Suzuki put a new fuel-injected engine in the GSX-S750 for an even more thrilling ride

Suzuki shuffled its “standard” selections ahead of MY2019 with a new powerplant based on the proven Gixxer mill. The 2020 GSX-S750 comes sans ABS, but the lineup includes an ABS model in the custom-flavored, “Z” blackout package that the factory hopes will cover all the bases in the mid-size naked-sport sector. Additionally, it rocks a robust electronics suite with engine-control features as well as safety-related goodies. Power and agility (read: fun) come together with Spartan looks and a modicum of comfort on these bikes.

  • 2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
  • Year:
    2019- 2020
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    inline-4
  • Displacement:
    749 cc
  • Price:
    8499
  • Price:

Suzuki GSX-S750 Design

2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802150
2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802157
2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802154
It's good for folks who are looking for a sport-bike experience but would rather not be forced into the Superman/jockey riding position all the time.

Suzuki follows its new standard format that differs from the old-school standards because of its sport-bike bent. The looks may be different, but the intended use is the same; it’s meant to be a commuter, or a ride for folks who are looking for a sport-bike experience but would rather not be forced into the Superman/jockey riding position all the time.

A trim little fender controls the front-wheel fling and contributes to a low unsprung weight. It’s furthered by the new KYB inverted forks that see the heavier end of the assembly mounted to the tripletree. At the same time, they add some visual weight to the visage and lends it the suggestion of great strength and torsional resistance that plays right into the sporty aspect of the bike.

The cyclops headlight housing presents a rather Transformer-ish face to the world with stubby turn-signal standoffs and the suggestion of a bikini flyscreen up top. I’m not a fan of that look, but I’ll concede that it’s typical of the genre and move on.

Short-rise bars move the hand controls up and back toward the rider to form the short upper leg of the rather relaxed rider’s triangle, and that’s what gives you the comfortable upright position, but the jockey-mount foot controls are as high as ever to tuck your feet in nice and high. This pulls the legs into the pocket left by the wane at the rear of the 4.22-gallon fuel tank, and leaves the average-size rider in a great position to throw around some English in the turns.

The saddle and frame are similarly narrow where they meet the tank to give your thighs a break and make for an easy shot from hip-to-ground when it’s time to deploy your training wheels. Nose-down and tail-up, the subframe lofts the pillion and forms a butt-stop to keep the pilot’s derrière from sliding too far aft during hard acceleration, because you’d never need to rely on that to keep you aboard during a wheelie, right? (Wink nudge, guys.)

Out back, the taillight rides tucked up under the tip of the tail with a standoff-style mudguard mount for the tag and turn signals, and a secondary hugger that protects the backside of the drivetrain and the rear suspension. I feel like a full-on hugger and sideplate would look better, but there’s always the aftermarket for that.

A set of cheek fairings make a weak attempt at shrouding the radiator, but I gotta’ say I’m a fan of the chin fairing/bellypan that dresses the Gixxes up just a skosh beyond the mainstream naked bikes. Yeah, it’s small, but what a difference it makes to the overall look.

Suzuki GSX-S750 Chassis

2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802160
2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802159
2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802152
The S750 came with ABS last year, but for 2020, you have to get the S750Z if you want that feature.

The bones of the beast are an interesting point; the factory cross-bred a tubular-girder streetbike frame with a sportbike’s twin-spar skeleton to make a hybrid structure. A trapezoidal, beam-type swingarm articulates the rear wheel. It relies on a progressive-link monoshock with adjustable preload in conjunction with the usd KYB forks up front that also do their bit with adjustable preload values.

Symmetrical 17-inch wheels mount ZR-rated, Bridgestone Battlax Hypersport S21 radial hoops with a 120/70 up front followed by a 180/55 to round out the rolling chassis. A pair of four-piston Monobloc Nissin calipers bite dual 310 mm front discs with a single-pot anchor out back. The S750 came standard with ABS, though the 750Z did not in 2019. For 2020, Suzuki did a switcheroo and put ABS on the 750Z.

Seat height is manageable at 32.2-inches off the deck, and with the narrow waist there will be no excess bulk to deal with, so it should be manageable for all but the shortest inseams.

