Restyled, but still clearly Hayabusa

LISTEN 10:42

Suzuki rolls into 2021 with its newly-improved-for-MY2022 ambassador model for the sportbike world; the inimitable [Hayabusa->mot. Windtunnel-tested fairing tweaks seek to further improve penetration and reduce drag so you can get the most out of the next-generation in-line four. A beefed-up, model-unique electronics suite helps improve rider safety and control with a new ride-by-wire throttle system that supports a number of the new engine-control features.

  • 2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
  • Year:
    2022
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    inline-4
  • Displacement:
    1340 cc
  • Top Speed:
    190 mph (Est.)
  • Price:
    18599
  • Price:

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa Design

  • Restyled look, but still undeniably Hayabusa
  • LED lighting
  • TFT LCD display
  • Newly designed handlebar controls
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971154
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971153

The design team for the new Hayabusa had its work cut out for it from the get-go. You don’t simply redesign something with a look as iconic as the earlier ’Busa versions, yet that’s just what the factory did and they managed to maintain much of the flyline and visual weight long associated with this family. Just a nip here and tuck there, and voila, you have a leaner and meaner machine that’s still clearly a member of the Hayabusa family line, just with less-voluptuous curves than the previous body styles.

The characteristic tail hump that long defined the ass end of the ’Busa bikes remains the dominant feature. To keep the rear end clean, the factory crammed the new taillight, brake light, and turn signals all into a single LED lightbar that spans the width of the tail section. Back up front, a series of new adjustments in the cowl vents steer the hot air away from the pilot and deliver low-drag reintegration with the slipstream.

In spite of the tweaks to the body panels, the ’Busa maintains the peregrine falcon-inspired panache that sets the line apart from everything else on two wheels. Not only is the body slimmer, but the mufflers saw some bulk trimmed away as well to match the leaner overall lines. The cowling and fairings are all windtunnel tested thoroughly to minimize drag and boost penetration, but that’s not all they do. A pair of inlet ports ride abreast of the stacked front headlight to take advantage of the ram-air effect. This delivers pressurized air into the Suzuki Ram Air Direct system for a built-in boost to volumetric efficiency and a concurrent performance gain. In full disclosure, the ram-air effect is negligible at lower speeds with the full benefits being felt at something upwards of 80 mph.

LED headlight projectors ensure good two-way visibility with the rest of the world, and the LED front turn signals come integrated with the front fairing to reduce drag and streamline the look. Dead-short bars pull the pilot into an aggressive, forward-leaning position with jockey pegs and a narrow waist, though the bar is pulled back 12 mm than it was previously for a little more touring comfort.

The skinny midsection rides behind a broad-shouldered cowling effectively pulling the rider’s legs into the bike, instead of just around it, for a feeling of man-machine integration.

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa Chassis

  • Lighter weight than previous gen
  • Combined brakes and Slope Dependent brake control
  • Adjustable KYB suspension
  • Motion Track ABS
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971157
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971150
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971149

Aluminum is the material of choice for the new twin-spar frame on the Hayabusa that lends the finished product a lower center-of-gravity with 50:50 weight distribution between the front and rear axles. Stock wheelbase is fairly compact with 58.3 inches between contact-patch centers, though since this bike is popular around the drag strips you can expect to see them out there with a stretched swingarm and significantly longer wheelbase.

Curb weight is 582 pounds, so the ’Busa rates dual front discs with new, four-piston Brembo calipers for the bulk of the stopping power opposite a single-piston Nissin caliper out back with stock ABS protection front and rear. A six-axis inertial measurement unit enables a Motion Track ABS feature that modulates its intervention based on the calculated available traction for continuous protection around the curve.

Additionally, the brakes come with a Combined Brake feature that delivers pressure to the calipers at both ends according to pressure at the front brake lever and a Slope Dependent brake control that keep you from going ass over appetite when braking head-first downhill. It also has Hill Hold Control that holds the rear brake and allows you to put both feet down when stopped on a grade. The HHC holds the brake for you until released, at which point the system smoothly eases up on the brake pressure as you come out of the hole. Needless to say, the ability to nail the holeshot is a very desirable trait for a drag-bike/stoplight burner such as this.

Handling and ride-quality control falls to fully-adjustable KYB forks up front opposite a shock hidden under the tail, both with long-service DLC treatment at the wear points that extends component life considerably.

