Motorcycles Suzuki Suzuki GSX

2018 Suzuki GSX-R1000

2018 Suzuki GSX-R1000
- image 777414
  • Suzuki GSX-R1000
  • Year:
    2018
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    inline-4
  • Displacement:
    1000 cc
  • Price:
    14699
  • Price:

The Long-Needed Update Makes A Big Impact

Suzuki gave its iconic sportbike an overhaul for 2017 with a new liquid-cooled engine, a new frame, new ECM, new ride-by-wire throttle bodies and a host of other goodies to keep this ride current and relevant in its sixth generation. The engineers at the factory show their love for the GSX-R1000 by making it the most powerful and hardest accelerating Gixxer-with-a-single-R to date with a horsepower boost that pushes the claimed figure up to 199 ponies at the shaft. Simultaneously, the engineers made the foundation both lighter and stronger so even more of the available power makes it to pavement. End result; more of what we expect from the Gixxer family.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-R1000.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-S125

2018 Suzuki GSX-S125

A Contender In The Battle For The 125 cc Class

While most eyes are on the battle for supremacy of the upper-displacement brackets, the fight between the flyweights rages on, and Suzuki’s newest weapon is its GSX-S125. Like the rest of the “Gixxess” family, it comes based on the “R” version but is stripped of its body panels to become a proper naked sportbike. The 124 cc powerplant stays within the A1 licensing envelope with 10.8 kW to serve as a true entry-level bike cum indoctrination piece capable of drawing in the very youngest riders, and that’s exactly how it’s set up; to be as rider-friendly as possible with a low curb weight of 133 kg and manageable, 785 mm seat height. Today I’m going to dig in a little deeper to see what all Suzuki has going on with this decidedly important little ride.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S125.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-R1000

2018 Suzuki GSX-R1000

The Long-Needed Update Makes A Big Impact

Suzuki gave its iconic sportbike an overhaul for 2017 with a new liquid-cooled engine, a new frame, new ECM, new ride-by-wire throttle bodies and a host of other goodies to keep this ride current and relevant in its sixth generation. The engineers at the factory show their love for the GSX-R1000 by making it the most powerful and hardest accelerating Gixxer-with-a-single-R to date with a horsepower boost that pushes the claimed figure up to 199 ponies at the shaft. Simultaneously, the engineers made the foundation both lighter and stronger so even more of the available power makes it to pavement. End result; more of what we expect from the Gixxer family.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-R1000.

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2017 - 2018 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

2017 - 2018 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

The Fiery-Eyed Pegdraggers Rejoice!

Coming off a fresh update in 2017, Suzuki carries its GSX-R1000R into MY18 with a new color palette, but little else in the way of changes. The next-gen “Gixxer” 1000 brings an all-new 999.8 cc powerplant to the table with a claimed 199 horsepower at the shaft and a whole passel of electronic goodies to help manage all those ponies. Traction control, lean-sensitive ABS, launch control and more, Suzuki’s flagship literbike delivers a taste of track-day fun with overlapping safety nets to help keep us mortal, non-professional riders dirty-side down as we explore our electronically augmented performance envelope. MotoGP tech influences the design to give the rider a little taste of track-day performance, or at the very least, ’performance light.’

Continue reading for my review of the GSX-R1000R.

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Suzuki set to bring back the "Katana' brand

Suzuki set to bring back the "Katana’ brand

The Japanese registered name protection for Katana and the logo

It was at the 2017 EICMA that we first heard of Suzuki’s intentions of bringing the name ‘Katana’ back into the motorcycling realm. Showcasing the ‘Katana 3.0 Concept’, Suzuki was mulling about bringing the concept to production, but somehow lost steam and people didn’t have much to talk about.

Now though, fresh new information has surfaced suggesting that Suzuki has strong intentions of getting it back for real. The Japanese firm has recently filed for a trademark application in the USA for the name ‘Katana’ and a swanky new logo too with the sword. It is more of a logo and name protection really.

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2015 - 2018 Suzuki GSX-R750

2015 - 2018 Suzuki GSX-R750

Not For The Faint Of Heart

Suzuki keeps improving and expanding its signature supersport series, and the 2018 GSX-R carries the torch first ignited by the original Gixxer 750 all the way back in 1984 (or ’85 if you count when it actually was made available for purchase). Granted, the “late model” Gixxers dropped the steel frame in favor of aluminum, and the air-cooled engine has been replaced with a jacketed mill, but the overall mission for the bike remains the same: to provide the general public with the most race-ready production bike available for legal use on the street. Of course, the rest of the market has caught up to Suzuki and the supersport segment is flooded with similarly capable rides — and a good number of more capable sleds — though the most race-tastic of them are far more expensive than the $12K-ish GSX-R 750. I’ve always had a great deal of respect for the Gixxer family ever since I scared the bejeezus out of myself on one, and I always look forward to revisiting the range, so let’s get to it.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-R750.

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2015 - 2018 Suzuki GSX-R600

2015 - 2018 Suzuki GSX-R600

It’s A Gixxer... ’Nuff Said

The Suzuki GSX-R made a splash all the way back in 1985, and quickly became a motorcycle-household name, complete with a smooth nickname that just rolls right off the tongue. Since then, the Gixxer has been in continuous production over a wide range of engine sizes, and has even been supplemented by the similar, but more street-friendly, GSX-S range. The GSX-R600 continues the family legacy into the 2018 model year powered with a 599 cc engine and sporty handling that is expected in this prestigious line. Today I want to take a look at what Suzuki has done to keep this long-running family viable and competitive against its many adversaries on both track and street.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-R600.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

2018 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

Back For 2018 With A New Attitude

Suzuki buffs its GSX-S750 for the 2018 model year with a new style, 110-plus horsepower plant and revamped brakes. Its darker sibling, the “Z” variant, adds ABS to the stock equipment package along with its blackout panache. Electronic fandanglery abounds with traction control and an Idle-Speed Control along with a Low-RPM Assist feature to help deliver safe, controllable power even at low speeds. How does it all stack up? Well, I’m going to take a look at these two rides today, and my perspective is that these are important models in a market-significant displacement bracket, and they have some pretty big shoes to fill. Let’s see how they measure up.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S750 and GSX-S750Z.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-R125

2018 Suzuki GSX-R125

A Spunky 125 cc Sportbike

Suzuki doubles down in the worldwide race to the bottom with its newly-redesigned GSX-R125. This pocket-rocket carries the undeniable genetic markers and the typical, race-tastic visage associated with the family. Engine output falls just shy of 15 horsepower (11 kW) and displacement is just under the 125 cc mark as well, so British riders can use it on the road with just a CBT certificate. This is no accident, since indoctrination is best when started young, and only good things can come from instilling some brand loyalty right at the entry level. Sure, there are plenty of 125 cc two-wheelers out there, but many are cheap Chinese imports and the rest are scooters, so there’s definitely room in the market for a trainer bike with the name power and reputation of the Suzuki GSX-R family. Personally, I rather like these small-displacement sportbikes. Their simplicity is refreshing, and what they lack in top-end, they make up with handling which is where the fun is, anyway.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-R125.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-S1000

2018 Suzuki GSX-S1000

The Beauty Of A Gixxer Engine In A Naked Chassis

Suzuki’s race-tastic GSX-R family was a game changer when it hit the market 30-plus years ago, and its streetwise GSX-S range expanded that success. The factory expanded that footprint again in ’16 by bumping the 750 cc mill up to an (almost) even liter. This year, the family tree branched yet again with the new-for-2018, blackout GSX-S1000Z. Engine upgrades join other improvements for the 2018 model year as Suzuki pushes to keep its sport-standard-sector momentum going. I do consider this something of a risk as the market shifts to favor the youngest generation of riders with small-displacement engines and retro/hipster-style designs, but for the time being there seems to be enough support for the liter bikes. At least Suzuki hopes there is anyway.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S1000.

