Significant upgrades including more power & more torque

LISTEN 10:05

Triumph’s Street Scrambler made a splash when it hit the market a couple of years ago, and the factory rolled out a fresh, new generation for the 2019 model year. That’s right; the “SS” brings more yummy-goodness to the table with an updated look to go with a whole passel of improved electronic features that turn this classic into a thoroughly modern ride. It isn’t all about the visuals and hang-on gear either, the powerplant generates 18% more fun (or power, if you insist) for your riding enjoyment. Really, it would almost be easier to tell you what isn’t new, but that’s not why they feed me, so let’s dig into this new Triumph and see if we can find a suitable competitor for it.

  • 2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
  • Year:
    2019- 2020
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    Flat twin
  • Top Speed:
    125 mph
  • Price:
    17695
  • Price:

Triumph Street Scrambler Design

  • Dynamic scrambler ergonomics
  • LED lighting
  • LCD multi-function display
  • Available low seat height
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799944
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799951
Even though it's geared more toward road than trail, it is still a scrambler and it pays its dues as the grand-daddy of all dual sports.

The factory claims to have made the new Street Scrambler look more modern, and I guess that’s true as far as it goes, but if you ask me they just moved from the ’60s into the ’70s for the target era. Wire wheels get the party started right, and the rwu front forks and bellowed gaiters reinforced the dated visage. It’s no accident that two out of three of those bits play right into real-world off-road capabilities. Even though it’s geared more toward road than trail, it is still a scrambler and it pays its dues as the grand-daddy of all dual sports.

To prove my point, the redesigned front mudguard is set with enough clearance to work with dual-surface hoops. A single round headlight can leaves the front end clean and classy, as does the single round clock up top that contains and displays all the instrumentation through an analog speedo, LCD screen and indicator lights. The housing is updated with a new bezel and fresh details that come paired with a new dial face to give the instruments a bold new look. (Sorry Honda, gotta’ borrow that from you.)

A 3.1-gallon gas tank hits a historical high note with a teardrop shape and an updated paint scheme that has Matte Khaki green over Aluminum Silver with a black border, Fusion White, and my favorite, Cranberry Red. Under it all runs a common blackout thread to channel the darkly custom underbelly of bike culture. The classic knee-pockets with black rubber kneepads could be torn from a history book.

An almost-flat bench seat runs with a slight rise to the interchangeable p-pad/luggage rack and a new “adventure-oriented” finish that sets it apart from the previous gen. Removable passenger footpegs make it easy to strip down for serious solo off-road work (no giggety), and the new stock bash plate lends its protection to the engine and frame for some real terrain-tackling capabilities. A high rear mudguard carries the LED taillight as well as the winkers and plateholder, but it’s the shotgun exhaust that really sells the old-school panache, and you can go ahead and pencil me in as a fan.

Triumph Street Scrambler Chassis

  • Improved cartridge forks
  • Switchable ABS
  • New Brembo 4-piston caliper
  • Precise handling
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799940
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799947
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799948
You can expect a rather nimble ride and a certain eagerness and flickability in the corners.

Tubular-steel members make up the double-downtube/double-cradle structure on the Street Scrambler that completely supports the powerplant and provides a bit of protection as well. Triumph stuck with the ferrous framework for the two-side, yoke-style swingarm as well, and that brings with it a certain peace of mind and confidence that feels good when you’re afield, off and away from the more civilized roads.

The 41 mm, KYB front forks come set a bit wider now for a mainly aesthetic change. Unfortunately, the cartridge-style stems are still non-adjustable, so there’s definitely some room for improvement. Out back, dual coil-over KYB shocks float the rear end on the same 4.72 inches of travel as the front with adjustable preload as the only ride-quality tweak.

Also new is the four-piston Brembo caliper up front that bites a single, 310 mm disc to provide the bulk of the stopping power. Out back, a twin-piston anchor and 255 mm disc does its bit with switchable ABS protection that casts its safety net under both ends of the bike. Laced rims strike a very offroad-tastic note, and they mount a 100/90-19 and 150/70-17 hoop on the front and rear, respectively.

Sure, the stock tires reflect a blacktop bent, but you can peel them off in favor of some dual-surface hoops to turn the SS into something of a Jack-of-All ride, just as a proper scrambler should do. The steering geometry is indicative of a rather nimble ride with 25.6 degrees of rake and 4.29 inches of trail, so you can count on a certain eagerness and flickability in the corners.

