Suzuki Motorcycles

Suzuki grabbed its place in the motorcycle world by pushing the envelope. From progressive two-strokers in the ’60s to the stunning Katana in 1981, but with none more than the GSX R 750 in 1985, the first true street-legal race bike. Today, Suzukis aren’t groundbreakers, but evolved, reliable and affordable motorcycles. check out our Buyer’s guide for more information about Suzuki models

Top Speed Guide To The 2019 Suzuki Cycles Lineup

Top Speed Guide To The 2019 Suzuki Cycles Lineup

Here’s the 2019 Suzuki Motorcycles Explained

One of the Big Four motorcycle manufacturers, Suzuki is a powerhouse in on-road and off-road motorcycles as well as in motorcycle racing. Offering up a full line of sportbikes, heritage rides, and scooters, Suzuki holds a commanding share of the North American market.

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Suzuki motorcycle history

Suzuki motorcycle history

quick introduction to Suzuki motorcycle legacy

A household name in the motorcycle world today, Suzuki began as a loom factory in 1909. The founder, Michio Suzuki, decided to push into the growing automotive market. On the eve of the Second World War, in 1937, the company began producing its own budget car. That same year Japan invaded China and fought until its catastrophic defeat eight years later.

As the devastated country began rebuilding, Suzuki wanted to produce a cheap vehicle available to many for simple transportation. It did it with a self-powered bicycle, named the Diamond Free, in 1952. The first real Suzuki motorcycle came two years later, with the 90-cc four-stroke Colleda CO. Exports to the United States and Europe began in the 1960s, propelling Suzuki to a huge international motorcycle brand, also making scooters, ATVs and cars.

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2017 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S1000F

2017 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S1000F

The GSX-S1000F has a GSX-R-derived engine for Gixxer thrills in a comfortable ride

Suzuki rolls its GSX-S1000F into MY2020 with a new Glass Sparkle Black colorway that is sure to turn heads, day or night. A GSX-R-based engine design delivers the goods with advanced rider-aid technology along with adjustable suspension and ABS protection to finish the package. This model makes an “all-new” return in 2020 after a hiatus last year.

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TopSpeed's 2020 Suzuki Buying Guide

TopSpeed’s 2020 Suzuki Buying Guide

Check out Suzuki’s 2020 lineup

Suzuki spices things up for 2020 with a veritable buffet of minor aesthetic tweaks and other improvements on the menu

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2015 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-R750

2015 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-R750

The GSX-R750 is certainly not for the faint of heart

Suzuki keeps improving and expanding its signature supersport series, and the 2020 GSX-R750 carries the torch first ignited by the original Gixxer 750 all the way back in 1984. Granted, the “late model” Gixxers dropped the steel frame in favor of aluminum, and the air-cooled engine has been replaced with a jacketed mill, but the overall mission for the bike remains the same: to provide the general public with the most race-ready production bike available for legal use on the street. Of course, the rest of the market has caught up to Suzuki and the supersport segment is flooded with similarly capable rides — and a good number of more capable sleds — though the most race-tastic of them are far more expensive than the $12K-ish GSX-R750.

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2015 - 2019 Suzuki GSX-R600

2015 - 2019 Suzuki GSX-R600

The GSX-R600: It’s a Gixxer... ’nuff said

Suzuki continues the Gixxer family legacy into the 2020 model year with the GSX-R600 powered by a 599 cc engine and includes all the sporty handling that is expected in this prestigious line.

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2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

2019 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

Suzuki put a new fuel-injected engine in the GSX-S750 for an even more thrilling ride

Suzuki shuffled its “standard” selections ahead of MY2019 with a new powerplant based on the proven Gixxer mill. The 2020 GSX-S750 comes sans ABS, but the lineup includes an ABS model in the custom-flavored, “Z” blackout package that the factory hopes will cover all the bases in the mid-size naked-sport sector. Additionally, it rocks a robust electronics suite with engine-control features as well as safety-related goodies. Power and agility (read: fun) come together with Spartan looks and a modicum of comfort on these bikes.

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2017 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

2017 - 2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

GSX-R1000R: Fiery-Eyed Pegdraggers Rejoice!

Coming off a fresh update in 2017, Suzuki carries its GSX-R1000R into MY2020 with little else in the way of changes. The next-gen “Gixxer” 1000 brought an all-new 999.8 cc powerplant to the table with a claimed 199 horsepower at the shaft and a whole passel of electronic goodies to help manage all those ponies. Traction control, lean-sensitive ABS, launch control and more, Suzuki’s flagship literbike comes equipped with overlapping safety nets to help keep us mortal, non-professional riders dirty-side down as we explore our electronically augmented performance envelope. MotoGP tech influences the design to give the rider a little taste of track-day performance, or at the very least, ’performance light.’