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2017 Suzuki GSX-R 1000/R

2017 Suzuki GSX-R 1000/R

The King Of Sportbikes is back, better than ever, ready to reign.

In a world where outright horsepower and straight-line speed hold centre stage, this Japanese brand’s Superbikes have always been the epitome of a reputation for being the most practical superbikes in all of its class respectively. There is no doubt regarding the fact that Suzuki has one of the most expansive and versatile lineups of superbikes and high capacity motorcycles in the country and have become a serious conscience for sportbikes in the country.

Of all that we have, the 2001 entry kid GSX-R1000 is regarded as one of the most usable supersport bikes on sale in the two-wheeler market, which is tamable effectively by both the amateur as well as seasonal bikers. Launched to the world almost three decades ago, the GSX-R 1000 has humbled more than a million customers and has single-handedly transformed the open sportbike class constantly. People soon called it The King of Sportbikes. Then competition happened and it soon lost the throne to the other European and Japanese lords.

Suzuki has regularly managed to update the GSX-R1000 time and again with a series of minimal cosmetic and mechanical upgrades. For this 6th generation, however, the folks at Suzuki are determined to restore the GSX-R1000 to its throne and become the top performing motorcycle to the world to see. Built by engineers with years of experience and dominations in production-based Superbike, Superstock and Endurance races worldwide, and most importantly the WSBK MotoGP technology, the 2017 GSX-R 1000 is touted to become the most compact, the most aerodynamic and the best-handling GSX-R 1000 ever. Let’s have a look at this new King:

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2018 Suzuki GSX250R

2018 Suzuki GSX250R

A Mighty Little Sportbike

After years of bigger/better/faster, many of the world’s top sportbike manufacturers took a step back and expanded downward into the pocket-rocket displacements. It’s unclear whether this was a response to a growing demand for small-engine sportbikes, or if the Powers-That-Be decided that manageable, entry-level trainers were needed to keep the kids from getting in over their heads right out of the gate, but that all the big names are coming out with 250-300 cc versions of their proven, big-bore bikes is a certainty. Suzuki jumps on that bandwagon with its GSX250R, a sportbike with all the genetic markers of the Katana family, and exactly what one would expect from one of the Big Four. All-new for 2018, the 250R is set to enter the race to the bottom, so without further ado, let’s see what all Suzuki has going on with this crotch-rocket trainer.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX250R.

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Bennetts Suzuki Signs Michael Dunlop For 2017 Season

Bennetts Suzuki Signs Michael Dunlop For 2017 Season

Senior TT and 2016 Superbike winner Michael Dunlop signs to join the Suzuki team for a number of races starting with the North West race in Northern Ireland, Mr. Dunlop’s home turf. From there we’ll see him at the Isle of Mann TT — arguably his home-away-from-home — where he will go for his 14th win with his new team.

Continue reading for more from Michael Dunlop.

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2016 - 2017 Suzuki GSX-S1000 / GSX-S1000F

2016 - 2017 Suzuki GSX-S1000 / GSX-S1000F

Suzuki launched a legacy when it introduced the world to the GSX-R750 back in 1985, and the factory has added to that family tree with the release of the new-in-2016 GSX-S1000, and built upon it once again in 2017 with the GSX-S1000, the ABS-equipped version of same, and the S1000F. Consider this bike the street-wise cousin to the more race-centric GSX-R range.

The GSX-S1000 does more than bear a passing familial resemblance however, it actually shares parts and technology with its MotoGP relative, including the 999 cc engine used in the GSX-R1000. Set up for street domination, this bike proves that the GSX legacy is alive and well.

Continue reading for the my review of the Suzuki GSX-S1000, GSX-S1000 ABS, and GSX-S1000F.

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2015 - 2016 Suzuki GSX-R1000 / GSX-R1000 Commemorative Edition

2015 - 2016 Suzuki GSX-R1000 / GSX-R1000 Commemorative Edition

The GSX-R1000 has been around for a minute, since it replaced the GSX-R1100 back in ’01 in fact, and 2016 sees the release of a total of three Gixxer 1000s with the GSX-R1000, the ABS version and the Commemorative model up for grabs. I’ve had an appreciation for Gixxers ever since I scared myself on one back in ’94, and the fact that Suzuki has managed to keep the family relevant for so long makes me appreciate it even more.

Buyer enthusiasm for race bikes is starting to wane a bit in favor of some of the more naked, streetwise machines, but Suzuki doesn’t let that dissuade them as they push right ahead with their flagship production racebike. Join me while I take a look at what Suzuki has going on with this latest effort to keep things going with the venerable Gixxer line.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-R1000.

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2015 Suzuki GSX1250FAZ

2015 Suzuki GSX1250FAZ

The GSX1250FAZ retains all the excellent qualities of the GSX1250FA but adds a fresh look that grabs attention while remaining tasteful and refined. The Z’s special styling is delivered by contrasting wheel stripes and a blue/red/black three colour graphic scheme running from front to rear, ensuring a unique appearance from any angle.

Continue reading for more information on the Suzuki GSX1250FAZ.

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2015 - 2016 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

2015 - 2016 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

Suzuki made waves around the world when it released its original GSX-R back in the mid ’80s. Essentially, it was a street-legal race bike built on the proven GSX platform that came out in 1980, and it was a big hit with the motorcycling masses. In 2015, the GSX offspring carried on the family name with the race-centric GSX-R range, and the more street-errific GSX-S models. While the gixxers are true sportbikes, Suzuki bills the GSX-S as a “standard” motorcycle within the Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM) category, and tunes it specifically for dedicated street use.

If you think that makes this a “de-tuned” bike, I invite you to grab a fistful of throttle and get back to me. The engine runs a more street-friendly cam, and has some modifications to the intake and exhaust tracts, but it’s essentially the same mill Suzuki uses to power the GSX-R750 range. Not a bad place to start, if you ask me.

Today I want to take a look at the GSX-S750 and GSX-S750Z. Suzuki carried the S750 into 2016 with naught but a difference in paint selection to choose between the years, but the “Z” version won’t see any new units in the coming year.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S750 and GSX-S750Z.

