2020 Suzuki Katana

2020 Suzuki Katana
- image 832139
  • Suzuki Katana
  • Year:
    2020
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    inline-4
  • Displacement:
    999 cc
  • Top Speed:
    160 mph (Est.)
  • Price:
    11399
  • Price:

The Reinterpreted “Samurai Sword” Heats Up The GSX-S Stable

Suzuki reaches back all the way to the early ’80s for the design inspiration behind the new 2020 Katana GSX-S1000SM. The reinterpreted “samurai sword” serves as a sportier alternative to Suzuki’s GSX-S1000 platform for those who are looking for an everyday ride with roots. Modernized looks pair with a modernized drivetrain in an attempt to revive the line, and of course, it rocks the expected ride-quality adjustments that are nearly ubiquitous at this point even if they aren’t quite guaranteed in this genre.

 

Latest Suzuki GSX-S news and reviews:

2018 - 2019 Suzuki GSX-S1000

2018 - 2019 Suzuki GSX-S1000

The Beauty Of A Gixxer Engine In A Naked Chassis

Engine upgrades joined other improvements in the 2018 model year as Suzuki pushes to keep its sport-standard-sector momentum going with the GSX-S1000. The family tree branched yet again with the new-in-2018, blackout GSX-S1000Z and Suzuki dropped the “F” in favor of the “FZ” for last year. The family now has even more of what it takes to dominate the street with a Gixxer engine in a naked bike chassis.

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2019 Suzuki GSX-S1000FZ

2019 Suzuki GSX-S1000FZ

Suzuki Brings Sportbike Performance To The Touring Market

Suzuki’s GSX-S family has always been about bringing sportbike performance to the commuter and touring market, and the 2019 GSX-S1000FZ looks to be Suzuki’s new flagship model in that particular stable. The “FZ” combines the beating heart from a Gixxer with top-end suspension and brakes in a slightly more relaxed package to put the “sport” back in sport-tourer. Suzuki finishes up with the two most common ride-quality/safety subsystems – TC and ABS – to make the FZ competitive on the world stage all the way around.

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2020 Suzuki Katana

2020 Suzuki Katana

The Reinterpreted “Samurai Sword” Heats Up The GSX-S Stable

Suzuki reaches back all the way to the early ’80s for the design inspiration behind the new 2020 Katana GSX-S1000SM. The reinterpreted “samurai sword” serves as a sportier alternative to Suzuki’s GSX-S1000 platform for those who are looking for an everyday ride with roots. Modernized looks pair with a modernized drivetrain in an attempt to revive the line, and of course, it rocks the expected ride-quality adjustments that are nearly ubiquitous at this point even if they aren’t quite guaranteed in this genre.

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2019 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

2019 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

New Fuel-Injected Engine For An Even More Thrilling Ride

Suzuki shuffled its “standard” selections ahead of MY2019 with a new powerplant based on the proven Gixxer mill. The GSX-S750 lineup includes an ABS model and a custom-flavored, “Z” blackout package that the factory hopes will cover all the bases in the mid-size naked-sport sector. Additionally, it rocks a robust electronics suite with engine-control features as well as safety-related goodies. Power and agility (read: fun) come together with Spartan looks and a modicum of comfort on these bikes, so let’s dive right into the details to see what else Suzuki has in store for us.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S750 ABS and GSX-S750Z.

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Top 10 Sports-Tourers of 2018

Top 10 Sports-Tourers of 2018

Combining the performance of a sport bike with the long-distance capabilities

Call them bikes that perfectly fill the gap between thrilling sportsbike and the gigantic touring machines, sports-tourers are simply long haul motorcycles with sportbike expectations built to get the best out of that long way home. Here is our list of 2018’s top ten machines offering the same capabilities as touring bikes but without sacrificing any of the sporty performance.

They tend to be a bit lighter and corner well but aren’t the most comfortable. The riding position tends to be a bit more relaxed compared to sports machines, there’s better wind protection, much better pillion comforts, transmission with lower gearing and usually a whole quick release pannier system designed in.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-S125

2018 Suzuki GSX-S125

A Contender In The Battle For The 125 cc Class

While most eyes are on the battle for supremacy of the upper-displacement brackets, the fight between the flyweights rages on, and Suzuki’s newest weapon is its GSX-S125. Like the rest of the “Gixxess” family, it comes based on the “R” version but is stripped of its body panels to become a proper naked sportbike. The 124 cc powerplant stays within the A1 licensing envelope with 10.8 kW to serve as a true entry-level bike cum indoctrination piece capable of drawing in the very youngest riders, and that’s exactly how it’s set up; to be as rider-friendly as possible with a low curb weight of 133 kg and manageable, 785 mm seat height. Today I’m going to dig in a little deeper to see what all Suzuki has going on with this decidedly important little ride.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S125.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

2018 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

Back For 2018 With A New Attitude

Suzuki buffs its GSX-S750 for the 2018 model year with a new style, 110-plus horsepower plant and revamped brakes. Its darker sibling, the “Z” variant, adds ABS to the stock equipment package along with its blackout panache. Electronic fandanglery abounds with traction control and an Idle-Speed Control along with a Low-RPM Assist feature to help deliver safe, controllable power even at low speeds. How does it all stack up? Well, I’m going to take a look at these two rides today, and my perspective is that these are important models in a market-significant displacement bracket, and they have some pretty big shoes to fill. Let’s see how they measure up.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S750 and GSX-S750Z.

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2016 - 2017 Suzuki GSX-S1000 / GSX-S1000F

2016 - 2017 Suzuki GSX-S1000 / GSX-S1000F

Suzuki launched a legacy when it introduced the world to the GSX-R750 back in 1985, and the factory has added to that family tree with the release of the new-in-2016 GSX-S1000, and built upon it once again in 2017 with the GSX-S1000, the ABS-equipped version of same, and the S1000F. Consider this bike the street-wise cousin to the more race-centric GSX-R range.

The GSX-S1000 does more than bear a passing familial resemblance however, it actually shares parts and technology with its MotoGP relative, including the 999 cc engine used in the GSX-R1000. Set up for street domination, this bike proves that the GSX legacy is alive and well.

Continue reading for the my review of the Suzuki GSX-S1000, GSX-S1000 ABS, and GSX-S1000F.

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2015 - 2016 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

2015 - 2016 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

Suzuki made waves around the world when it released its original GSX-R back in the mid ’80s. Essentially, it was a street-legal race bike built on the proven GSX platform that came out in 1980, and it was a big hit with the motorcycling masses. In 2015, the GSX offspring carried on the family name with the race-centric GSX-R range, and the more street-errific GSX-S models. While the gixxers are true sportbikes, Suzuki bills the GSX-S as a “standard” motorcycle within the Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM) category, and tunes it specifically for dedicated street use.

If you think that makes this a “de-tuned” bike, I invite you to grab a fistful of throttle and get back to me. The engine runs a more street-friendly cam, and has some modifications to the intake and exhaust tracts, but it’s essentially the same mill Suzuki uses to power the GSX-R750 range. Not a bad place to start, if you ask me.

Today I want to take a look at the GSX-S750 and GSX-S750Z. Suzuki carried the S750 into 2016 with naught but a difference in paint selection to choose between the years, but the “Z” version won’t see any new units in the coming year.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S750 and GSX-S750Z.

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