Suspension, Front: Inverted telescopic, coil spring, oil damped
Suspension, Rear: Link type, single shock, coil spring, oil damped
Brakes, Front: Nissin, 4-piston, twin disc, (S750 ABS: ABS-equipped)
Brakes, Rear: Nissin, 1-piston, single disc, (S750 ABS: ABS-equipped)
Tire, Front: 120/70ZR17M/C (58W), tubeless
Tire, Rear: 180/55ZR17M/C (73W), tubeless

Suzuki GSX-S750 Drivetrain

2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802151
2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802156
2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802150
The power-to-weight ratio is sure to deliver some thrilling acceleration for your riding enjoyment.

Suzuki reached back in time to the 2005 Gixxer 750 for the inspiration — indeed the layout — of the current powerplant. The K-5 generation mill contributes to the short chassis design, and the factory took steps to maximize output, such as strategic vents that help to reduce pumping losses as the air within the cases gets shoved around by the piston motion.

A high-capacity/low resistance intake enables high-volume aspiration with a little help from Suzuki’s proprietary Dual Throttle Valve throttle bodies. One set of butterflies are actuated by the throttle, and the other is controlled by the ECM that works to reconcile the difference between rider demand and what the engine can smoothly deliver. Additionally, the Throttle-body Integrated Idle Speed Control helps stabilize the engine and reduce emissions, and the Low RPM Assist allows for smooth transitions and stable revs along with a little built-in anti-stall insurance. As cool as all that is, it’s the four-mode Traction control that takes the cake with three, preset intervention profiles plus an “Off” setting if you’ve got the chops for it.

It’s liquid-cooled, so you can count on relatively stable engine temps, and while that’s great for emission control it’s also good to keep you from getting roasted alive every time you come to a stop. There’s four 72 mm bores with a markedly short 46 mm stroke that gives the mill a total displacement of 749 cc with a smokin’ hot 12.3-to-1 compression ratio that’ll require nothing less than road champagne.

That liquid gold will flow through ten-hole injector nozzles meant to maximize fuel atomization, which helps with power, fuel mileage and emissions for the full trifecta of benefits. Dual over-head cams time the poppets with a digital ignition system to fire iridium-type spark plugs for positive flame-front propagation. Power flows through a standard wet clutch and the six-speed transmission before heading down the chain final drive to the rear wheel. The tranny shafts (no giggety) come stacked vertically “race-style,” and that contributes to the short overall drivetrain.

How does it all shake out? Well, you can count on something in the neighborhood of 110-horsepower with a 465-pound curb weight and some thrilling acceleration for your riding enjoyment. If that ain’t enough, you’re looking at the wrong kind of bike, mate.

Engine: 749 cc, 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, 4-cylinder, DOHC
Bore x Stroke: 72.0 mm x 46.0 mm (2.834 in. x 1.811 in.)
Compression Ratio: 12.3:1
Fuel System: Suzuki fuel injection with SDTV
Starter: Electric
Ignition Electronic ignition (transistorized)
Lubrication: Wet sump
Transmission: 6-speed constant mesh
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate type
Final Drive: Chain, RK 525, 114 links

Suzuki GSX-S750 Pricing

2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802162
2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802155
2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802158
MSRP on the S750 is just under $8.5k, which isn't bad considering the electronics package you get.

The 2020 GSX-S750 rolls for $8,499, and the “Z” model with ABS will set you back a mere $8,899.

Warranty: 12 month unlimited mileage limited warranty (extended warranty through Suzuki Extended Protection)
Color:
└ 2019: GSX-S750 ABS: Pearl Glacier White, GSX-S750Z: Metallic Matte Black No.2
└ 2020: GSX-S750: Metallic Matte Black No. 2, GSX-S750Z ABS:Glass Sparkle Black/Pearl Glacier White
Price:
└ 2019: GSX-S750 ABS: $8,899, GSX-S750Z: $8,499
└ 2020: GSX-S750: $8,499, GSX-S750Z ABS: $8,899

Suzuki GSX-S750 Competitors

2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z
- image 802163
2018 - 2019 Yamaha MT-09
- image 754300
So close in features and price, it'll come down to a test drive and which has the looks you like better.

There’s no shortage of likely candidates from which to choose, but I want to hit up Yamaha for its recently-renamed (over here, anyway) MT-09 for my head-to-head, so here we go.

Yamaha MT-09

2018 - 2019 Yamaha MT-09
- image 799897

Right off the bat you’ll notice the Yamaha is more of a proper naked. It carries the bare minimum of body coverage with only a minimal radiator shroud and a few vanity covers to hide the steering head above a bare-arse-naked drivetrain that leads the way with exposed exhaust headers and nothing else. Yeah, it’s clean, but I like that chin fairing the Gixxes totes. Maybe that’s just me, but there it is.