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2015 Suzuki GSX-R600 Moto GP

2015 Suzuki GSX-R600 Moto GP

A lightweight chassis featuring a compact wheelbase and race-developed suspension. A compact, powerful 4-cylinder engine delivering a real-world demonstration of advanced race-proven technology. The GSX-R600 - designed to be The Top Performer in its class, a total package designed to Own the Racetrack.

Continue reading for more information on the Suzuki GSX-R600 Moto GP.

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2015 Suzuki GSX-S750ZA

2015 Suzuki GSX-S750ZA

Overview
Born On The Track. Raised On The Street.
Experience the futuristic combination of leading technology, cutting edge style and outstanding performance. Designed with the competitive spirit of the GSX-R750, the NEW 2015 GSX-S750ZA has the power plant of the GSX-R750 with comfort and versatile riding in its sights. With a powerful 749cm3 four cylinder fuel-injection engine combined with 145mm of ground clearance and ABS brakes*, no road will ever hold you back from full throttle (...)

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Suzuki Showcases Sculpted GSX Concept

Suzuki Showcases Sculpted GSX Concept

Concept bikes come in many shapes and sizes so expectations can range from the muted to the out-of-this-world. Suzuki, though, took it a step further when it introduced the Concept GSX, the company’s next-generation sportsbike. To be clear, it’s not really a traditional-looking concept motorcycle in that it’s made up of actual motorcycle parts. Instead, Suzuki depicted the concept through a sculpture. Yep, a sculpture.

It’s a novel idea, but it does leave a lot of details to the imagination. I’m not quite sure what to make of it at this point because the concept, in its sculpted form, has a little Tron influence to it. See the lack of space between the wheels and the frame? Does it mean that the new GSX will carry that particular design? The only clear detail of the concept is the evolved look of the current GSX-R lamp design, which looks a little tighter and more purposeful than the current version. The concept also looks to be tighter and more packed than the current model. The exhaust is shorter and has a funny shape while the seat is wider than it is in the current version.

Other than that, the Concept GSX doesn’t show a lot of what we can expect from the next-generation sportsbike. Is it going to have a naked frame that bares the engine? While I’m at it, what kind of engine will it have? And where are the side mirrors? The concept creates more questions than answers, but that’s exactly the reaction Suzuki wants out of this concept. There will be some discussions about the bike ahead of the next-generation GSX’s arrival and for a company like Suzuki that has been relegated into the shadows in recent years, that’s already a major breakthrough.

Continue reading to learn more about the Suzuki Concept GSX.

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Roger Hayden To Ride Commemorative GSX-R1000 At The Indianapolis Grand Prix

Roger Hayden To Ride Commemorative GSX-R1000 At The Indianapolis Grand Prix

American rider Roger Hayden will be in attendance at the 2015 Red Bull Indianapolis Grand Prix with a special Suzuki GSX-R decked out in a special livery to commemorate the bike’s 30th anniversary. It’s going to be a big weekend for the GSX-R and Suzuki is making sure that the bike gets the attention it deserves.

As such, Hayden will be riding a GSX-R1000 that’s been dressed up in the red and black colors that adorned Kevin Schwantz’s bike when it made its debut at the AMA Superbike round in Yoshimura, Japan back in 1986. Hayden himself will be dressed for the occasion, which in this case is a custom-commemorative race suit that’s consistent with what his Yoshimura Superbike crew will wear. Heck, even the tire warmers will carry the same tribute livery for one of the most important race bikes to compete in the US.

All together, Hayden and his entire crew will use the weekend to celebrate a momentous occasion in Suzuki’s long and storied motor racing history. The team will be competing in the Indy MotoAmerica Superbike race, determined, I think, to win it for the Suzuki GSX-R1000. That would be a fine tribute to the bike. It’s fitting, too, since the GSX-R holds the record as the all-time wins leader in AMA Superbike history. More importantly, it’s also the same bike that’s largely credited for being the first of its kind to bring cutting edge Grand Prix design and technology to the public roads.

Anybody who knows about the history of motorcycle racing in the US still hold reverence to the success that’s been credited to the GSX-R. So as Suzuki celebrates the bike’s 30th anniversary, there’s no better way to pay homage to one of the finest machines the AMA Superbike has ever seen than by celebrating its anniversary in the Brickyard, long considered as America’s most hallowed racing ground.

Continue reading to read more about Suzuki’s 30th anniversary plans for the GSX-R.

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Suzuki Issues Recall For GSX-S1000 In The UK

Suzuki Issues Recall For GSX-S1000 In The UK

Suzuki has become the latest motorcycle company to issue a recall for one of its own models after announcing that 174 registered units of the GSX-S1000 and GSX-S1000F in the UK could have issues with their radiator hose clearance.

Suzuki UK didn’t specify what kind of issues these radiator hose clearances have, opting only to say that despite not having any reported issues in the UK, the company deemed that “customer safety and satisfaction” was its utmost priority, thus the decision to instigate a recall to get affected models fitted with “a new component” to avoid any issues in the future.

It must be noted that the recall notice was issued in the UK, not in the US. That’s not to say that GSX-S1000 and GSX-1000F bikes here are free and clear from any potential problems. That’s why it might be prudent for owners of these two models here in the US to call their local Suzuki dealerships to ask about the status of their bikes.

If it’s determined that GSX-S1000 and GSX-1000F models in the US are also affected by this recall, don’t be surprised if the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration gets involved and issues its own recall. For now, though, there hasn’t been any announcements made on that end but I’d still be cautious if I were an owner of any of these two models.

Continue reading to read more about Suzuki’s recall of the GSX-S1000 and GSX-S1000F models in the UK.

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Suzuki Celebrates the GSX-R's 30th Anniversary With Retro Livery

Suzuki Celebrates the GSX-R’s 30th Anniversary With Retro Livery

A lot of motorcycle companies are celebrating anniversaries in 2015. One of them is Suzuki, which is actually blowing the candles on the 30th anniversary of one of its most iconic models: the GSX-R1000. This celebration may not have the same level of grandeur as other anniversaries on tap this year, but don’t tell that to Suzuki.

By and large, the GSX-R1000 has been one of the company’s most enduring models, first gaining entry into the market in 1985 before skyrocketing in popularity thanks in large part to the racing exploits of Kevin Schwantz. Fittingly enough, Suzuki dusted off the bike’s iconic blue and white livery for the special occasion as a fitting tribute to the legacy it has cultivated in the three decades that it’s been around. Suzuki’s MotoGP riders, Aleix Espargaro and Maverick Vinales were even seen sporting the same limited edition paint scheme on their respective bikes at the Deutschland round of the 2015 MotoGP season over the weekend.

It’s a noteworthy tribute to a bike that has given Suzuki so much racing success in the past 30 years. The GSX-R1000 and all its past iterations including the first GSX-R has been one of the most celebrated racing bikes in the world. That’s probably a big reason why Suzuki is spending so much of its time and resources to give the bike the anniversary hat tip it deserves.