Suspension Front: Inverted telescopic, coil spring, oil damped
Suspension Rear: Link type, single shock, coil spring, oil damped
Brakes Front: Brembo Stylema, 4-piston, twin disc, ABS-equipped
Brakes Rear: Nissin, 1-piston, single disc, ABS-equipped
Tires Front: 120/70ZR17M/C (58W), tubeless
Tires Rear: 190/50ZR17M/C (73W), tubeless

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa Drivetrain

  • Fully re-engineered 1,340 cc engine
  • Cruise control and active speed limiter
  • Effortless acceleration
  • Proprietary Ride-by-Wire Electronic throttle body system
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971141
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971157
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971155

The electronic fandanglery continues on the Hayabusa well into the engine control area via Suzuki’s Intelligent Ride System that bundles all the fandanglery together under one banner. It starts out with a new ride-by-wire throttle control that conveys rider demand to the brain box. From there, the signal is modified by a number of variables and handful of on-board sub-systems.

First among the SIRS features is a trio of Drive Mode power-delivery profiles plus a fourth rider-tuneable profile that you can set up for a power curve all your own. The Drive Mode tunes more than the final output, much more, with Power Mode, Engine Brake Control, Anti-Lift control, lean-sensitive traction control, and a quickshifter that’ll send you both up and down the range without touching the clutch lever or even rolling off the throttle for solid holeshots and controlled quarter miles.

If you do feel the need to actually use the hand lever, the slip-and-assist clutch ensures a light pull with built-in backtorque mitigation for additional safety on hard downshifts and engine-braking actions. A six-speed transmission crunches the ratios to deliver a top speed around 190 mph, but if you don’t trust yourself with that kind of power, you can set the Launch Control for smooth, tractable take-offs and the Active Speed Limiter for an absolute performance ceiling to keep you from overdoing it on public roads.

As for the mechanical bits, the liquid-cooled powerplant comes in an inline-four configuration that’s mounted transversely in the frame. Bore and stroke mic out at 81 mm and 65 mm respectively for an overall displacement of 1,340 cc with a smokin’ hot 12.5-to-1 compression ratio. Dual overhead cams time the valvetrain and come ground this year for a broader torque band. How much broader? It’s hard to say as the factory is keeping those figures close to the vest, but the previous version produced 197 ponies with 114 pounds of grunt and I’m reasonably confident that those numbers hold or improve with this newest Hayabusa lump.

Even the more mundane features are noteworthy. Hidden away in the cases are larger oil galleries that deliver more volume to the tune of a whopping 54-percent more flow to the critical components. Cutouts in the bottom end vent air pressure between cylinders to limit pumping losses. Each cylinder comes with a Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber that maximizes flame-front propagation through turbulence in the intake. The slipper pistons weigh in at 26 grams lighter than the previous version along with connecting rods that dropped three grams a piece. These new lightweight pieces join with a lightened crankshaft and gear-driven balancer to reduce the vibration felt by the pilot, which is no mean feat with an engine as powerful as this. Plus the reduced mass comes with a concurrent reduction in inertia, so this engine will rev up more quickly than ever before.

Engine: 1,340 cc, 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, inline-4-cylinder, DOHC
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 mm x 65.0 mm (3.19 in. x 2.56 in.)
Compression Ratio: 12.5:1
Fuel System: Fuel injection with Ride-by-Wire throttle bodies
Starter: Electric
Lubrication: Wet sump
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate type, SCAS-equipped
Transmission: 6-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Drive chain, RK GB50GSVZ5, 114L

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa Price

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971146
2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971142

The 2022 Hayabusa comes in a trio of paint packages: Glass Sparkle Black & Candy Burnt Gold, Metallic Matte Sword Silver & Candy Daring Red, or Pearl Brilliant White & Metallic Matte Stellar Blue. Base MSRP is rolling out at $18,599.

Model ID: GSX1300RRQM2
Warranty: 12-month unlimited mileage limited warranty, Longer coverage periods with other benefits are available through Suzuki Extended Protection (SEP)
Color: Glass Sparkle Black & Candy Burnt Gold, Metallic Matte Sword Silver & Candy Daring Red, or Pearl Brilliant White & Metallic Matte Stellar Blue
Price: $18,599

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa Competitors

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa
- image 971147
2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP
- image 874323
2019 - 2021 Kawasaki Ninja H2 SX SE+
- image 826240

Nothing else in the world strikes quite the same figure as Suzuki’s Hayabusa line, so it’s in a league of its own in the looks department and a blank canvas ripe for customization. However, aside from custom bike builders, most ’Busa buyers are interested in the performance aspect of this machine, and with that in mind we can certainly find bikes with similar performance profiles.

I stuck with Suzuki’s domestic foes and picked the CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP from Honda’s lineup.

Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP

2021 Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade SP
- image 874305

The Fireblade is Honda’s flagship street-racer with a 215-horsepower engine and 186 mph top speed, so like the ’Busa, this bike is well placed in the stupidfast category. Suzuki comes out ahead at the checkout against the Fireblade’s $28,500 starting price.

