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2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone

Eclectic And Essential, Says The Factory

Moto Guzzi’s V7 family expands yet again with the V7 III series that sees the popular “Stone” model carry over from the outgoing V7 II generation. The new Stone carries itself with the same subtle darkness that made its predecessor so popular along with many of the genetic markers normally associated with the Moto Guzzi brand. Foremost among these is the transverse-mount V-twin powerplant that protrudes conspicuously from both sides of the bike, and of course, the 52 ponies that come along with it. The fuel tank strikes a classic shape as well, and the rest of the design falls right into line with plenty of yummy-goodness under the hood in the ABS and traction control features. There’s more to be found, so let’s dig into this little Italian gem with its not-so-polished moniker.

See our review of the Moto Guzzi V7 III Stone.

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2017 - 2018 KTM 125 Duke

2017 - 2018 KTM 125 Duke

Small-Displacement Ride With A Big-Bike Attitude

The battle of the flyweights rages on as KTM stays in the fray with its race-tastic 125 Duke. KTM takes much the same tack as the competition and builds its entry-level ride to resemble the machines it has to offer further up the licensing chain. The angular Duke bodywork and exposed Trellis frame set the stage for the key player, the 11 kW powerplant that keeps the 125 Duke within the A1 performance envelope and turns it into a weapon in the fight for the zenith of the nadir, ie, the entry-level masses yearning to breathe free. KTM has established quite a name for itself as the King of Thumpers with a proven off-road record, but today I’m going to take a look and see how the littlest Duke stacks up against the rest of the 125 cc streetbike field.

Continue reading for my review of the KTM 125 Duke.

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2017 - 2018 Zero Motorcycles S / SR

2017 - 2018 Zero Motorcycles S / SR

Big Boosts In Range and Charging Rates For 2018

Riding the tailwinds of waxing public interest and expanding infrastructure, Zero Motorcycles advanced ’The Cause’ with new improvements and adjustments to its street-centric “S” and “SR” models last year. Part of that was the addition of a more powerful motor that generates increased torque and horsepower as well as a smaller battery pack for short urban trips; all good stuff for increased fun and flexibility, necessary factors if the company wants to further its push into the mainstream. For 2018, Zero adds more range and quicker charging times.

Continue reading for my review of the Zero S and SR.

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2017 - 2018 Zero Motorcycles FX / FXS

2017 - 2018 Zero Motorcycles FX / FXS

Faster Recharging And New Batteries for 2018

The EV sector is booming, and as it’s grown it has expanded into more and more genres. Zero Motorcycles is all about the electrics, and has pushed beyond the straight-up street and adventure categories into dual-sport and supermoto territory. The off-road capable FX enters the 2018 MY off an update last year alongside its urban-jungle sibling, the FXS, for a dynamic duo of EV fun with more torque and more horsepower than previous model years, plus other upgrades to the drivetrain to include a wider final-drive belt and improvements to the power packs.

Continue reading for my review of the Zero FX and FXS.

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2018 Ducati Scrambler Street Classic

2018 Ducati Scrambler Street Classic

Put A Monster Engine In A Scrambler And What Do You Get?

After its overseas debut last year in Abu Dhabi, Dubai and elsewhere, Ducati is bringing the Scrambler Street Classic to the U.S. market for the 2018 model year. The Street Classic borrows from the ’70s custom scene for its unique spin on the scrambler platform and an 803 cc L-twin that delivers 73 horsepower to maintain the same level of performance as the rest of the mid-size Scrambler family. ABS provides the only electronic safety equipment, but if you’re looking for techno-gadgetry, then you’re definitely looking at the wrong type of bike, no matter the manufacturer. Ducati continues to morph its Scrambler lineup in an attempt to get as much mileage as possible out of it, and who can blame them. The range has proven itself to be very popular with the masses and a blank canvas for personalization. Are they jumping the shark yet? Let’s find out.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Street Classic.

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2017 - 2019 Honda Grom

2017 - 2019 Honda Grom

The Little Ankle-Biter That Could

Introduced in 2014, the Grom from Honda is a compact bike with sportbike styling, two-up capabilities if you don’t mind having to Fred-Flintstone the take-off, has amazing fuel economy, and offers a little something more for folks who might consider a scooter in this size-range. Marketed in other countries as the MSX125, the Motrac M3, and the Skyteam M3, the Grom is a spunky little — “little” being the operative word here — motorcycle, good for folks new to two wheels or for anyone else who wants a fun ride. It’s not fast, but that’s not the point.

Continue reading for my review of the Honda Grom.

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2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled

2017 - 2018 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled

The Differences, However Minor, Make All The Difference

Ducati’s Scrambler line grew yet again in the 2017 model year with the addition of the Café Racer and Desert Sled. The Scrambler range has proven to be a veritable mine of possibilities as Ducati capable model in the entire range, and the Café Racer, well, it comes set up to look cool in an urban environment. Both rides get the same 803 cc mill that powers the rest of the Scrambler variants along with much the same chassis, but the differences, however minor, make all the difference in the world.

