More power and more torque in the low range, it’s a whole new generation of Tiger

Triumph’s new Tiger 900 line covers an array of bases throughout its range, but while the base model and GT versions are built for urban touring/commuting, the Rally and Rally Pro are clearly geared toward off-road work. Long-stroke suspension components and laced wheels set the tone with the full spectrum of ride-quality and safety systems, several of which benefit from the IMU to deliver corner-optimized performance both on-road and off. All of this delightfulness rides on an all-new chassis with an also-new, 888 cc powerplant that cranks out 10-percent more grunt than the previous “800” to drive your multi-surface adventures.

  • 2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
  • Year:
    2020
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    inline-3
  • Displacement:
    888 cc
  • Top Speed:
    125 mph (Est.)

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro Design

  • 7-inch TFT display
  • My Triumph Connectivity (Pro model)
  • Four ride modes (Six on Pro model)
  • LED lighting
  • Heated saddle and pillion
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
- image 880233
As one of the contributors to the original adventure-bike design, it's no surprise that Triumph's Tiger 900 line fits the current mold to a “T.”

A sculpted front fender on the Tiger 900 Rally leads the way with multiple built-in functions in its design. Containing the front wheel fling is just the beginning. The fork foot-mounted uprights protect the exposed inner fork tubes from grit that would otherwise damage the seals. In a bid to maximize the heat-exchange rate, angled panels inside the supports work with the external foil shape to guide the slipstream to the twin radiators in the cowl scoop. Finally, it carries a minimal amount of material in the rearward half to keep unsprung weight low at the front axle. I know, that’s a lot to demand of such a mundane component, but here we are.

A wide bird’s beak fairing mounts the short standoff turn signals outboard of the new dual headlight/DRL arrangement with LED tech throughout to ensure safety and visibility under all ambient light conditions. Stock handguards join the clear, rally-style adjustable windscreen and wide cowling to punch a hole in the wind and form the rider’s pocket. Plus, it’s vented to relieve the vacuum behind the glass and prevent the wearisome head-buffet effect from occurring so you can extend your riding time.

The Rally and Rally Pro both come equipped with updated instrumentation in the form of its TFT multi-function display that measures a whopping seven-inches on the diagonal with an anti-glare design that delivers the goods in a wide variety of lighting and weather conditions. For a little lagniappe, the factory gave it a quartet of color schemes and information layouts to let you customize the delivery of the critical metrics and the ride-control systems alike.

A short-rise, blackout handlebar pushes your hands back a skosh so it delivers a comfortable upright riding posture and leaves open the possibility of operating it from a standing position for technical work. The radiator scoops open up with large trailing-side vents and use the suction of the slipstream to help the waste heat integrate with the flow for effective elimination. This is matched by a broad fuel tank flange that extends the rider’s protection to the upper-leg area. A camel’s-hump fuel tank defines the top of the flyline with a 5.28-gallon capacity that’ll give the Tiger more stamina than your butt can handle at a spell.

Subframe-mount passenger footpegs join the wide P-pad and J.C. handles to keep your riding buddy safe and comfortable, and at the terminus, more LED lighting finishes off the design with a plateholder/mudguard to prevent you from wearing that muddy stripe up your back.

In addition, the Rally Pro carries extra equipment specifically for off-road adventures. A pair of spotlights increase the forward lighting potential for added security in unknown territory. Down low, a set of engine guards protect the beating heart in a drop or slide, and the Pro version replaces the small stock belly pan with a proper bashplate for extra protection from terrain strikes.

For instrumentation, the Pro comes equipped with the new My Triumph wireless connectivity system that lets you field phonecalls and jam to your favorite tunes with real-time weather and turn-by-turn navigation to aid you in your ride planning. Plus, it networks with your GoPro if you like to film your riding adventures. Heated pilot and pillion seats come stock on the Pro to add to the heated handgrips that roll with the base Rally, and if you must have the heated seats on the lesser of the two, they’re available as an option.