Remember, the GSX-R has a long and proud history of not only winning races, but also winning championships. You only need to look at its status as the most successful manufacturer in the AMA Superbike series with 13 national titles to understand why the bike means so much to Suzuki. Its track record of success dates back to its founding years in 1985 and has continued all the way to present times where the GSX-R1000 remains a true contender in whatever motorcycle racing series it’s a part of this season.

The GSX-R1000’s 30th anniversary may not seem like much to other people, but for those who know its place in Suzuki’s acclaimed racing history, the GSX-R1000 is well within its rights to celebrate its 30 years of existence and toast to at least another 30 more.

Continue reading to read more about Suzuku’s special livery for the GSX-RM1000.

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2015 Suzuki GSX1250SE

2015 Suzuki GSX1250SE

The 2015 GSX1250SE — available in limited markets — is the 1,255 cc member of the Suzuki GSX lineup, closest spec-wise to the new 2016 GSX-S1000 and a much beefier version of the GSX-750. With ample saddlebags and rear case, a 19-liter fuel tank, comfortable seating and suspension travel that’s almost into offroad range, the GSX1250SE fits the bill as a tourer or fully luggaged sportbike for travel on both smooth pavement and less-than-well-maintained roads.

Continue reading for my review of the 2015 Suzuki GSX1250SE.

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Video: Suzuki Dominates Opening Round Of FIM Endurance Championship At Le Mans

Video: Suzuki Dominates Opening Round Of FIM Endurance Championship At Le Mans

The Suzuki Endurance Racing Team has dominated the FIM Endurance World Championship in such a laughable manner that the Yamaha Racing GMT 94 Michelin’s championship win in 2014 is looking more and more like an aberration. After all, SERT has won six of the last eight Endurance World Championship titles, with the only notable exception being Yamaha victories in 2009 and 2014.

This year, the Suzuki Endurance Racing Team is already looking like the team to beat after dominating the season-opening race at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Apparently, the motivation to erase last year’s disappointment is strong within SERT and it showed in Le Mans as the team laid waste to the competition, meeting little resistance on its way to winning the 24 Hours of Le Mans for the 11th time in the last 15 years. That’s domination spelled with a capital “D.”

The extent of Suzuki’s dominance even extended to its “junior team,” which ended up winning the Superstock class of the series and finishing fourth overall. The trio of Anthony Delalle, Vincent Philippe, and Eitenne Masson romped their way to a convincing win on the Suzuki GSX-R1000, further illustrating what many of us have known for a long time.

When it comes to the FIM Endurance World Championships, it’s Suzuki, then it’s everybody else. As if winning the 24 Hours of Le Mans isn’t enough vindication for the team, it also released a tribute video of the team’s performance at Le Mans in case anybody missed out on the smackdown it just laid on the historical race track in France.

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2016 Suzuki GSX-S1000F ABS

2016 Suzuki GSX-S1000F ABS

Suzuki carries their heritage GSX-R bikes to the street with the GSX-S models. New for 2016, the GSX-S1000F ABS is a full-fairing version of the 2016 GSX-S1000 ABS. Promoting the GSX-S1000 as a ’standard’ or ’streetfighter’ bike (neither sport nor touring), Suzuki seems to think that simply adding a full fairing qualifies the GSX-S1000F as a ’sport-tourer.’ I disagree. With a pillion that looks like nothing more than a hint of a seat and no storage, I’m not sure how to classify this bike in terms of sport or touring. Let’s just look at it for what it is and see how it shapes up.

Continue reading for my review of the 2016 Suzuki GSX-S1000F ABS

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Suzuki GSF1250 And GSX1250 Get CARB Certification

Suzuki GSF1250 And GSX1250 Get CARB Certification

The 2016 Suzuki GSF1250 and GSX1250 models are good to go in California after the California Air Resources Board released a new executive order certifying the two models. It’s still unclear how Suzuki plans to offer both models, but reports indicate that the GSF1250 will likely come in the form of the partially faired Bandit 1250S that the company revealed at the Intermot show last year.

As for the GSX1250, speculation abounds that Suzuki will use a fully faired version of the GSX1250F that has been dormant in the market for the past three years, last appearing as a 2012 model. It’s worth noting that other markets are still offering the GSX11250F as a 2015 model so it’ll be interesting how Suzuki approaches the bike’s supposed return to the US market.

Both models are expected to feature a 1255 cc inline-four engine, capable of hitting 96 horsepower at 7,500 rp and 80 pound-feet of torque at 3,700 rpm. Likewise, the two models will use a telescopic fork and a rear monoshock with adjustable spring preload and rebound damping for their suspension systems.

One thing to look out for is how the bikes will be designed. If Suzuki follows through on reports that it’s using the Bandit as a start point for the 2016 GSF1250, don’t be surprised if the new bike receives similar styling updates, specifically the new fairing design that covered the sides of the radiator to bolster protection from the wind while also improving the bike’s overall aerodynamic qualities.

Continue reading to read more about the CARB certifications Suzuki got for the GSF1250 and GSX1250 models.

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Suzuki To Celebrate The GSX-R's 30th Anniversary With Series Of Events

Suzuki To Celebrate The GSX-R’s 30th Anniversary With Series Of Events

Run through a list of Suzuki’s most prominent models and you’ll probably see the Hayabusa on top of that list. It’s a fair choice, and an admittedly smart one, too. But Suzuki is far from a one-trick motorcycle company; it also has a handful of models that has stood the test of time and appealed to generations of motorcycle enthusiasts. One such model is the GSX-R sportsbike, which is actually celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. To commemorate the occasion, Suzuki is throwing a season-long shindig as part of its “GSX-R 30 Years of Performance” celebration.

All in all, Suzuki Motor of America will be hosting 10 Anniversary events, with the first already scheduled for April 11 and 12, 2015 at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. The company’s choice of those two dates didn’t happen by accident. It’s launching the event to coincide with the inaugural race of the 2015 MotoAmerica series, making it the perfect setting for Suzuki’s multi-event anniversary bash for one of its iconic models.

As you can expect, Suzuki’s inviting riders of the GSX-, and all other Suzuki motorcycle owners to join in on all of the festivities. The company is even setting up its own hospitality area at the Circuit of the Americas where guests can just chill out and swap war stories with their Suzuki bikes. So if any Suzuki owner out there has no plans this weekend, the COTA circuit makes for a compelling destination so you can spend time with your fellow “Suzuki-sseurs.” All you need to do to gain entry into the exclusive event is to show up and show them a Suzuki vehicle key or your insurance or registration card proving your ownership of any Suzuki vehicle.

In addition to the hospitality area at the COTA circuit, Suzuki will also host the first Suzuki Pit Stop in conjunction with the MotoAmerica Road Racing Championship on Saturday, April 11 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. That event will take place at Barger’s Allsports, Suzuki’s authorized dealer in Waco, Texas. If you’re a Suzuki owner, you’re invited to stop and receive a fuel-up and a quick service check at the expense of the dealership.

Continue reading to read more about Suzuki’s GSX-R 30 Years of Performance.

