view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC

2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC

Not Just A Name, It’s An Actual Scrambler

Triumph Motorcycles bills its new Scrambler 1200 XC as an “all-road” machine that’s got what it takes to tackle everything you throw at it. Not quite as off-road-tastic as its sibling, the 1200 XE, it nevertheless delivers top-shelf performance by anyone’s standards. Adjustable, long-stroke suspension components join a “scrambler-tuned” engine and wire wheels for the brown-top work, and for the blacktop, there’s a whole slew of electronic safety goodies that give the “XC” its split-personality. Bonneville power and classic looks come together in the XC, so today I want to dive into the details of this Gemini ride.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Scrambler 1200 XC.

Read more
2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE

2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE

Tough Enough For The Baja 1000 Endurance Race

Triumph brings classic scrambler looks and modern performance together with its new-for-MY2019 Scrambler 1200 XE. The “XE” carries itself with plenty of the old-school standard DNA on display and an off-road bias that leaves no doubt as to how it’s meant to be used. Proper “any-road” hoops deliver the goods on just about any surface, but it’s the top-shelf safety electronics that really sell this Bonneville-powered ride. Triumph promises a machine with a true dual-identity, so today I want to test that claim and see how it stacks up against one or two prominent competitors.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Scrambler 1200 XE.

Read more
2019 Triumph Street Scrambler

2019 Triumph Street Scrambler

Significant Upgrades Including More Power & More Torque

Triumph’s Street Scrambler made a splash when it hit the market a couple of years ago, and the factory rolls out a fresh, new generation for the 2019 model year. That’s right; the “SS” brings more yummy-goodness to the table with an updated look to go with a whole passel of improved electronic features that turn this classic into a thoroughly modern ride. It isn’t all about the visuals and hang-on gear either, the powerplant generates 18% more fun (or power, if you insist) for your riding enjoyment. Really, it would almost be easier to tell you what isn’t new, but that’s not why they feed me, so let’s dig into this new Trumpet and see if we can find a suitable competitor for it.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Street Scrambler.

Read more
2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon

2019 Ducati Scrambler Icon

Modern equipment, revised riding ergonomics, new paint schemes and better safety tech

2014 was the year Ducati started rolling their Scrambler editions, and after almost half a decade, Scrambler is no longer just a model, but now it is a brand. Till today, Ducati has been making Scramblers which could have been abused, but it pleased the urban way and masses, and hence they became glorified street bikes.

And the most successful model is receiving a much-needed update for the year 2019 ‘Scrambler Joyvolution’. The Ducati Scrambler Icon – will now come with modern equipment, revised riding ergonomics, new paint schemes, and better safety tech to keep both wheels planted in all situations.

Read more
Triumph's 1200cc Scrambler confirmed with this video

Triumph’s 1200cc Scrambler confirmed with this video

Bigger engine, brakes, suspension and expectations

Rumors of a 1200cc Scrambler from the Hinckley chaps were floating the web for some time now. Triumph has finally confirmed this gossip when they released a teaser video of the “The all-new Scrambler 1200”. This is Triumph’s efforts to prove that they still can rule the popular scrambler category.

The 1200 Scrambler boasts of the new high torque engine used on the Brit’s Bonneville lineup, and to handle all that additional power, this Scrambler gets equipped with bigger wheels, bigger brakes, and bigger suspension.

Read more
2016 - 2018 Benelli Leoncino Trail

2016 - 2018 Benelli Leoncino Trail

Here to ride dusty back roads as well as rough terrain

Ever since Benelli started showcasing us products designed by CentroStile Benelli, their reputation seems to have gotten back to its original charm albeit owned by a Chinese firm. The same design house has once again wowed us by showcasing the Leoncino (pronounced Leon-cheeno), meaning the Lion Cub street and the Leoncino Trail, the scrambler-esque edition.

These motorcycles were first showcased at the 2015 EICMA as a concept, and the very next year, the production model came out for the European and a few Asian markets, and it had maintained the rugged and beautiful lines. We are here for the "all-terrain" version of the two-cylinder Casa di Pesaro.

Read more
2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle

Maybe a Flat Tracker, Maybe A Scrambler? Not Really Either

Ducati’s popular Scrambler line saw its footprint expand significantly with the addition of a handful of new models that includes the flat track-tastic Full Throttle. There’s no denying that scrambler-style bikes are enjoying an uptick right along with flat track-style racing, so it makes perfect sense for Duc to bring these two worlds together in a bid to grab its slice of the market pie. Model-specific details are the garnish on the main dish that is the base Scrambler, and of course, the 75-horsepower, Desmodromic L-twin powerplant takes care of business for the “FT,” same as it does for the rest of the line. LED, USB and ABS tech factors into the fandanglery to make this a thoroughly modern ride, so without further ado, let’s dig in and see how Duc sets this ride apart from its brethren.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Full Throttle.

Read more
2018 Ducati Scrambler Hashtag

2018 Ducati Scrambler Hashtag

The only production model to be sold online

If you think that Ducati made the Scramblers for entertaining the youth, you are absolutely right. But if you believe the Italians cannot entice them more than this, oh boy you are so wrong. Ducati has finally bowed down to the millennials who love doing everything through a screen. Planned out by the millennial interns at the Ducati offices, the firm has launched the most affordable Scrambler model adding to the already strong line-up of six models.

