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Triumph's 1200cc Scrambler confirmed with this video

Triumph’s 1200cc Scrambler confirmed with this video

Bigger engine, brakes, suspension and expectations

Rumors of a 1200cc Scrambler from the Hinckley chaps were floating the web for some time now. Triumph has finally confirmed this gossip when they released a teaser video of the “The all-new Scrambler 1200”. This is Triumph’s efforts to prove that they still can rule the popular scrambler category.

The 1200 Scrambler boasts of the new high torque engine used on the Brit’s Bonneville lineup, and to handle all that additional power, this Scrambler gets equipped with bigger wheels, bigger brakes, and bigger suspension.

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2016 - 2018 Benelli Leoncino Trail

2016 - 2018 Benelli Leoncino Trail

Here to ride dusty back roads as well as rough terrain

Ever since Benelli started showcasing us products designed by CentroStile Benelli, their reputation seems to have gotten back to its original charm albeit owned by a Chinese firm. The same design house has once again wowed us by showcasing the Leoncino (pronounced Leon-cheeno), meaning the Lion Cub street and the Leoncino Trail, the scrambler-esque edition.

These motorcycles were first showcased at the 2015 EICMA as a concept, and the very next year, the production model came out for the European and a few Asian markets, and it had maintained the rugged and beautiful lines. We are here for the "all-terrain" version of the two-cylinder Casa di Pesaro.

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2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

Maybe a Flat Tracker, Maybe A Scrambler? Not Really Either

Ducati’s popular Scrambler line saw its footprint expand significantly with the addition of a handful of new models that includes the flat track-tastic Full Throttle. There’s no denying that scrambler-style bikes are enjoying an uptick right along with flat track-style racing, so it makes perfect sense for Duc to bring these two worlds together in a bid to grab its slice of the market pie. Model-specific details are the garnish on the main dish that is the base Scrambler, and of course, the 75-horsepower, Desmodromic L-twin powerplant takes care of business for the “FT,” same as it does for the rest of the line. LED, USB and ABS tech factors into the fandanglery to make this a thoroughly modern ride, so without further ado, let’s dig in and see how Duc sets this ride apart from its brethren.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler Hashtag

2018 Ducati Scrambler Hashtag

The only production model to be sold online

If you think that Ducati made the Scramblers for entertaining the youth, you are absolutely right. But if you believe the Italians cannot entice them more than this, oh boy you are so wrong. Ducati has finally bowed down to the millennials who love doing everything through a screen. Planned out by the millennial interns at the Ducati offices, the firm has launched the most affordable Scrambler model adding to the already strong line-up of six models.

And it’s aptly called the Scrambler Hashtag. Yes, the #. What is even more brain tickling is the fact that Ducati is going to sell these bikes exclusively through a screen rather than on a showroom floor. But it isn’t as straightforward as your Amazon deliveries are and is currently made available only to the European streets.

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2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Rough

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Rough

Almost There; Kinda ’Scrambler-Like’

Moto Guzzi expands its V7 III footprint off the black and onto the brown with the new-for-2018 “Rough” variant. As its cleverly-ingenious name implies, this model comes set up to have some definite scramble-tastic tendencies with street-knobbies that perform as well on soft terrain as they do on the pavement. Like the rest of the family, power comes from a 744 cc V-twin that delivers 44 pound-feet of torque for solid holeshots and plenty of hill-conquering grunt. There’s plenty of that characteristic MG style to go around as well, courtesy of the sideways engine mount and fuel tank design. Best of all, the Rough beefs up its entry-level bike claim with ABS and traction control that can be turned off for a raw ride, or enabled for maximum stability. MG snuck some other yummy bits in there, so let’s just go ahead and dig right in.

Continue reading for my review of the Moto Guzzi V7 III Rough.

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2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Icon

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Icon

A Snappy Commuter Or Your Weekend Fun Bike

The Ducati Scrambler family has been rapidly expanding since its inception — in both the displacement ranges and available styles — but the stalwart Icon remains largely the same into the 2018 model year. It brings the same street-wise spice to the table as ever, and it comes paired with the 803 cc L-twin that delivers its 75 ponies in an easy-to-manage powercurve. Ducati also expanded its palette a bit with the addition of the “Silver Ice” hue. Little else is changed for the ’18 season, but why in the world would Ducati change something that seems to be working so well and is of such a recent vintage? If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, right?

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Icon.