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro Chassis

  • Optimized cornering ABS & traction control
  • Showa adjustable off-road suspension
  • Triumph Shift Assist quickshifter (Pro model)
  • Adjustable seat height
  • white frame inspired by the “Tiger Tramontana” rallybike
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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A tubular-steel Trellis on the Tiger 900 Rally provides the main structure with a bolt-up subframe section that can be struck for maintenance and repairs, and a yoke-style aluminum swingarm to finish up the skeleton. Laced wheels have always been the go-to wheels for off-road riders, so it’s no surprise to see them on this adventuresome duo.

In keeping with its terrain-busting mission, the Rally and Rally Pro lead off with a 21-inch tubeless rim and follow up with a 17-inch rim for the handling characteristics they add to the mix. Pirelli Scorpion Rally hoops make the connection to the ground with a tread that’s proven effective on loose surfaces in a 90/90 and 150/70 on the front and rear, respectively.

A six-axis inertial-measurement unit reads the forces acting on the bike and feeds the data to the multi-mode ABS to deliver corner-optimized anti-lock protection on both models.

The steering head sets a rake angle of 24.4 degrees with 5.74 inches of trail to make the Rally siblings eager enough in the corners while maintaining a measure of straight-line stability for comfortable cruising.

A set of 45 mm Showa forks float the front end on the full trinity of adjustments, and out back, Showa adds adjustable preload and rebound damping. Lest you have any doubts about the Rally’s off-road chops, the 9.44-inch front travel and 9.05-inch rear travel should affirm the pedigree ’cause those are some seriously long strokes that land near the very top of the scale. As for the brake hardware, the heavy work falls to the four-pot, Brembo Stylema Monobloc anchors and dual 320 mm front discs with a single-piston Brembo caliper and 255 mm disc out back.

Frame: Tubular steel frame, bolt-on subframe
Swingarm: Twin-sided, cast aluminum alloy
Front Suspension/ Travel: Showa 45 mm upside down forks, manual preload, rebound damping and compression damping adjustment/ 9.44 in (240 mm)
Rear Suspension/ Travel: Showa rear suspension unit, manual preload and rebound damping adjustment/ 9.05 in (230 mm)
Rake: 24.4º
Trail: 5.74 in (145.8 mm)
Front Brakes: Twin 320 mm floating discs, Brembo Stylema 4-piston Monobloc calipers. Radial front master cylinder, Multi-mode ABS, Optimized Cornering ABS.
Rear Brakes: Single 255 mm disc. Brembo single-piston sliding caliper, Multi-mode ABS, Optimized cornering ABS
Front Wheel: Spoked Tubeless, 21 x 2.15 in
Rear Wheel: Spoked Tubeless, 17 x 4.25 in
Front Tire: 90/90-21
Rear Tire: 150/70R17

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro Drivetrain

  • New high-performance 900 cc engine
  • 93.9 hp @ 8,750 rpm
  • 64 lb-ft @ 7,250 rpm
  • 10% more torque than the Tiger 800
  • 9% more power in the mid-range
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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Triumph powers its newest Tigers with a liquid-cooled triple that produces 93.9 horsepower at 8,750 rpm with 64 pound-feet of torque that fully develops at 7,250 rpm, so this engine definitely likes to be wound up to deliver the goods.

That's 10-percent more grunt than the previous generation, and is sure to make the Rally siblings eager when riding in difficult terrain and pulling steep grades.

The factory tinkered with the firing order and decided that the 1-3-2 progression delivered the best performance and produced the earliest usable grunt. It gives the mill a fat torque curve that pulls fairly low down in the range in spite of its 7k-plus max-torque rpm. In addition to a unique exhaust note, the under-load intake noise was reduced over the previous gen to give the mill a distinctive sound signature overall.

A 78 mm bore and 61.9 mm stroke gives it an over-square layout and an 888 cc displacement with a medium-hot 11.27-to-1 compression ratio that demands top-octane pump champagne. Stainless-steel is the material of choice for the 3-into-1 exhaust system for the inherent longevity it brings to the table.