And it’s aptly called the Scrambler Hashtag. Yes, the #. What is even more brain tickling is the fact that Ducati is going to sell these bikes exclusively through a screen rather than on a showroom floor. But it isn’t as straightforward as your Amazon deliveries are and is currently made available only to the European streets.

Read more
2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Rough

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Rough

Almost There; Kinda ’Scrambler-Like’

Moto Guzzi expands its V7 III footprint off the black and onto the brown with the new-for-2018 “Rough” variant. As its cleverly-ingenious name implies, this model comes set up to have some definite scramble-tastic tendencies with street-knobbies that perform as well on soft terrain as they do on the pavement. Like the rest of the family, power comes from a 744 cc V-twin that delivers 44 pound-feet of torque for solid holeshots and plenty of hill-conquering grunt. There’s plenty of that characteristic MG style to go around as well, courtesy of the sideways engine mount and fuel tank design. Best of all, the Rough beefs up its entry-level bike claim with ABS and traction control that can be turned off for a raw ride, or enabled for maximum stability. MG snuck some other yummy bits in there, so let’s just go ahead and dig right in.

Continue reading for my review of the Moto Guzzi V7 III Rough.

Read more
2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Icon

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Icon

A Snappy Commuter Or Your Weekend Fun Bike

The Ducati Scrambler family has been rapidly expanding since its inception — in both the displacement ranges and available styles — but the stalwart Icon remains largely the same into the 2018 model year. It brings the same street-wise spice to the table as ever, and it comes paired with the 803 cc L-twin that delivers its 75 ponies in an easy-to-manage powercurve. Ducati also expanded its palette a bit with the addition of the “Silver Ice” hue. Little else is changed for the ’18 season, but why in the world would Ducati change something that seems to be working so well and is of such a recent vintage? If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, right?

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Icon.

Read more
2015 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Classic

2015 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Classic

Hooliganism And Devil-May-Care Attitude Is Standard Equipped

Ducati’s Scrambler lineup covers a range of looks and styles, but it’s the Classic that really ties into the original Scrambler circa the 1970s. It comes with Sugar White as one of the available colors — just like the original — and sports a tan finish on the seat for even more dated flavor. Performance is up to modern standards however; with 75 ponies in the paddock and Euro 4 emissions compliance, the Classic delivers contemporary operation to go with its somewhat dated aesthetic influences. The hooliganism and devil-may-care attitude comes as part of the standard equipment package.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Classis.

Read more
2016 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

2016 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Sixty2

Who Doesn’t Have Fun On A Scrambler?

The scrambler market is booming, and so far, Ducati is ahead of the curve with a full range of purpose-built Scrambler models. It added to the lineup in 2016 with its Scrambler Sixty2, a model that reflects what the factory calls modern pop culture, with a liberal dose of sixties, mid-size standard cruiser flavor blended in. Powered with a 399 cc L-twin, the Sixty2 isn’t a poser in a scrambler costume; it’s ready to rock and roll.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Sixty2.

Read more
2018 Ducati Scrambler Street Classic

2018 Ducati Scrambler Street Classic

Put A Monster Engine In A Scrambler And What Do You Get?

After its overseas debut last year in Abu Dhabi, Dubai and elsewhere, Ducati is bringing the Scrambler Street Classic to the U.S. market for the 2018 model year. The Street Classic borrows from the ’70s custom scene for its unique spin on the scrambler platform and an 803 cc L-twin that delivers 73 horsepower to maintain the same level of performance as the rest of the mid-size Scrambler family. ABS provides the only electronic safety equipment, but if you’re looking for techno-gadgetry, then you’re definitely looking at the wrong type of bike, no matter the manufacturer. Ducati continues to morph its Scrambler lineup in an attempt to get as much mileage as possible out of it, and who can blame them. The range has proven itself to be very popular with the masses and a blank canvas for personalization. Are they jumping the shark yet? Let’s find out.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Street Classic.

Read more
2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled

The Differences, However Minor, Make All The Difference

Ducati’s Scrambler line grew yet again in the 2017 model year with the addition of the Café Racer and Desert Sled. The Scrambler range has proven to be a veritable mine of possibilities as Ducati capable model in the entire range, and the Café Racer, well, it comes set up to look cool in an urban environment. Both rides get the same 803 cc mill that powers the rest of the Scrambler variants along with much the same chassis, but the differences, however minor, make all the difference in the world.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled.

Read more
2016 - 2017 Triumph Scrambler

2016 - 2017 Triumph Scrambler

Harkens Right Back To The Scrambler Heyday Of The ’60s

The scrambler market is enjoying something of a boom with everybody and his uncle jumping on the bandwagon in recent years. Unlike many of these Johnny-come-lately manufacturers, Triumph had been quietly producing their modern version of the classic scrambler concept, in the form of the aptly named Triumph Scrambler, since 2006 and continued up until 2017 when air cooling gave way to liquid. This favorite day-tripper by rough-and-tumble folks like Steve McQueen runs a fuel-injected engine in typical Triumph fashion with 865 cc parallel twin.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Scrambler.

Read more