Continue reading for my review of the Ducati Scrambler Café Racer & Desert Sled.

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2016 - 2018 Triumph Street Twin

2016 - 2018 Triumph Street Twin

Packing More Power Than Its Predecessor

The Triumph Bonneville line has underwent numerous redesigns over the years, but always kept that classic British flavor and dated panache that is both aesthetically pleasing and rooted in its own past. The Bonneville Street Twin joined Triumph’s new-in-2016 Modern Classics group that includes the Bonneville T120 family and the Thruxton R. Today, I want to take a look at the Street Twin and see how well Trumpet did in upholding the reputation of the venerable Bonnie line.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Street Twin.

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2016 - 2018 Moto Guzzi V9 Bobber & V9 Roamer

2016 - 2018 Moto Guzzi V9 Bobber & V9 Roamer

Part Of The Retro-Styled V9 Line

Moto Guzzi launched a brand-new model family in 2016 that pays tribute to the past efforts of custom bike builders, of which there are no shortage given ’Guzzi’s long history on both sides of the pond. The all-new V9 range included the mainstream-custom “Roamer,” and the more sinister “Bobber” with a more outlaw-looking blackout treatment. Not only was the chassis new, but MG built a brand-new 853 cc engine with which to power this mid-size, standard cruiser.

Continue reading for my look at the Moto Guzzi V9 Roamer and V9 Bobber.

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2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Carbon Dark

2018 Moto Guzzi V7 III Carbon Dark

The V7 III Lineup Gets A Black Sheep

Moto Guzzi expands its third-generation V7 family with the new-for-2018 V7 III Carbon Dark. The “Dark” straddles two worlds with design aspects that hail back to the original V7s while touching on the custom culture as well for an interesting blend of the nostalgic and the new. For power, the factory stuck with “the seven-fifty from Mandello” to drive the Dark with 44 pounds of grunt on tap with a traction-control system and ABS brakes to aid the rider in maintaining control, just the kind of stuff you want for an entry-level ride. Manageable power with a solid pedigree and good looks to boot, the V7 III Carbon Dark seems to have a lot to offer for under 10 grand.

Continue reading for my look at the Moto Guzzi V7 III Carbon Dark.

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2017 - 2018 Triumph Street Scrambler

2017 - 2018 Triumph Street Scrambler

More Street Twin Than Scrambler, But Still Fun

Triumph has been getting some mileage out of its new 900 cc engine, and this mill drives yet another mid-size ride for the “Street Twin” family: the Street Scrambler. As the name implies, this bike is built mainly for urban use but comes with an off-road capability one simply does not get from a straight-up streetbike. The Street Scrambler brings rider-friendly performance and stable handling to the table, but in a market glutted with scrambler models from all over the globe, one has to wonder if that is enough to stay competitive. Let’s delve into this Triumph and find out.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Street Scrambler.

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2016 - 2018 Norton Dominator

2016 - 2018 Norton Dominator

Street-Legal Version Of The Domiracer

The Dominator from Norton captures the look and feel of the limited-edition Domiracer, but with a more production-friendly and street-legal layout. Norton may have been a bit surprised at the pace at which the Domiracers got snapped up and at the high rate of conversion to street-legal status, but its response was right on target. Powered by an in-house-developed 961 cc parallel twin, the Dominator is quite expensive, but do you get a lot of bike for that dough?

Continue reading for my review of the Norton Dominator.

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2017 - 2018 Benelli TNT300

2017 - 2018 Benelli TNT300

First Ride, Fun, or Commuter, This Could Be Your Huckleberry

Benelli put together the TNT300 “Tornado” with both the entry-level market and the frugal commuter segment in mind. This sporty little ride brings an unintimidating powerplant to the table tucked away in a naked sportbike assembly that fits in with current styling standards and carries more than a little Italian DNA. Sophisticated enough to pass muster with the emissions folks, this ride nevertheless presents a relatively simple alternative to some of the available options on the market today. Competition is stiff in the bottom-tier streetbikes from some very well established names, and while Benelli enjoys some 100-year-plus roots itself, the name now belongs to the Qjian Jiang Group (QJ) based in China. Today I’m going to take a look and see how well the transition is working out for this storied Italian company.

Continue reading for my review of the Benelli TNT300.

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2016 - 2018 SSR Motorsports Snake Eyes

2016 - 2018 SSR Motorsports Snake Eyes

An Old-School Bobber On a Budget

Nothing brings to mind the down-and-dirty custom-bike days of the ’70s and ’80s quite like a UJM-based custom bobber, and SSR Motorsports piles on plenty of that old-school with its street-retro ’Snake Eyes’. Built for the entry-level customer, and anyone looking for a somewhat whimsical nod to the custom culture for that matter. An 18-horsepower, 249 cc thumper drives the thing — plenty for trips around town or campus, but the real story here is with the overall vibe that looks to be straight out of the garage right off the showroom floor. Join me while I take a closer look at this fun little ride that so clearly is looking to capture part of the U.S. market.