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2018 - 2020 Suzuki GSX250R

2018 - 2020 Suzuki GSX250R

The GSX250R is the mighty little sportbike that could

All-new in 2018, the GSX250R from [Suzuki-mot291] is set to enter the race to the bottom. Not the bottom of the stack, but the bottom of the displacement range with its 248 cc fuel-injected, liquid-cooled, parallel-twin engine. Suzuki jumps on the go-small-or-go-home bandwagon with a sportbike carrying all the genetic markers of the Katana family, and exactly what you would expect from one of the Big Four.

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2015 - 2020 Suzuki DR200S

2015 - 2020 Suzuki DR200S

It’s a tried-and-true dual sport

Suzuki brings dual-sport capabilities to the entry-level sector with its DR200S. A heavy emphasis on off-road performance defines the overall look; and a 199 cc engine drives it over hill and dale, as well as down the road with all the appropriate lighting for safety and legalities. The end result is a functional, if plain, bike that provides a stable ride and moderate power with a humble overall bearing. A carry-over for the last few years, it hasn’t changed much, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

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2015 - 2019 Suzuki DR650S

2015 - 2019 Suzuki DR650S

The DR650S could be the “I-wanna-have-fun” bike you’ll hang on to

It’s not the most attractive bike in the dual sport stable, though it’s small and scrappy with a 644 cc engine and so much fun to ride. With a glance at the DR650S from Suzuki you might just dismiss it as an enduro bike. That would be doing it an injustice. It’s really a basic adventure bike that will get you off the pavement and into the woods with perhaps more gumption than a real adventure bike. Priced affordably, it isn’t tragic to drop it as it would be otherwise and it is lightweight enough that you can pick it up and keep going.

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2016 - 2020 Suzuki DR-Z400S / DR-Z400SM

2016 - 2020 Suzuki DR-Z400S / DR-Z400SM

Suzuki Still Has Carbureted Dual Sports

Pitting the fuel-injection fans against the carburetor fans, we score a point for the latter with the DR-Z400S and DR-Z400SM from Suzuki. Fuel injection hasn’t yet made an appearance in Suzuki’s dual-sport lineup, which was a good thing or a bad thing, depending on which side of the fence you’re on. For 2020, the DR-Z siblings haven’t yet been touched by the FI update. Sharing the same engine as the 500EXC from KTM, the DR-Zs come on a different chassis with progressive-link rear suspension. The “SM” — the SuperMoto of the family — and the “S” feature a six-liter air box with quick-release fasteners trouble-free access to the air filter and special low profile mirrors that rotate hoping to avoid damage, both are pluses when you’re playing in the dirt.

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Suzuki GSX-R model lineup guide

Suzuki GSX-R model lineup guide

Which GSX-R should you buy?

Suzuki caused a tectonic shift in the motorcycle industry with the GSX-R750 and 35 years later the name still a sure-bet go-to for riders with racing aspirations. Any of the Gixxers – the 1000, 750 and 600 – are bikes capable for fast times on the track right out of the store.

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2017 - 2019 Suzuki VanVan 200

2017 - 2019 Suzuki VanVan 200

Perfect anywhere the ground is loose and four wheels just won’t do

The VanVan from Suzuki comes equipped with a 200 cc engine, which is an upgrade from the old 125 cc model still available in other markets. In typical scrambler fashion, the VanVan 200 is the dirt-road/gravel-road/loose-dirt ride that qualifies it as a “sandbike” because of the fat rear tire to keep you going. Better than an ATV in some situations, the Vanvan is lightweight and capable, perfect for a jaunt around the ranch, a quick run up the trapline or an excursion on the beach, anywhere the ground is loose and four wheels just won’t do.

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Top Speed Top Six Adventure motorcycles to consider for beginners

Top Speed Top Six Adventure motorcycles to consider for beginners

Machines built for the love of adventure for the newbies into motorcycling

If carving up terrains was your idea of motorcycling, adventure motorcycles are a bipartisan look at how to tackle paved roads and dirt. With long travel suspensions, and a higher riding position, these machines can take your motorcycling learning curve through a multitude of terrains, teaching you some of the biggest lessons travelling on two wheels can.

With having a lot to carry around to fight a multitude of terrains, they are usually an expensive affair (easily 14 grand or more for the latest top-spec models). Luckily, manufacturers have been recognizing this and have been tweaking things around to offer more affordable options to give not so fortunate riders and the young guns to experience the thrill of finding our way through the unknown on two-wheels.