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Suzuki Takes The Name Suzuki Ecstar in MotoGP Return

Suzuki Takes The Name Suzuki Ecstar in MotoGP Return

Suzuki hasn’t been seen or heard from in the paddock of MotoGP since 2011 when the Japanese bikemaker unexpectedly departed the most prestigious motorcycle racing series in the world. Over the next three seasons, Suzuki didn’t compete in MotoGP, only appearing once last season as a a wild card entry at Valencia, Spain.

Well, Suzuki’s making a triumphant comeback this season and it’s officially returning to MotoGP as the Suzuki Ecstar team.

The Japanese company officially announced the partnership, oddly enough with its own brand of engine oil serving as the titular sponsor of the team. Guess it works better in-house in Suzuki, doesn’t it?

In addition to announcing the team’s official name, the launch also gave us the first glimpse of the newly developed Suzuki GSX-RR that the team is set to use in its first season back in MotoGP. Dressed in the team’s new livery, the pair of GSX-RR models will be ridden by Aleix Espargaro and 2013 Moto3 champion Maverick Vinales. The team definitely picked two pretty exciting young drivers to lead its comeback. In fact, Espargaro already has some experience in MotoGP, finishing last season in seventh overall place while riding for Forward Yamaha.

Suzuki’s return to MotoGP under the Suzuki Ecstar team will undoubtedly add some intrigue to the 2015 MotoGP season, as if it needs to add more storylines to the myriad of juicy subplots already being talked about in the series.

Welcome back, Suzuki. We’re glad to have you back in MotoGP.

Click "continue reading" to read more about the Suzuki’s return to MotoGP under the Suzuki Ecstar name.

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Web Glitch on Suzuki Site Accidentally Reveals Power Output for the GSX-S1000 and GSX-S1000F

Suzuki has gained a reputation as a pretty secretive motorcycle company. Whenever a new Suzuki model comes out, the Japanese bike make ensures that as much information about the bike is kept under wraps. Actually, everybody does this, but Suzuki is probably one of the best at keeping details about its yet-to-be revealed bikes under lock and key.

Recently, though, somebody over at Suzuki, presumably within its online department, bumbled a pretty crucial information about the brand’s new GSX-S1000 and GSX-S1000F bikes. According to Motorrad, the Suzuki website briefly, if not inexplicably, revealed the power figures of the two sports bikes. The information has since been taken down, but for those who are curious to know what it is, the GSX-S1000 and the GSX-S1000F will be packing 145 horsepower at 9,500 rpm. Chalk this incident up to a sudden case of carelessness.

The number isn’t at all surprising, even if Suzuki has taken extraordinary steps to keep it on lockdown. For one, 1000PS interviewed Gerald Steinmann of Suzuki back in October 2014 and he let slip that the GSX-S1000F could pack “more than 160 horsepower.”
145 ponies isn’t at all bad, but it’s still not the “over 160” that I personally thought the bikes were going to have at their disposal. That said, 145 horsepower is still pretty good considering that both bikes are still being powered by old-by-comparison GSX-R1000 motor. In some ways, getting 145 horsepower out of it is actually pretty neat and could go a long way in giving the two GSX-S models the needed bump it needs to compete with some of its highly touted rivals in the sports bike segment.

At the end of the day, though, Suzuki’s decision to take down the output numbers of the two bikes seem to suggest that the company is either still undecided about how much power it can and will have when the bikes are finally ready to head out to market or it’s just really protective of the cards it has in its hands before they decide to reveal them to the world.

Let’s just all hope that it gives the green light to reveal the actual numbers soon.

Click past the jump to read more about the info leak on Suzuki’s website.

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Video: Suzuki Chronicles Development of GSX-RR Ahead of 2015 MotoGP Season

Video: Suzuki Chronicles Development of GSX-RR Ahead of 2015 MotoGP Season

Suzuki hasn’t been involved in MotoGP since 2011 so you can imagine the excitement and buzz surrounding the company’s announcement that it’s heading back to the grid for the 2015 MotoGP season. Like any true company that sees value in generating more publicity with its return to motor racing, Suzuki didn’t waste any time producing a new documentary that highlights the development of its new - and official - MotoGP racer, the GSX-RR.

The bike itself only tells part of Suzuki’s return to MotoGP story. The team made waves last season when it emerged as a wild card entry at Valencia, Spain, but the pomp and circumstance behind that testing cameo ended with a whimper when test rider Randy De Puniet was forced to retire due to technical problems. With a full offseason under its belt, it looks like Suzuki is now armed and ready to return to MotoGP with a bang.

The team’s prospects lie in its two race riders, Aleix Espargaro and Maverick Vinales, two young drivers that are slowly making waves in the motor racing scene. But the team’s fortunes don’t just rest on Espargaro and Vinales. Much has also been made of the maddening GSX-RR, which is currently in the middle of testing and development in time for its own maiden voyage in MotoGP. Suzuki’s decision to ditch its old V4 architecture in favor of using an inline-four engine on the GSX-RR has already paid dividends, and that in turn has drummed up enormous expectations for Suzuki, its riders, and its fancy new racing bike.

The question now is whether Suzuki has the chops to challenge two-time champion Marc Marquez and the Repsol Honda team for the title. Marquez is the golden boy of MotoGP these days so the task of unseating him is daunting, to say the least. But if the Suzuki GSX-RR is all it’s being promised to be, then we might be in for an exciting 2015 MotoGP season.

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2014 Suzuki GSX1250FA Z

2014 Suzuki GSX1250FA Z

The Suzuki GSX1250FAZ was designed with sportiness, comfort and agility in mind, so is packed with a wide range of features and technologies which help it deliver superior ride and handling abilities.

But apart from being fast and agile, the Suzuki GSX1250FAZ is also a looker. The sleek, dramatic style of its aerodynamic fairing is further enhanced by the contrasting wheel stripes and a blue/black three colour graphic scheme running from front to rear.

The motorcycle is propelled by a 4 stroke, 4 cylinder, liquid cooled, DOHC engine with a capacity of 1255 cc. The engine generates a maximum output of 72.00 kW (97.00hp) at 7500rpm and 108.00 Nm (80.00lb.Ft) of torque at 3700 rpm. All this power is kept under control by a 6-speed constant mesh transmission.

The Suzuki GSX1250FA Z is offered with a base price of €9.719.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX1250FAZ.

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2014 Suzuki GSX650F

2014 Suzuki GSX650F

The Suzuki GSX650F is a versatile motorcycle that can deal great with a wide range of activities. Its comfortable riding position and potent engine makes it great for long journeys, but on the other hand, its easy handling and decent efficiency helps it feel comfortable in the city too.

Power comes from a 4-stroke, 4-cylinder, liquid-cooled, DOHC engine with a displacement of 656 cc. The unit is mated to a 6-speed constant mesh transmission and generates a maximum output of 62.35 kW (84.00hp) at 10500 rpm and 61.50 Nm (45.00lb.Ft) of torque at 8900 rpm.