The Rally comes with a quartet of rider modes, but the Pro adds two more to the mix for a total of six distinct power-delivery personalities, and as with the ABS, the IMU data enables corner-optimized traction control to give the pair lean-sensitive protection coming and going for top-shelf protection.

Power flows through a six-speed transmixxer before it heads to the rear wheel via an O-ring chain final drive. The Rally Pro caps off the drivetrain with a Shift Assist feature that’ll let you work both up and down the range without ever touching the clutch or even rolling off the throttle to deliver blistering acceleration and smooth, controlled downshifts.

All told, the overall drive ratio pushes the Rally and Rally Pro up to 125 mph, and if you live in an area that uses the tiered licensing system, the Rally can be had with A2-compliant power modulation.

Engine: Liquid-cooled, 12-valve, DOHC, inline 3-cylinder
Displacement: 888 cc
Bore x Stroke: 78 mm x 61.9 mm
Compression: 11.27:1
Max Power EC: 93.9 hp (70 kW) @ 8,750 rpm
Max Torque EC: 64 lb-ft @ 7,250 rpm
System: Multi-point sequential electronic fuel injection
Exhaust: Stainless steel 3-into-1 header system, side mounted stainless steel silencer
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate
Gearbox: 6-speed

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro Pricing

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
- image 880234
2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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The official word has the Rally bros' prices as still TBA, but unofficially, word on the street has a $15,000 sticker on the base Tiger 900 Rally.

If I had to guess, I’d say the Rally Pro is going to add at least $1,500 to that total. If nothing else, we’ll have harder figures on that by the April release date.

Instrument Display and Functions: 7" TFT multi­functional instrument pack with digital speedometer, trip computer, digital tachometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, service indicator, ambient temperature, clock and Riding Modes.
Color: Pure White, Sapphire Black, Matte Khaki Green
Price: TBD

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro Competitors

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro
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2018 - 2019 BMW F 750 GS / F 850 GS
- image 749319

Usually I feel compelled to go straight to Ducati for a worthy competitor for the Tiger, but this time, BMW was my Huckleberry with its adventuresome 2020 F 850 GS.

BMW F 850 GS

2018 - 2019 BMW F 750 GS / F 850 GS
- image 749307

Beemer hits the bricks with a fairly standard ADV-bike look that shares many features with the Tiger such as a fancy front fender, bird’s beak fairing, and vented windshield though the glass is a tad shorter on the BMW and will punch a smaller hole in the weather, for sure.

The F 850 GS cedes the cold-weather comfort edge to Trumpet with a lack of stock heated grips – kinda’ crazy considering Germany’s climate if you think about it. Traction control and a switchable ABS feature increases safety, but it looks like the stock Beemer falls flat in the infotainment department compared to the niceties the Tiger brings to the table. Oh well, you had to know that the price difference was indicative of some compromises on Beemer’s end.

What kind of difference are we looking at? Well, the Tiger 900 fetches $15 grand while the base F 850 GS rolls for $13,345, but fret not dear rider, if you can’t live without music, maps, and messaging, you can pony up some extra cheddar and get the F 850 GS on par with the Tiger. One thing I don’t see anywhere is a lean-sensitive component on the Bavarian, and that leaves the Tiger looking pretty good from a safety standpoint. BMW powers its ride with a 90-horsepower parallel-twin plant that again leaves the Tiger with another slight advantage with its 93.9 ponies.

By the time you add the available optional equipment to make the BMW as close to a match as possible to the Tiger, the price advantage shifts back to the Triumph, and it still carries more fandanglery to make Triumph the clear winner of the two.

Read our full review of the BMW F 750 GS / F 850 GS.

He Said

“Triumph’s next-gen, mid-size adventure bike looks like a winner all around. The base-model Rally is sweet enough, but the Rally Pro steps it up a notch to deliver a top-shelf riding experience. If I had to try and find something to pick on it would be the rubber; I can’t imagine the Scorpions performing better off-road than a proper set of stealth knobbies, but if you plan on doing a little globetrotting, that is easy enough to rectify.”