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Top Speed Top Six Cruisers to consider for beginners

Top Speed Top Six Cruisers to consider for beginners

For the newbies who love the laid-back reclined riding styles that make covering vast expanses of asphalts a pleasure

Being the closest thing to flying without leaving the ground, Cruisers have been the incarnation of the ‘30s to ‘60s American lifestyles. And if this is the way you want to get into the world of motorcycles, I guess you have taken the first step in the right direction. Feeling the wind in the air, the smell of cut grass on the countryside, the constant changes in the temperatures, cruisers can show you all these feelings and more at the twist of the throttle.

These six machines are our top pick come with plenty of low-end torque, forward set footpegs, and a laid-back reclined riding position defining any modern-day cruisers. All of this without breaking our banks.

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Top Speed Top Six Sportsbikes to consider for beginners

Top Speed Top Six Sportsbikes to consider for beginners

If you want to look fast while you still learn the tricks, these machines could be your pick

Starting with a sportsbike as your first might seem off-putting. Still, with technology and the manufacturers’ ability to make bikes as user-friendly as possible, it might just be the right entry for your motorcycling adventures. They are sleek with aerodynamic bodywork, top-spec suspension and braking setups, and ride with aggressive riding positions.

There are plenty of affordable bikes out there for every skill level matching the size of small wallets. These are our recommendations for young riders itching to feel the wind in the most stylish and flashy manner. And occasionally maybe want to drop a knee on a racetrack or zoom around your local canyon road.

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A bit of Suzuki History

One of Japan’s Big Four motorcycle makers, Suzuki began in 1909 as a weaving machine factory in Hamamatsu. Seeking to diversify, founder Michio Suzuki began producing cars in 1937 and added motorcycles 15 years later.

The motorcycle factory established itself as a sport-oriented groundbreaker, from the 1962 T20 Hustler, “the fastest 250 cc bike in the world” with a then-rare six-speed transmission, to the stunning three-cylinder, two-stroke power bike GT760 in 1971 and then the Katana family, with the 1100 flagship in the early 1980s. But few motorcycles changed the industry as much as did Suzuki’s GXR-R750 in 1985, followed by the 1100cc big model. The world’s first superbike, built for the racetrack out of production, spawned of a whole new class of high-end, super light and super fast motorcycles.

Suzuki was the first Japanese maker to branch into the chopper/cruiser division, appealing to the Harley Davidson-dominated U.S. market with the v-twin Intruder 750, also in 1985.

In 1996, Suzuki went after the Italian Ducati with its own 90-degree V-twin, the TL1000. While the model did not last long, the modified engine eventually went to the much more successful dual-sport model, the DL1000 V-Strom, from 2002. The downsized 650 cc V-2 engine powers the budget street model SV650 since 1999 and the small V-Strom, the wee, since 1999 and 2004, respectively.

The factory also produced off-road bikes, notably with the DR-BIG, a 779 cc single-cylinder – to date the largest production single in the world – as one of the early adventure/touring bikes which became the dominant segment on the big motorcycles market around a decade later.

F.A.Q.

Who founded Suzuki?

Michio Suzuki (1887 – 1982) launched a loom factory in 1909 in Hamamatsu, Japan. The factory began making cars in 1937 and motorcycles in 1954.

Where are Suzuki motorcycles made?

Suzuki motorcycles are made in Hamamatsu, Japan.

What is the most iconic Suzuki motorcycle?

Arguably, the early 1980s Katana, the mid 1985s GSX-Rs or the Hayabusa. Among particular models, the two-stroke Grand Prix replica from the mid-1980s, the RG500 Gamma, and the V-2 superbike TL1000 R from the mid-1990s count among the most-sought after collectors’ models. Both are rare.

What is the fastest-ever Suzuki motorcycle?

The first Hayabusa, in 1999. It reached 194 MPH. Later Hayabusa models were slightly slower, under a manufacturers’ agreement limiting the speed to 186 MPH. The manufacturers feared that superbikes may become banned because of their speed war.

What is the best-ever Suzuki motorcycle?

The GXR-R 750 was the biggest game-changer. Arguably, the Katana was the most beautiful. Hayabusa was the fastest. The modest SV650 and V-Strom 650 have remained in the program and are sold longer 21 and 17 years, respectively.

Does Suzuki only make motorcycles?

No, it also produces small, mid-sized and maxi scooters, as well as ATVs. Suzuki is also a major car maker.