As far as suspensions are concerned, the Suzuki GSX650F if equipped with pre-load adjustable front and rear suspensions which were especially designed to enhance the motorcycle’s handling abilities.

Suzuki GSX650F is offered with a base price of €7.583 and the ABS version can be yours for €8.066.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX650F.

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2014 Suzuki GSX-R1000ZSE

2014 Suzuki GSX-R1000ZSE

The Suzuki GSX-R1000ZSE is a special version of the GSX-R1000ZSE and comes with a set of special style features that help it stand out from the crowd. The new motorcycle is available in only 100 units and is priced at €16.134.

The bike comes with a polished and chrome-plated frame and various anodized blue parts including machined and polished chrome rims with clear-coated blue spokes. The motorcycle also features a polished exhaust, a blue-coloured chain, an individually numbered serial plate and sporty graphics.

Power comes from a 999cc, 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, DOHC engine which generates 136.10 kW at 12000 rpm (182.50hp) and 116.70 Nm of torque at 10000 rpm (86.00lb.Ft). All this power is driven to the rear wheels by means of a six speed constant mesh transmission.

The motorcycle rides on bug 17 inch wheels which are wrapped in 120/70ZR17M/C (58W) front and 190/50ZR17M/C (73W) rear tubeless tires.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX-R1000ZSE.

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2014 Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura

2014 Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura

Suzuki built a range of unique black and red GSX-R750s models which are fitted with a tasty Yoshimura Accessory Pack. The special Yoshimura Performance pack includes a R11 performance exhaust, a bronze-alloy Yoshimura oil filler plug, a case saver kit, a steering stem nut and timing inspection cap, and black Yoshimura bar end weights and rear paddock stand locators.

The new Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura weighs 190 kg is powered by the stock 750 cc, 4 stroke, 4 cylinder, liquid cooled, DOHC engine which transfers its power to the ground by means of a six speed constant mesh transmission with slipper clutch.

The Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura rides on 17 inch rims shod in 120/70 ZR17M/C (58W) front and 180/55ZR17M/C (73W) rear tubeless tires.

The new Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura is available in only 100 units and is priced at €12.787.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX-R750 Yoshimura.

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2014 Suzuki GSX-R1000Z

2014 Suzuki GSX-R1000Z

Thanks to its racy DNA, the Suzuki GSX-R1000Z has always managed to stay ahead o the pack when it comes to high speed performances. This Japanese machine was created for the adrenaline-hungry riders, so it has all it needs to reward you with a thrilling riding experience every time you jump on its saddle.

The Suzuki GSX-R1000Z is propelled by a 999 cc, 4 stroke, liquid cooled, DOHC engine which is mated to a six speed constant mesh transmission with slipper clutch. In terms of power, the unit generates 136.10 kW (182.50 hp) at 12000 rpm and 116.70 Nm (86.00lb.Ft) of torque at 10000 rpm. For enhanced versatility, the motorcycle is also fitted with Suzuki’s drive mode selector which includes three separate performance settings that can suit different sections of the road or track.

The Suzuki GSX-R1000Z comes with a base price of €14.085.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX-R1000Z.

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2014 Suzuki GSX-R750 50th Anniversary Edition

2014 Suzuki GSX-R750 50th Anniversary Edition

The 2014 Suzuki GSX-R750 is now available in a special edition designed to mark 50 years since Suzuki has entered on the US market.

The new 2014 Suzuki GSX-R750 50th Anniversary Edition is available with a special Candy Daring Red / Glass Sparkle Black paint scheme and silver-colored front brake calipers with red “Brembo” lettering. You also get red pin-striping on wheels, a red-colored seat, a dark gold-anodized chain adjuster, and a red-anodized front fork adjuster.

The Suzuki GSX-R750 50th Anniversary Edition weighs only 190 kg and is built around a 4 stroke, 4 cylinder, liquid cooled, DOHC engine with a displacement of 750 cc. The unit is fed by a 4.5 gallons fuel tank and is mated to a 6 speed, constant mesh transmission.

The Suzuki GSX-R750 50th Anniversary Edition can be yours for no less than $ 12,499.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX-R750 50th Anniversary Edition.

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2014 Suzuki GSX-R1000

2014 Suzuki GSX-R1000

The 2014 Suzuki GSX-R1000 is one of the sportiest road legal motorcycles from the streets. It is powered by a 4 Stroke, 4 Cylinder, Liquid Cooled, DOHC engine with a displacement of 999 cc. The unit sends its power to the ground through a 6 speed, constant mesh transmission which delivers smooth and precise shifts.

A lightweight and compact twin-spar frame is made of five cast sections. The frame is combined with an arched swingarm made of three castings and one-piece die cast rear subframe.

As far as suspensions are concerned, the Suzuki GSX-R1000 is equipped with lightweight, fully adjustable 43 mm Showa Big Piston Front forks (BPF) and a modern rear shock absorber that features adjustable rebound damping, spring preload, and high-speed and low-speed compression damping.

The stopping power is handled by front disc and rear disc brakes.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2014 Suzuki GSX-R1000.

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2014 Suzuki GSX-R750

2014 Suzuki GSX-R750

The Suzuki GSX-R750 is a sporty motorcycle designed for those who love to mix speed with two wheels.

The motorcycle’s center piece is a 750 cc, four cylinder, liquid cooled, DOHC engine that comes with forged pistons, shot-peened conrods, chrome-nitride-coated upper compression and oil control rings, and pentagonal ventilation holes.

The engine is paired with a six-speed close-ratio transmission with “race-proven” back-torque-limiting clutch.

The bike’s backbone is represented by a lightweight and compact twin-spar aluminum cradle frame which is made of five cast sections and comes with a cast swingarm.

The 2014 Suzuki GSX-R750 rides on a lightweight 41 mm Showa Big Piston front-Fork (BPF) and a single Showa rear shock that features externally adjustable rebound and compression damping, as well as adjustable ride height.

You also get a pair of racy 120/70ZR17M/C (58W) front and 180/55ZR17M/C (73W) rear tubeless tires.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2014 Suzuki GSX-R750.

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2014 Suzuki GSX-R600

2014 Suzuki GSX-R600

The Suzuki GSX-R600 has already proven its value and in at the moment is considered one of the best models in its class.

At the heart of the motorcycle lies a 599 cc, four cylinder engine which breaths through a 4-into-1 stainless-steel exhaust system. The engine is kept in leash by a six-speed close-ratio transmission that features vertically staggered shafts to reduce overall engine length.

The motorcycle is built on a lightweight and compact twin-spar aluminum cradle frame which is made of five cast sections and features a cast swingarm.

Other features that are worthy of being mentioned include 3-way adjustable footpegs, an adjustable shift lever, a modern instrument cluster that features an analog tachometer with LCD readouts of the speedometer, odometer, dual trip meter, reserve trip meter, clock, coolant temperature/oil pressure indicator, S-DMS and gear position indicators.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2014 Suzuki GSX-R600.