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2015 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Classic

2015 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Classic

Hooliganism And Devil-May-Care Attitude Is Standard Equipped

Ducati’s Scrambler lineup covers a range of looks and styles, but it’s the Classic that really ties into the original Scrambler circa the 1970s. It comes with Sugar White as one of the available colors — just like the original — and sports a tan finish on the seat for even more dated flavor. Performance is up to modern standards however; with 75 ponies in the paddock and Euro 4 emissions compliance, the Classic delivers contemporary operation to go with its somewhat dated aesthetic influences. The hooliganism and devil-may-care attitude comes as part of the standard equipment package.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Classis.

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2016 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

2016 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

Who Doesn’t Have Fun On A Scrambler?

The scrambler market is booming, and so far, Ducati is ahead of the curve with a full range of purpose-built Scrambler models. It added to the lineup in 2016 with its Scrambler Sixty2, a model that reflects what the factory calls modern pop culture, with a liberal dose of sixties, mid-size standard cruiser flavor blended in. Powered with a 399 cc L-twin, the Sixty2 isn’t a poser in a scrambler costume; it’s ready to rock and roll.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler Street Classic

2018 Ducati Scrambler Street Classic

Put A Monster Engine In A Scrambler And What Do You Get?

After its overseas debut last year in Abu Dhabi, Dubai and elsewhere, Ducati is bringing the Scrambler Street Classic to the U.S. market for the 2018 model year. The Street Classic borrows from the ’70s custom scene for its unique spin on the scrambler platform and an 803 cc L-twin that delivers 73 horsepower to maintain the same level of performance as the rest of the mid-size Scrambler family. ABS provides the only electronic safety equipment, but if you’re looking for techno-gadgetry, then you’re definitely looking at the wrong type of bike, no matter the manufacturer. Ducati continues to morph its Scrambler lineup in an attempt to get as much mileage as possible out of it, and who can blame them. The range has proven itself to be very popular with the masses and a blank canvas for personalization. Are they jumping the shark yet? Let’s find out.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Street Classic.

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2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled

The Differences, However Minor, Make All The Difference

Ducati’s Scrambler line grew yet again in the 2017 model year with the addition of the Café Racer and Desert Sled. The Scrambler range has proven to be a veritable mine of possibilities as Ducati capable model in the entire range, and the Café Racer, well, it comes set up to look cool in an urban environment. Both rides get the same 803 cc mill that powers the rest of the Scrambler variants along with much the same chassis, but the differences, however minor, make all the difference in the world.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled.

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2016 - 2017 Triumph Scrambler

2016 - 2017 Triumph Scrambler

Harkens Right Back To The Scrambler Heyday Of The ’60s

The scrambler market is enjoying something of a boom with everybody and his uncle jumping on the bandwagon in recent years. Unlike many of these Johnny-come-lately manufacturers, Triumph had been quietly producing their modern version of the classic scrambler concept, in the form of the aptly named Triumph Scrambler, since 2006 and continued up until 2017 when air cooling gave way to liquid. This favorite day-tripper by rough-and-tumble folks like Steve McQueen runs a fuel-injected engine in typical Triumph fashion with 865 cc parallel twin.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Scrambler.

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2018 Husqvarna Svartpilen 401

2018 Husqvarna Svartpilen 401

Husky Gives Us A Saucy Little Scrambler

Husqvarna Motorcycles, long known for its off-road prowess, takes the plunge into the sort-of streetbike market with its new Svartpilen 410. Set up like an urban scrambler, Husky bills the Svartpilen as an entry-level commuter/explorer with an easy-to-ride and fun nature. A 375 cc thumper drives the “Black Arrow” with 43 horsepower waiting to be unleashed under the control of a ride-by-wire throttle and slipper clutch that couples engine power to the six-speed gearbox. Suspension and rolling gear reflect a certain amount of off-road capability, useful for crossing medians and cruising down the beach (check local laws first) or other soft surfaces, the Svartpilen has a certain amount of ’everybike’ in its DNA.

Continue reading for my review of the Husqvarna Svartpilen 401.