Frame: Tubular steel cradle
Swingarm: Twin-sided, tubular steel
Front Suspension: KYB 41mm forks, non-adjustable with cartridge damping, 4.7 in (120 mm) travel
Rear Suspension: KYB twin RSUs, with pre-load adjustment, 4.7 in (120 mm) rear wheel travel.
Rake: 25.6 º
Trail: 4.3 in (109 mm)
Front Brakes: Single 310 mm floating disc Brembo four piston fixed caliper, ABS
Rear Brakes: Single 255 mm disc. Nissin 2-piston floating caliper, ABS
Front Wheel: Spoked, 2.5 x 19 in
Rear Wheel: Spoked, 4.25 x 17 in
Front Tire: 100/90-19
Rear Tire: 150/70 R17

Triumph Street Scrambler Drivetrain

  • Higher-revving 900 cc engine
  • Ride modes
  • Significantly increased power and torque
  • Switchable traction control
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799941
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799955
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799954
There's something inherently attractive about raw power, it's true, so the extra 10-ponies are quite sexy, indeed.

As much as the Street Scrambler has going on so far, the powerplant improvements still manage to steal the show. There’s something inherently attractive about raw power, it’s true, so the extra (roughly) 10-ponies are quite sexy, indeed. That brings the total power up to 64.1 horsepower, and since some of the internal components such as the crankshaft and balance shafts are lightened for the 2019 update, the redline was skooched up another half-a-grand to 7,500 rpm. Torque maxes out at a low 3,200 rpm with 59 pound-feet on tap, and that is plenty to launch the 447-pound (dry) Street Scrambler out of the hole with speed and quickness added liberally thereunto.

It has four-valve heads with lightweight SOHC actuation and a 900 cc total displacement. Ride-by-Wire throttle control works with the dual throttle bodies that feed the water-cooled parallel-twin, and that brings us to the engine-management magic that Triumph added to make a new first-in-class combination of tech.

First, you have a choice between two different riding modes — Road and Rain — that let you dial in power delivery according to conditions. Next, a switchable traction control feature helps you keep from breaking the rear wheel loose on acceleration, and a torque-assist clutch prevents excessive backtorque from breaking it loose when engine braking, so you’ve got protection coming and going. A five-speed transmission keeps you in the (generous) powerband and sends power to the rear wheel via a tough-as-balls chain final drive.

Engine: Liquid cooled, 8 valve, SOHC, 270° crank angle parallel twin
Displacement: 900 cc
Bore x Stroke: 84.6 mm x 80 mm
Compression: 11.0:1
Max Power EC: 64.1 hp (47.8 kW) @ 7,500 rpm
Max Torque EC: 59 lb-ft (80 Nm) @ 3,200 rpm
System: Ride by wire, multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection
Exhaust: Brushed 2-into-2 exhaust system with twin high level brushed silencers
Final Drive: O ring chain
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate assist clutch
Gearbox: 5-speed

Triumph Street Scrambler Pricing

2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799942
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799953
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799950
Price is TBA as of this writing, but I expect it to top $11k.

MSRP on the Street Scrambler is $11kPricing has yet to be announced as of this writing; expect to see something on November 23. Last year’s model rolled for $10,800, and I imagine the updates may elevate that price point by as much as a grand.

Instrument Display and Functions: LCD multi-functional instrument pack with analogue speedometer, engine rpm, odometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, range to empty indication, service indicator, clock, 2x trip, average & current fuel consumption display, traction control status display, heated grip ready - controlled by a handlebar mounted scroll button.
Color: Matt Khaki/Aluminium Silver, Cranberry Red, Fusion White
Price: White: $11,000, Color: $11,250, Two-tone: $11,500

Triumph Street Scrambler Competitors

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
- image 781152
2019 - 2020 Triumph Street Scrambler
- image 799956
The two aren't terribly different except in the small details, the strongest offset being found in the exhaust system.

Ducati’s own Scrambler line has gone from strength to strength lately with a host of additions and improvements over the last few years, so I decided to grab Duc’s Full Throttle for my head-to-head this time.

Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle
- image 781158

In the looks department, the two aren’t terribly different except in the small details, the strongest offset being found in the exhaust system. Trumpet runs a pair of dead-sexy shotgun pipes that really tie into past designs while the “FT” rocks a 2-into-1-into-2 system with upswept, snub-nose mufflers for a more modern look. I am a fan of the hugger over the FT’s rear wheel, and the lack of a large subframe-mount mudguard, though I can’t say it’s better than the SS’s arrangement. Both arrangements fit their respective bikes just fine.