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Suzuki GSX-R 1000 SE will be available in the US

Suzuki GSX-R 1000 SE will be available in the US

Suzuki has officially announced that its 50th anniversary 2014 GSX-R1000 SE will be available on the US market. The special edition GSX-R1000 is produced in a limited number of only 100 units and 50% of them will be sold in the US dealerships.

The motorcycle comes with a comprehensive list of special features which give it a pretty unique character. Among them you’ll find a polished chrome-plated frame, anodized blue accents and two-tone chrome rims with blue spokes. You also get a blue anodized outer fork tubes and a blue colored fuel cap.

More blue can be found on the clutch cover, rear shock spring, the generator cover and engine sprocket cover. Moreover, the drive chain, the headlight inner and seat are also blue coated.

To give the motorcycle an even more exclusivist character, Suzuki equipped it with a special speedometer panel design, a serial number plate and a special key fob.

For the moment Suzuki didn’t revealed the motorcycle’s price.

Hit the jump for more photos!

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Suzuki announces Limited Edition GSX-R750s packed with Yoshimura parts

Suzuki announces Limited Edition GSX-R750s packed with Yoshimura parts

Yoshimura is considered by many riders a leader when it comes to motorcycle tuning. This is the reason why, Suzuki choose to work with them and announced a range of limited editions of its black GSX-R750 equipped with Yoshimura and genuine Suzuki accessories.

The Limited Edition GSX-R features a fairly distinctive style and is sure to turn heads every time it passes down the street. Each Yoshimura Limited Edition GSX-R is available with a high quality, custom painted Black/Grey color scheme.

The bikes are available in only 25 units and are fitted with performance exhausts, bronze alloys, Yoshimura oil filter plug, case saver kit, steering stem nut and timing inspection cap. You also get black Yoshimura bar end weights and rear paddock stand bobbins.

As far as genuine Suzuki accessories are concerned, the bikes are fitted with rear seat cover, a double bubble screen, tank protector and fuel cap trim.

The Limited Editions cost just £800 more than the standard models and their custom parts worth over £1200, so it sounds like a pretty good deal to us. Moreover, thanks to a special offer from Suzuki, you can have to bike to the same price as the stock model as Paul de Lusignan, Suzuki General Manager said“Add in our current £800 cash back offer, and the faster responders will ride a very special GSX-R750 away for the same price as a standard model.”

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2013 Suzuki GSX1250FA

2013 Suzuki GSX1250FA

Handsome, agile and fast the Suzuki GSX1250FA is a modern sport-tourer developed for those who love long travels and high speeds.

This Japanese beauty features a sporty design language with an aerodynamic faring, a compact windscreen and a sculpted fuel tank. As far as ergonomics are concerned, the Suzuki GSX1250FA features a spacious, adjustable seat that can accommodate two people and a modern handlebar paired with a racy instrument panel.

Power comes from a fuel injected 1255cc, 4-stroke, 4-cylinder, liquid-cooled, DOHC engine that rewards you with a strong, low down torque. The engine’s power is kept under control by a modern 6-speed constant mesh transmission.

The motorcycle weights 257 kg and rides on a set of lightweight wheels wrapped in 120/70 ZR17M/C (58W) front and 180/55 ZR17M/C (73W) rear tubeless tyres.

The Suzuki GSX1250FA can be yours for not less than £7,865.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX1250FA.

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2012 Suzuki GSX650F

2012 Suzuki GSX650F

The Suzuki GSX650F is one of the most capable models in its class and deals great with both city streets and race tracks. The new GSX650F is technically a low cost middleweight bike aimed at the novice raider or the economical commuter and offers a perfect mix between comfort and sportiness.

The Suzuki GSX650F is based on the European Bandit 650 naked model and is powered by an 656 cm inline-Four, liquid cooled engine mated on a six speed constant mesh transmission. The engine comes with Suzuki’s Dual Throttle Valve (SDTV) digital fuel injection system which enhances power delivery and linear response.

A modern instrument panel keeps you posted on various stats such as an analog tachometer, LCD speedometer, odometer, fuel gauge, clock , dual trip meters, reserve trip meter and gear position indicator as well as engine rpm indicator.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2012 Suzuki GSX650F.

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2012 Suzuki GSX-R750

2012 Suzuki GSX-R750

Suzuki’s GSX-R series hold a special place in the hearts of riders for being the kind of bike that offers sporty good looks with outstanding engine performance and crisp handling. It’s an ideal bike for any kind of activity, with a versatility that’s virtually unmatched in the industry.

The technical specs of the 2012 model remain largely the same, which can really be looked at in either a glass half-full or half-empty way depending on which side of the fence you’re on. While others might scoff at the relative lack of improvements from its predecessors, others continue to laud the GSX-R series for continuing its tradition as one of the best all-around bikes on the market.

For the latter, the GSX-R750’s 750cc, four-cylinder engine is the stuff where excitement is born. It comes with a race-proven oversquare bore/stroke ratio that provides exceptionally potent, high-revving performance while maximizing torque and improving throttle response, especially in the low-to-mid RPM range. The bike’s powetrain set-up also makes use of forged pistons, shot-peened conrods, a chrome-nitride-coated upper compression and oil control rings, and pentagonal ventilation holes for outstanding engine performance.

A far as handling is concerned, the Suzuki GSX-R750 was given a lightweight and compact twin-spar aluminum cradle frame that’s made out of five cast sections and features a cast swingarm. An electronically controlled steering damper provides lighter steering at lower speeds and more damping force at racetrack and highway speeds. On the flip side, handling also plays a huge part in ensuring that the GSX-R50 stays in the best possible shape, getting equipped with front brakes that feature fully floating 310mm discs and radial-mounted, four-piston Brembo monoblock calipers.

Find out more about the Suzuki GSX-R750 after the jump.

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2012 Suzuki GSX1250FA

2012 Suzuki GSX1250FA

Don’t be fooled by the long and confusing name of this bike; the 2012 Suzuki GSX1250FA is all business, all the time.

Featuring an impressive body design to go with a stomach-walloping engine and superior handling credentials, the GSX1250FA is a bonafide speed maven.

The design of the GSX1250FA looks sporty but it’s still comfortable to ride. The contoured seat found on the GSX1250FA is the picture of comfort with the seat height also lending itself to be adjusted up or down by 20mm, all by flipping over the mounting spacers between the seat and the frame seat rails. A comprehensive instrument cluster also comes with the sports bike, offering a variety of gauges, including a convenient gear-position indicator and shift light, oil pressure/coolant temperature indicator, fuel injection indicator, ABS indicator, and engine RPM indicator light.

Power isn’t lacking with the GSX1250FA, especially since it comes with a compact, liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, 1255cc, DOHC, wet sump engine that has a bore and stroke of 79.0 mm x 64.0 mm. The bike also has Suzuki’s own Dual Throttle Valve (SDTV) fuel injection with 36mm throttle bodies, bringing superb response feel, smooth power delivery, improved mileage and reduced emissions, which is especially crucial for a bike that packs this much meat. The engine is mated to a slick shifting six speed transmission that improves acceleration while reducing top gear RPM at highway speeds.