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2017 - 2018 Triumph Street Scrambler

2017 - 2018 Triumph Street Scrambler

More Street Twin Than Scrambler, But Still Fun

Triumph has been getting some mileage out of its new 900 cc engine, and this mill drives yet another mid-size ride for the “Street Twin” family: the Street Scrambler. As the name implies, this bike is built mainly for urban use but comes with an off-road capability one simply does not get from a straight-up streetbike. The Street Scrambler brings rider-friendly performance and stable handling to the table, but in a market glutted with scrambler models from all over the globe, one has to wonder if that is enough to stay competitive. Let’s delve into this Triumph and find out.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Street Scrambler.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport

2018 Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport

A Scrambler Even The Fiery-Eyed Pegdraggers Can Love

Ducati really made a splash when it reintroduced its Scrambler line back in 2014. The 800 cc model begat the 400 cc model, but the factory didn’t stop there, it also reached up into the higher displacements as well with the Scrambler 1100 series. For 2018, we have the Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport that elevates the family line to a whole new level with some top-shelf suspension components and race-tastic livery meant to appeal primarily to the go-fast crowd. Much is shared with its big-bore siblings; chassis, engine and electronics, but the Sport endeavors to increase the line’s inclusivity by drawing in those fiery-eyed pegdraggers. Is it a bridge too far? That’s doubtful, because as far as I can tell, the factory has yet to hit any natural barriers to the potential of the new Scrambler line.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler 1100

2018 Ducati Scrambler 1100

Getting Better With Each Incarnation

There can be little doubt that Ducati’s Scrambler line has been a success thus far, and after expanding the mid-displacement (803 cc) family downward last year with the 399 cc Sixty2, the factory decided to go the other direction with its Scrambler 1100 range. Larger, more powerful and arguably more mature, the 1100s bring to the table the same sassy style as their smaller siblings along with 86 grin-inducing ponies and an electronics suite (riding modes, TC, ABS) commensurate with its greater capabilities. In short, the Scrambler line is all growed up now and ready to swim in the deep end; or is it. Let’s investigate this new branch on the Scrambler family tree and judge for ourselves.

Continue reading for my look at the Ducati Scrambler 1100 and Scrambler 100 Special.

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2017 Yamaha SCR950

2017 Yamaha SCR950

An Authentic Scrambler In The Purist Sense

The retro war heats up as more manufacturers jump into the fray, and Yamaha finally took the plunge with its new-in-2017 SCR950 scrambler. Based on the Star Bolt, this bike runs the same proven 942 cc mill with a decidedly classic overall flavor dating back to the original scramblers of the ’60s and ’70s. I must confess that I have an affinity for scramblers, and I already know the Bolt is a heck of a bike, even if it is, shall we say, very ’flattering’ to a certain Sportster currently on the market, so it is with high expectations that I approach The Tuning Fork Company’s new foray into scrambler territory.

Continue reading for my review of the Yamaha SCR950.

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2018 First Look: Indian Motorcycle Scout FTR1200

2018 First Look: Indian Motorcycle Scout FTR1200

Concept Flat-Tracker For The Street

Unless you’ve been living under a rock or are in denial about your team getting completely owned by Indian Motorcycle’s flat-track racing team, the Wrecking Crew, chances are you’re aware of the recent leap from obscurity to the pinnacle of FT racing prowess under the Polaris umbrella. In honor of this recent success, and in an effort to ride the current wave of popularity and interest in this storied American brand, Indian has put together a street-legal ride fit for the masses; the Scout FTR1200 Custom. As the cleverly-ingenious name suggests, it’s based on the Scout platform, but any resemblance to the actual Scout seems to be solely in name and the general engine layout. In fact, let’s just shine on the whole Scout thing for the moment, and focus on what this bike actually is, shall we?

Continue reading for my look at the Indian Motorcycle Scout FTR1200 Custom.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler Mach 2.0

2018 Ducati Scrambler Mach 2.0

Ducati’s Newest Addition To The Scrambler Stable

Ducati made some adjustments to its Scrambler lineup this year. The “Mach 2.0” moves in to help fill the void left by the departure of the Flat Track Pro and Urban Enduro but creates a niche of its own with a particularly nostalgia-inducing look meant to call to mind the 70s on the West Coast. Roland Sands Design in Los Angeles, California, drew on its vast experience as a custom bike builder on that very coast to dream up this variant on the Scrambler theme at Ducati’s request, and the result is ’pretty cool, man.’ The differences between the Scramblers can be subtle, though noticeable; but today I’m going to take a look at the Mach 2.0 and see what RSD switched up to set this ride apart from the rest of the range.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Mach 2.0.