Continue reading for my review of the SSR Motorsports Snakes Eyes.

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2015 - 2018 Harley-Davidson SuperLow

2015 - 2018 Harley-Davidson SuperLow

Unintimidating For New Folks, Yet Fun For Experienced Riders

The SuperLow line saw few changes into the 2017 model year, and carried that into 2018. Powered by the 883 cc Evolution engine, the XL 883L delivers modest performance and nimble handling. The slammed suspension puts the rider’s butt close to the ground where even the shortest inseams can feel confident and in control with both feet down flat. While this ride isn’t quite as entry level as the Street 500/750, it is the smallest of Harley-Davidson’s traditional designs and typically serves as a trainer bike for folks interested in air-cooled cruisers.

Continue reading for my review of the Harley-Davidson SuperLow.

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2016 - 2018 Triumph Bonneville T120 / T120 Black

2016 - 2018 Triumph Bonneville T120 / T120 Black

Old-School Styling Outside, Modern Tech Inside

Triumph carries the Bonneville name into a new generation with the Bonneville T120 and T120 “Black.” Such a classic name deserves to be treated with dignity with a certain amount of retro appeal, and the factory took extraordinary steps to keep this ride as old school as possible. The designers didn’t go too far though; a modern mill cranks out 80 ponies and over 77 pounds of grunt under a ride-by-wire throttle and traction control. A modern ride through and through, but with a very definite, and dated, curb appeal. Today I’m going to take a look at the pair to see what goodies Trumpet has in store for us, and what compromises were made in the process.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Bonneville T120 and T120 Black.

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2018 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

2018 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

A First Look At The New 650 Twin

Royal Enfield hit the 2018 model year running with an all-new, 650 Twin engine that comes with a brand-new Interceptor wrapped around it. All new from the ground up, the Interceptor 650 has improved handling and agility that its single-cylinder predecessors just couldn’t match. It’s a hot-hot release in its homeland, but will the U.S. market receive it with as much enthusiasm?

Continue reading for my first look at the Royal Enfield Interceptor 650.

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2017 - 2018 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

2017 - 2018 Harley-Davidson Street Rod

Harley’s Hot Little Urban Commuter

Traffic-carving performance isn’t the first thing I think of when hearing the name Harley-Davidson, but the MoCo is going about changing that perception with the new-from-2017 Street Rod 750. While it is, in fact, based on the current Street 750, multiple changes in the setup and equipment turn it into another animal entirely. Shorter steering geometry, a more aggressive rider triangle and a more powerful engine come together in H-D’s most decisive push so far into the sport-standard market. A bold move to be sure, and as Harley enters territory traditionally dominated by the Asian and European manufacturers, it won’t enjoy the same name power that it does in the cruising and touring sector. With all that in mind I want to take a look at this ambitious ride today to see what’s new and how well it stacks up to its entrenched competition. I think it’s safe to take it as a given that the MoCo has its work cut out for it, to say the very least, so let’s get started.

Continue reading for my review of the Harley-Davidson Street Rod.

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2016 - 2018 Triumph Bonneville T100 - T100 Black

2016 - 2018 Triumph Bonneville T100 - T100 Black

Bonneville Was Never Better Than This

Triumph started the Bonneville legacy all the way back in 1959, and it is a name that the factory is still taking to the bank today. The newly-repowered “Bonnie” T-100 and T-100 Black boast a 900 cc mill set in what is more or less a T-120 chassis. At 59 horsepower, the T-100 plant makes for a newbie-friendly riding experience while the weight savings around the bike imparts a nimble nature that you don’t really feel with the big-brother T-120. Classic looks abound on the base model, while the “Black” takes a turn down memory lane to the heyday of garage custom standards with a large dose of blackout treatment for a more sinister look. So, not only do we have a bit of a spread on design, but we also have a balanced machine that can introduce folks to the joys of riding while remaining fun enough to keep experienced riders interested. If that sounds good to you, read on to see what else the T-100 family has to offer.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Bonneville T100 and T100 Black.

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2016 - 2018 SYM Wolf Classic 150

2016 - 2018 SYM Wolf Classic 150

The Budget-Minded Classic UJM

We usually think of the Sanyang Motor Co., Ltd — better known to us as SYM — as a scooter company, so when looking at their little Wolf Classic 150, I expected ...well, I expected less than what I saw. Unlike the Wolf 125 and 250 released in Asian markets that had a definite sport-bike look, the Wolf Classic has a UJM styling reminiscent of the imports back in the late ’60s and early ’70s. Does it look like the old Hondas? It should. SYM made the Honda 125s for a few decades back so they are well acquainted with the style.

Continue reading for my review of the SYM Wolf Classic 150.

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