially when you consider that its current naked bikes could use a new chassis themselves.

Don’t take my word for it, though. It’s merely a hunch, even though I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised if my guess ends up having some weight to it, no pun intended.

Drivetrain

So apparently, the Honda SFA Concept will feature a single-cylinder engine. Based on its looks and the company’s confirmation of its engine size, you can immediately rule out any thought of this bike being anything more than a small-displacement street fighter.

That’s the segment I think the SFA will be a part of. It makes sense, too, since that specific market is dominated by the likes of the KTM Dukes and even the Yamaha MT-125.

Honda has always had a presence there, but it’s probably not as big as the company would want. A possible solution to that conundrum is a new model that can compete against the said titans of the segment.

The Honda SFA certainly fits that mold, and with a one-cylinder engine in the mix, I wouldn’t rule out the possibility that Honda builds a new small-displacement road warrior that can potentially - and dramatically - shift the market altogether.

Pricing

Ok, let’s be real. Don’t get your hopes up about a price for the SFA Concept. It’s still a concept, after all. But if it does enter the market, and I really hope it does, a production version of the SFA Concept could carry a price of about €4,500. Base that on current exchange rates and you get close to $4,800.

Again, don’t take this to the bank. I’m simply making my best estimate here based on the market price of some of its competitors.

Will We See It Hit Production?

That’s the dream, or at least the plan for Honda. It is a little curious that Honda would bring the SFA Concept to another auto show after already debuting the model in Indonesia back in Ocrtober 2014.

What this tells me is that Honda thinks that it may have something with the SFA. It’s not entirely sure what that "something" is, but I’m willing to bet that it involves gauging the Japanese market to see whether the concept really has the legs to get turned into a production model.

Cross your fingers.

Press Release

< World Premiere Concept model >

・1 model

*To be exhibited at both the Osaka and Tokyo Motorcycle Shows

< Concept models (exhibition models) >

  • CRF250 RALLY - An adventure model based on the CRF250L with styling image inspired by the CRF450 RALLY. <World premiere>
  • SFA - Street-fighter style light-weight motorcycle with a single cylinder engine mounted on a trellis frame.

< Prototype models (exhibition models) >

  • RC213V-S - The ultimate road-going motorcycle sharing its main mechanism with the RC213V MotoGP works machine.
  • True Adventure - Prototype model incorporating the racing technology of CRF450 RALLY HRC works machine.

< Racing model (exhibition model) >

  • RC213V - 2014 MotoGP class world title winning works machine.

< Production models >

Production models at the exhibition focus on recent models such as the CB series, Gold Wing, VFR800X and GROM. Displayed models will be equipped with aftermarket parts such as dress-up accessories ideal for various lifestyles.

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Press release
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