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2017 - 2018 Suzuki VanVan 200

2017 - 2018 Suzuki VanVan 200

First out in the 1970s, the VanVan from Suzuki has that charming retro look that screams UJM. Recently reintroduced here in the U.S., the VanVan gets a 200 cc engine, an upgrade from the old 125 cc model that is still available in other markets. In typical scrambler fashion, the VanVan 200 is the dirt-road/gravel-road/loose-dirt ride that qualifies it as a “sandbike” because of the fat rear tire that keeps you going. Better than an ATV in some situations, the Vanvan is lightweight and capable, perfect for a jaunt around the ranch, a quick run up the trapline or an excursion down the beach — anywhere the ground is loose and four wheels just won’t do.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Vanvan 200.

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2017 BMW R NineT Urban G/S

2017 BMW R NineT Urban G/S

A sophisticated nostalgia kicking some dust.

Success was not a problem with BMW, especially for their R NineT. It has absolutely been a hit story for the German ever since it launched the R Nine T in 2013. It was so good that BMW struggled initially to keep up with the demand and they released one version after the other in succession to the world stage that includes the Pure (roadster) and Racer (café/endurance-style), as well as the Scrambler. It is a no brainer that BMW Motorrad will see it fitting to extend their range even further.

The GS motorcycles refer to either Gelände/Straße (German: off-road/road) and are distinguished by their long travel suspension, upright riding position and larger front wheels. Taking up the same moniker is the Urban G/S which is a purpose built street-oriented motorcycle that has a charm bound to resonate with onlookers. Based on the ‘Lac Rose’ concept seen at Wheels and Waves earlier last year, the German finally took the wraps off their new 2017 BMW R nineT Urban G/S at the previous EICMA in Milan.

Paying homage to the original 1980 BMW R80G/S, this urban combines the classic motorcycle with modern technology and sophisticated craftsmanship that can transport anyone back to the days when the GS abbreviation meant a sense of freedom and the passion for adventure on two wheels, both on-road and off-road. But this time they’re for looks and not for bashing your way across unpaved expanses of Africa.

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2016 Moto Guzzi V7 II

2016 Moto Guzzi V7 II

Back in 1977, Moto Guzzi struck upon a winning formula with the V750 cruiser/tour bike. The original V7 was a hit with riders, and the evolution of that line leads us through the ’08 V7 Classic up to the current V7 II lineup. This lineup includes three sub-models: the 2016 V7 II Stone meant to succeed the V7 Classic, the Special “Scrambler” built to resemble the old-school scramblers from back in the ’70s and the Racer “America” that captures the essence of the cafe’ racer culture from the same era.

Since these markets are once again booming, as if it were their turn again on some great, cosmic wheel of recurring fashions, this line from MG seems to be right on time.

Continue reading for my review of the Moto Guzzi V7 II Stone, V7 II Racer and V7 II Scrambler.

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2016 Ducati Scrambler

2016 Ducati Scrambler

The 2015 model year saw four new Ducati products built for a rather niche market; the Scrambler family that includes the ’70s-themed Classic, the flat-track race inspired Urban Enduro, the Full Throttle which combines an amped-up, flat-track race look with an urban hooligan touch and the Icon, a basic, modernized version of a traditional scrambler that serves as a blank canvas for riders looking to make a statement.

Ducati treated us to another branch on the Scrambler family tree in 2016 with the Flat Track Pro, another oval-dirt tribute bike that takes the racing references to the Nth degree. So far, it seems the Scrambler family is popular with a younger demographic, and I have even heard old-school styled Scramblers referred to as Hipster bikes. It figures, considering the dual-purpose nature of the family that provides decent road performance and maintains the ability to access, shall we say, alternative routes? Today I want to take a look at these five models, and check out the various subtleties and nuances that make each one unique.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scramblers.

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2015 Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro

2015 Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro

The Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro is a modern motorcycle that deals great with the requirements of city riding, but also feels pretty comfortable on the open road.

As far as style is concerned, the Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro features a classy brown seat with a ribbed design, lined with technical fabrics, a big, round headlight protected by an old school grill and aluminum 10 spoke wheels that measure 3’’ x 18’’ up front and 5.5” x 17” at the rear.

The motorcycle is also equipped with a high mudguard made of plastic fibre, LED lights, an LCD dashboard and an off road handlebar with cross bar.

The Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro is propelled by an 803 cc, L-twin, Desmodromic distribution, 2 valves per cylinder, air cooled engine which generates a maximum output of 55 KW (75 Hp) at 8,250 rpm and 68 Nm (50 Lb-Ft) of torque at 5,750 Rpm.

Hit the jump for more information on the Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro.

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