The FT was designed to evoke images of flat-track performance, and to that end, I’d say job done. A tubular-steel Trellis frame supports the Duc with usd front forks that look tough but don’t come with any more adjustments than its British counterpart, same as the rear with only the obligatory spring-preload adjuster across the board.

Cast rims round out the rolling chassis, and Duc boosts its braking juice with corner-sensitive ABS that is a sight safer than vanilla ABS systems like the SS runs. Seems as though the FT’s anti-locks are non-switchable though, so that’s a mitigating factor for Triumph as far as brake safety goes.

Ducati surrenders some ground in the displacement department with only 803 cc in its L-Twin, Desmodromic powerplant. While the optics are bad on that, the truth is that the power numbers are a trade off with 73-horsepower and 49 pound-feet of torque from the FT versus 64.1-ponies and 59-pounds o’ grunt from the SS, so neither gain an advantage here.

Read our full review on the Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle.

He Said

“On paper, the two competitors are fairly close, and while I can’t quite qualify my position, I feel like the Triumph Street Scrambler is a little bit more bike for your buck. It’s definitely made for a more mature rider, it seems, and of course there’s just no getting away from the charm of a British twin. It’s not may favorite Bonneville-powered ride, but it’s running a close third.”

She Said

My wife and fellow motorcycle writer, Allyn Hinton, says, “There’s lots of new stuff this year. This is a significantly upgraded Bonneville engine: more power and torque, and higher revving. New Brembo brakes, riding modes, and switchable ABS and traction control....it’s a really nice upgrade. How can you not have knobbies on this is beyond me. I think it’s a very affordable bike with some very nice features that could make it your I just want to have fun bike.

Triumph Street Scrambler Specifications

Engine & Drivetrain:
Engine: Liquid cooled, 8 valve, SOHC, 270° crank angle parallel twin
Displacement: 900 cc
Bore x Stroke: 84.6 mm x 80 mm
Compression: 11.0:1
Max Power EC: 64.1 hp (47.8 kW) @ 7,500 rpm
Max Torque EC: 59 lb-ft (80 Nm) @ 3,200 rpm
System: Ride by wire, multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection
Exhaust: Brushed 2-into-2 exhaust system with twin high level brushed silencers
Final Drive: O ring chain
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate assist clutch
Gearbox: 5-speed
Chassis:
Frame: Tubular steel cradle
Swingarm: Twin-sided, tubular steel
Front Suspension: KYB 41mm forks, non-adjustable with cartridge damping, 4.7 in (120 mm) travel
Rear Suspension: KYB twin RSUs, with pre-load adjustment, 4.7 in (120 mm) rear wheel travel.
Rake: 25.6 º
Trail: 4.3 in (109 mm)
Front Brakes: Single 310 mm floating disc Brembo four piston fixed caliper, ABS
Rear Brakes: Single 255 mm disc. Nissin 2-piston floating caliper, ABS
Front Wheel: Spoked, 2.5 x 19 in
Rear Wheel: Spoked, 4.25 x 17 in
Front Tire: 100/90-19
Rear Tire: 150/70 R17
Dimensions & Capacities:
Width Handlebars: 32.9 in (835)
Height Without Mirror: 46.5 in (1,180 mm)
Seat Height: 31.1 in (790 mm)
Wheelbase: 56.9 in (1,445 mm)
Dry Weight: 447.5 lbs (203 kg)
Tank Capacity: 3.2 gal (12 l)
Fuel Consumption: 68.9 mpg (4.1 l/100 km)
Electricals:
Instrument Display and Functions: LCD multi-functional instrument pack with analogue speedometer, engine rpm, odometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, range to empty indication, service indicator, clock, 2x trip, average & current fuel consumption display, traction control status display, heated grip ready - controlled by a handlebar mounted scroll button.
Details:
Color: Matt Khaki/Aluminium Silver, Cranberry Red, Fusion White
Price: White: $11,000, Color: $11,250, Two-tone: $11,500

Further Reading

Triumph

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- image 791470

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TJ Hinton
TJ Hinton
T.J got an early start from his father and other family members who owned and rode motorcycles, and by helping with various mechanical repairs throughout childhood. That planted a seed that grew into a well-rounded appreciation of all things mechanical, and eventually, into a formal education of same. Though primarily a Harley rider, he has an appreciation for all sorts of bikes and doesn't discriminate against any particular brand or region of origin. He currently holds an Associate's degree in applied mechanical science from his time at the M.M.I.  Read full bio
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All images featured on this website are copyrighted to their respective rightful owners. No infringement is intended. Image Source: triumphmotorcycles.com, ducati.com

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