While I’m not a huge fan of the Gixxes’ headlight housing, I like it loads better than the bug-like thing on the front of the MT-09, so score another point for the GSX-S. Yamaha does get one thing right; the rear end is made clean by the one-side hugger that mounts the plate down low and eliminates the need for a hangey-downey mudguard, and I do like that.

Yamaha brings the pain with fully-adjustable, inverted front forks paired with a monoshock that boasts adjustable rebound-damping in addition to the obligatory preload adjustment. ABS comes standard on the MT as it does with the S750Z for 2020.

Yamaha powers its entry with its CP3 “Crossplane” triple that manages a total of 847 cc, and it comes with much the same electronics as the Gixxess, so neither really gain anything here. At $8,999, the MT-09 is only a single bill higher, and that’s just a drop in the bucket at this point.

Read our full review of the Yamaha MT-09.

He Said

“Looks alone are enough to steer me toward the Gixxess if I’m honest. It’s muscular yet compact with a dark streak that is underpinned by the ample blackout treatment no matter which model you choose, though the “Z” is decidedly darker to be sure. Although it rocks many of the modern safety features, this is not a beginner’s bike, and you’d better respect it.”

She Said

My wife and fellow motorcycle writer, Allyn Hinton, says, “You know this bike is no slouch when you consider that originally the engine came from the GSX-R750 and it’s never looked back. Handling is much improved with the shorter chassis, and considering the price point, there’s some really nice electronics in here.”

Suzuki GSX-S750 Specifications

Engine & Drivetrain:
Engine: 749 cc, 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, 4-cylinder, DOHC
Bore x Stroke: 72.0 mm x 46.0 mm (2.834 in. x 1.811 in.)
Compression Ratio: 12.3:1
Fuel System: Suzuki fuel injection with SDTV
Starter: Electric
Ignition Electronic ignition (transistorized)
Lubrication: Wet sump
Transmission: 6-speed constant mesh
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate type
Final Drive: Chain, RK 525, 114 links
Chassis:
Suspension, Front: Inverted telescopic, coil spring, oil damped
Suspension, Rear: Link type, single shock, coil spring, oil damped
Brakes, Front: Nissin, 4-piston, twin disc (S750 ABS: ABS-equipped)
Brakes, Rear: Nissin, 1-piston, single disc, (S750 ABS: ABS-equipped)
Tire, Front: 120/70ZR17M/C (58W), tubeless
Tire, Rear: 180/55ZR17M/C (73W), tubeless
Dimensions & Capacities:
Overall Length: 2,125 mm (83.6 in.)
Overall Width: 785 mm (30.9 in.)
Overall Width 1044 mm (41.5 in.)
Wheelbase: 1,455 mm (57.2 in.)
Ground Clearance: 135 mm (5.3 in.)
Seat Height: 820 mm (32.2 in.)
Curb Weight: 213 kg (470 lb.)
Fuel Tank Capacity: 16.0 L (4.22 US gallons)
Electricals:
Headlight: 12V 60/55W H4
Tail Light: LED
Details:
Warranty: 12 month unlimited mileage limited warranty (extended warranty through Suzuki Extended Protection)
Color:
└ 2019: GSX-S750 ABS: Pearl Glacier White, GSX-S750Z: Metallic Matte Black No.2
└ 2020: GSX-S750: Metallic Matte Black No. 2, GSX-S750Z ABS:Glass Sparkle Black/Pearl Glacier White
Price:
└ 2019: GSX-S750 ABS: $8,899, GSX-S750Z: $8,499
└ 2020: GSX-S750: $8,499, GSX-S750Z ABS: $8,899

Further Reading

Suzuki

ALLYN IMAGES: DO NOT DELETE
- image 788898

Read more Suzuki news.

TJ Hinton
T.J got an early start from his father and other family members who owned and rode motorcycles, and by helping with various mechanical repairs throughout childhood. That planted a seed that grew into a well-rounded appreciation of all things mechanical, and eventually, into a formal education of same. Though primarily a Harley rider, he has an appreciation for all sorts of bikes and doesn't discriminate against any particular brand or region of origin. He currently holds an Associate's degree in applied mechanical science from his time at the M.M.I.  Read More
About the author

All images featured on this website are copyrighted to their respective rightful owners. No infringement is intended. Image Source: suzukicycles.com, yamaha-motor.com

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