She Said

My wife and fellow motorcycle writer, Allyn Hinton, says, “This is a completely new bike, not just a rebrushed 800. The Rally is, quite apparently the off-road-oriented version of the new Tiger 900 family. The new crank and new firing order gives the engine a more V-twin feel so you have more torque lower down in the range; but because it is a triple, you still have it in the mid-range, as well. The TFT display is huge by all current standards and it has some new features that make it more readable with less reflection and it has new graphics for better visibility. The bike has more horsepower and more torque than the 800s. It has a narrow waist and handling is agile with tracking stability and it has a really nice infotainment system. Altogether, this looks like a capable adventure tourer.”

2020 Triumph Tiger 900 Rally / Rally Pro Specifications

Engine & Drivetrain:
Engine: Liquid-cooled, 12-valve, DOHC, inline 3-cylinder
Displacement: 888 cc
Bore x Stroke: 78 mm x 61.9 mm
Compression: 11.27:1
Max Power EC: 93.9 hp (70 kW) @ 8,750 rpm
Max Torque EC: 64 lb-ft @ 7,250 rpm
System: Multi-point sequential electronic fuel injection
Exhaust: Stainless steel 3-into-1 header system, side mounted stainless steel silencer
Final Drive: O-ring chain
Clutch: Wet, multi-plate
Gearbox: 6-speed
Chassis:
Frame: Tubular steel frame, bolt-on subframe
Swingarm: Twin-sided, cast aluminum alloy
Front Suspension/ Travel: Showa 45 mm upside down forks, manual preload, rebound damping and compression damping adjustment/ 9.44 in (240 mm)
Rear Suspension/ Travel: Showa rear suspension unit, manual preload and rebound damping adjustment/ 9.05 in (230 mm)
Rake: 24.4º
Trail: 5.74 in (145.8 mm)
Front Brakes: Twin 320 mm floating discs, Brembo Stylema 4-piston Monobloc calipers. Radial front master cylinder, Multi-mode ABS, Optimized Cornering ABS.
Rear Brakes: Single 255 mm disc. Brembo single-piston sliding caliper, Multi-mode ABS, Optimized cornering ABS
Front Wheel: Spoked Tubeless, 21 x 2.15 in
Rear Wheel: Spoked Tubeless, 17 x 4.25 in
Front Tire: 90/90-21
Rear Tire: 150/70R17
Dimensions & Capacities:
Width Handlebars: 36.81 in (935 mm)
Height Without Mirror: 57.16 in - 59.13 in (1,452 mm - 1,502 mm)
Seat Height: 33.46 in - 34.25 in (850 mm - 870 mm)
Wheelbase: 61.06 in (1,551 mm)
Dry Weight: 432 Lbs (196 kg), Pro: 443 lbs (201 kg)
Tank Capacity: 5.28 gal (20 L)
Fuel economy: 55.4 mpg (5.2l/100 km)
Top Speed: 125 mph
Details:
Instrument Display and Functions: 7" TFT multi­functional instrument pack with digital speedometer, trip computer, digital tachometer, gear position indicator, fuel gauge, service indicator, ambient temperature, clock and Riding Modes.
Color: Pure White, Sapphire Black, Matte Khaki Green
Price: TBD

Further Reading

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TJ Hinton
T.J got an early start from his father and other family members who owned and rode motorcycles, and by helping with various mechanical repairs throughout childhood. That planted a seed that grew into a well-rounded appreciation of all things mechanical, and eventually, into a formal education of same. Though primarily a Harley rider, he has an appreciation for all sorts of bikes and doesn't discriminate against any particular brand or region of origin. He currently holds an Associate's degree in applied mechanical science from his time at the M.M.I.  Read More
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All images featured on this website are copyrighted to their respective rightful owners. No infringement is intended. Image Source: triumphmotorcycles.com, bmwmotorcycles.com

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