In terms of handling, the GSX1250FA comes with a classic tube-frame chassis 43mm-stanchion-tube front forks that offer 5.1" of travel. A single rear shock with 5.4" of travel is preload adjustable while fully floating 310mm dual-disc front brakes with four-piston calipers and a single 240mm rear disc brake with a single-piston caliper make up the bike’s Digital Antilock Brake System (ABS) for optimum braking performance.

Find out more about the Suzuki GSX1250FA after the jump.

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2012 Suzuki GSX-R600

2012 Suzuki GSX-R600

When you’re in the market for a bike that comes with a world-class racing pedigree, you can’t do a whole lot better than the Suzuki GSX-R600. As a bike that has blazed its way to the AMA Pro Daytona SportBike Championship and the overall AMA Pro SuperSport Championship, the GSX-R600 is truly in a class all its own.

Compact and powerful, the GSX-R600 is a clear demonstration of Suzuki’s highly-advanced and race-proven technology of the GSX-R line. The crown jewel of the bike is its 599cc, 4-cyclinder engine, that comes with a race-proven oversquare bore/stroke ratio engineered for an exceptional high-revving performance. It’s got shot-peened con rods, a chrome-nitride-coated upper compression and oil control rings, and pentagonal ventilation holes that ensure the bike has the kind of efficient performance befitting its name and stature in the industry. The GSX-R600 also has new camshaft profiles that feature an aggressive valve-lift curve and a 4-into-1 stainless-steel exhaust system with a titanium muffler, maximizing torque and improving throttle response, especially in the low-to-mid RPM range. The whole engine technology, particularly the Suzuki Dual Throtle Valve System, gives the rider free reign to enjoy the insanely powerful characteristics of the GSX-R600.

Handling is also a prime trait of the GSX-R600, thanks in large part to a race-developed, lightweight Showa Big Piston front-Fork that delivers superior feedback and consistent performance. Likewise, a single Showa rear shock features externally adjustable rebound and compression damping, along with adjustable ride height, making for a bike that truly has the whole package - and then some.

Find out more about the Suzuki GSX-R600 after the jump.

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2012 Suzuki GSX-R1000

2012 Suzuki GSX-R1000

For those that can’t handle the all-world capabilities of the Suzuki Hayabusa, you can always find solace in a bike like the Suzuki GSX-R1000. It’s not as powerful as the almighty Hayabusa, but it comes pretty darn close.

The 2012 GSX-R1000 was built with an eye towards designing a super bike that can make the competition wince. With the kind of history Suzuki has with these machines, it wasn’t all that surprising that they’ve built a bike its customers will be very proud of.

Not only does the GSX-R1000 come with a new style and bodywork, but the bike also gets the benefit of a new chassis and suspension set-up that can support bikers during their high-speed excursions out on the the track.

Among the aesthetic features that have been built into the GSX-R1000 include a new high-grip leather seat that features outstanding holding properties, providing the rider with a greater sense of stability when accelerating. New front and rear tires have also been fitted with improved tread patterns and the front tire is 200 grams lighter, contributing to lower unsprung weight and sharper handling.

At the heart of the GSX-R1000 is a 999cc four-cyclinder engine that has been modified to deliver the kind of scintillating acceleration that few other top-end performance bikes are capable of replicating. The engine works hand-in-hand with a back torque-limiting clutch that incorporates the Suzuki Clutch Assist System (SCAS) for light clutch pull and optimum clutch performance, resulting in smoother downshifting, and allows the rider to take full advantage of engine output during deceleration. The GSX-R1000 also has a new 4-2-1 exhaust system that’s significantly lighter than its predecessor, contributing to improved agility and handling of a bike whose power output is no laughing matter.

Find out more about the Suzuki GSX-R1000 after the jump.

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Suzuki GSX-R1000 - fastest road racing Superbike on the planet

Suzuki GSX-R1000 - fastest road racing Superbike on the planet

Suzuki’s GSX-R1000 became the fastest road racing Superbike on the planet earlier this month, as Relentless Suzuki by TAS racer, Bruce Anstey, recorded an astonishing 133.977mph average lap speed in the final race of the Ulster Grand Prix.

Riding in the prestigious event that uses the closed-off roads around Dundrod in Northern Ireland, Anstey bravely piloted the GSX-R1000 around the 7.4 mile circuit, smashing the previous record in front of a 30,000 strong-crowd.

Talking about his amazing lap record, London-based Kiwi, Bruce, said,"I knew the Relentless Suzuki by TAS GSX-R1000 was fast, but even I didn’t think we could go this quickly. We finished second in the opening race which was a little disappointing, so I got my head down in the final Superbike race and pushed as hard as I could. It was a close battle, but we took the win and proved that the GSX-R1000 is the fastest, which is especially nice during the 25th anniversary year".

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Mulholland and GSX-Rs [w/video]

Mulholland and GSX-Rs [w/video]

Mulholland a.k.a. The Snake seems to have a bad relation with motorcycles in general and GSX-Rs in particular as the highway’s often challenging curves happen to throw off the seats even the most experienced riders. We’re not sure if that’s the case with the next two examples that we came across, but they’re enough to make a point. The first rider lowsides and the second highsides, both while riding a Suzuki GSX-R on the same section of The Snake. Hit the jump to see the videos.

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Video: how the Suzuki GSX-R1000 superbike is born

Video: how the Suzuki GSX-R1000 superbike is born

A couple of months ago we posted an official Suzuki video showing how their 1993 GSX-R750 came to life. While that was very interesting despite the age, imagine how exciting it is to see how today’s Suzuki GSX-R1000 superbike is born at the Japanese plant in Hamamatsu. The attached video takes us through the most important fabrication processes, allowing riders to understand just how brilliantly their bikes are being put together.

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2010 Suzuki GSX650F ABS

2010 Suzuki GSX650F ABS

Suzuki has presented the 2010 GSX650F ABS, a sporty and now safer road bike addressed to those just turning to motorcycling and in search of a versatile middleweight machine that will prove both economical and practical. The bike is nothing more than a Bandit 650 wrapped in a fairing, but its GSX-R looks combined with the implicit user-friendliness turn it into an almost unbeatable do-it-all sportbike.

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2010 Suzuki GSX-R600

2010 Suzuki GSX-R600

Suzuki carries on producing the GSX-R600 with little design tweaks and presents a new color range aimed at upgrading the bike’s exterior. This is the main 2010 strategy for the middleweight class (and not only) as manufacturers reunite with their drawing boards for future generation models.

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2010 Suzuki GSX-R 750

2010 Suzuki GSX-R 750

By presenting the 2010 GSX-R 750, Suzuki gives a big slap on the necks of those who expected them to stop making this superbike. A motorcycle that was successfully produced for decades and has even inspired the introduction of the GSX-R 600 back in the early 1990s carries on as a unique presence on a continuously growing market, but, apparently, one in which competitors can’t see the effectiveness of the 750cc sport bike.

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