Kawasaki’s Ninja H2 SX SE+

2019 - 2021 Kawasaki Ninja H2 SX SE+
- image 826212

If speed is your absolute top priority, then Kawasaki’s Ninja H2 SX SE+ may be your Huckleberry. A one-liter (998 cc to be precise) cranks out 230 horsepower and 84.6 pound-feet with a top speed around 209 mph. Electronics are pretty much a wash, though the real selling point with the Kawi is the supercharger that boosts volumetric efficiency and brings a significant boost in power. At $25,500, you’ll have to decide if that extra speed is worth it. Bear in mind; you’ll never do either bike justice on public roads.

Read our full review of the Honda CBR1000RR-R Fireblade.
Read our full review of the Kawasaki Ninja H2 SX SE+.

He Said

“The Hayabusa is, in my humble opinion, a great drag bike and an inspiring platform for custom builders. It’s also my opinion that it’s more fun to ride a slow bike fast than it is to ride a fast bike slow, and the temptation to roll on and blast anything and everything else on the road may be too strong for many mere mortals to resist. If you aren’t into racing it, you can count on it serving as a conspicuous consumption with oodles of curb appeal.

She Said

My wife and fellow motorcycle writer, Allyn Hinton, says, “There is just so much to talk about on a Hayabusa to begin with, and it’s even moreso with this next generation. The electronics are the top-notch of top-notchedness. It always was an agile monster and changes to the chassis make it more of that, plus better stability at low speeds, lighter weight, and more comfortable. Also noteworthy, at least for us height-challenged folks, the seat height was lowered to 31.5 inches, which is really low for a sportbike. I never was one for the stupidfast bikes — more power to you for the folks that are — but from a technological perspective, the Hayabusa is just marvelous.”

2022 Suzuki Hayabusa Specifications

Engine & Drivetrains:
Engine: 1,340 cc, 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, inline-4-cylinder, DOHC
Bore x Stroke: 81.0 mm x 65.0 mm (3.19 in. x 2.56 in.)
Compression Ratio: 12.5:1
Fuel System: Fuel injection with Ride-by-Wire throttle bodies
Starter: Electric
Lubrication: Wet sump
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate type, SCAS-equipped
Transmission: 6-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Drive chain, RK GB50GSVZ5, 114L
Chassis:
Suspension Front: Inverted telescopic, coil spring, oil damped
Suspension Rear: Link type, single shock, coil spring, oil damped
Brakes Front: Brembo Stylema, 4-piston, twin disc, ABS-equipped
Brakes Rear: Nissin, 1-piston, single disc, ABS-equipped
Tires Front: 120/70ZR17M/C (58W), tubeless
Tires Rear: 190/50ZR17M/C (73W), tubeless
Dimensions & Capacities:
Overall Length: 85.8 in. (2,180 mm)
Overall Width: 28.9 in. (735 mm)
Overall Height: 45.9 in. (1,165 mm)
Wheelbase: 58.3 in. (1,480 mm)
Ground Clearance: 125 mm (4.9 in.)
Seat Height: 31.5 in. (800 mm)
Curb Weight: 582 lb. (264 kg)
Fuel Tank Capacity: 5.3 US gal.(20.0 L)
Electrics:
Ignition: Electronic ignition (transistorized)
Spark Plug: NGK CR9EIA-9 (or DENSO IU27D)
Headlight: Multi-plane and projector LED
Tail Light: LED
Details:
Model ID: GSX1300RRQM2
Warranty: 12-month unlimited mileage limited warranty, Longer coverage periods with other benefits are available through Suzuki Extended Protection (SEP)
Color: Glass Sparkle Black & Candy Burnt Gold, Metallic Matte Sword Silver & Candy Daring Red, or Pearl Brilliant White & Metallic Matte Stellar Blue
Price: $18,599

Further Reading

Suzuki

ALLYN IMAGES: DO NOT DELETE
- image 788898

Read more Suzuki news.

TJ Hinton
TJ Hinton
T.J got an early start from his father and other family members who owned and rode motorcycles, and by helping with various mechanical repairs throughout childhood. That planted a seed that grew into a well-rounded appreciation of all things mechanical, and eventually, into a formal education of same. Though primarily a Harley rider, he has an appreciation for all sorts of bikes and doesn't discriminate against any particular brand or region of origin. He currently holds an Associate's degree in applied mechanical science from his time at the M.M.I.  Read full bio
About the author

All images featured on this website are copyrighted to their respective rightful owners. No infringement is intended. Image Source: suzukicycles.com, kawasaki.com, honda.com

Press release

Related Articles

2018 - 2021 Yamaha YZF-R1 / R1M

2017 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

2021 Damon Hypersport HS

2020 Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR

2020 Ducati Panigale V4

What do you think?
Show Comments
Motorcycle Finder: