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New Suzuki Trademarks Point to Return of Katana and Gamma Names

New Suzuki Trademarks Point to Return of Katana and Gamma Names

Could there be a storm brewing deep inside Hamamatsu? That appears to be the case after Suzuki has began the process of re-registering the Katana and Gamma names, adding fire to the increasing speculation that the Japanese bikemaker is preparing to bring back the two motorcycle families into the fold.

Here’s what we know so far: Suzuki registered the Katana name and logo with both the US and European trademark offices. Meanwhile, the Gamma logo was re-registered in the European trademark office. That’s about it.

Granted, it’s not much to go by, but if you think about it, Suzuki wouldn’t take these steps and then just live these new trademarks idle, sitting in the garage collecting some dust. There’s a plan behind these new registrations, even if the specifics at this point are still murky at best.

The Katana is the intriguing name because it could add fuel to the likelihood of the turbocharged Recursion Concept finding its way to production in the near future.

Remember, the Katana used to be a a line of performance-oriented bikes that was eventually absorbed into the sport-touring market. The return of the Katana name and the admittedly awesome Katana logo could mean that Suzuki’s preparing to dust off the old performance family and bring it back to prominence.

As for the Gamma, it’s possible that Suzuki’s bringing back that name, albeit in a different configuration from its previous incarnation. Short-lived as it was, the Suzuki RG500 Gamma had its fair share of admirers as a 500cc two-stroke superbike. This time around, there’s a sliver of chance that Suzuki could opt to take four-stroke route for the Gamma.

That could be the reason why Suzuki left out the Gamma in the US trademarks office since on-road two-stroke bikes are frowned upon in these roads.

Whatever Suzuki’s plans are for re-registering these two names, it’s clear that the company’s planning for some kind of model uprising in the future.

Click past the jump to read more about Suzuki’s plans.

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Suzuki Recursion Concept Headed to Production?

The Suzuki Recursion Concept turned a lot of heads at the 2013 Tokyo Motor Show for being the wonder bike that offered incredible power packed in a nimble, middleweight machine. We haven’t heard a lot about the Recursion Concept since, but now, Japanese magazine Young Machine is reporting that Suzuki is planning to build a production version of the Recursion Concept.

This is obviously welcome news to everyone that has clamored Suzuki to take such a step, even if it’s probably best to take the report with a grain of salt until Suzuki officially confirms it. But even without any comments from Suzuki, a planned production run of the Recursion Concept falls right in line with the belief that a lot of bikemakers are all set to begin hunkering down and producing more forced induction models in a bid to attract more buyers who prefer smaller but more powerful machines. It’s not like forced induction is still a foreign concept among motorcycles, especially now that car companies are already taking this route.

So by that rationale, a production model of the Recursion Concept sounds like a fantastic idea. The concept’s biggest selling point was its ability to offer a 588cc turbo-charged engine built inside a lightweight frame, essentially giving customers a more powerful and better handling sportsbike that could give the Kawasaki Ninja a serious run for its money.

And besides, Suzuki’s status in the motorcycle world needs a jolt in the arm. That jolt could come in the form of the Suzuki Recursion.

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Suzuki Gladius NaSty concept brings a supermoto feel

Suzuki Gladius NaSty concept brings a supermoto feel

For the NaSty concept, GPDesign has taken Suzuki’s entry-level naked bike, the Gladius, and made their best in turning it into a supermoto version. Focusing on technology and innovation to enhance the design and emphasize safety, the NaSty concept also has the purpose of keeping riders interested in the bike as it is claimed to be very versatile.

Among its most important features we find the 2.75-inch taller seat. The sporty looking unit is actually made of alcantara leather and it is water resistant, so quality was definitely taken into consideration. Also, they’ve added supermoto handlebars with handguards and everything. These lasts together with the tall front fender and front plastic body parts do make the Gladius in its NaSty form even easier to love.

Suzuki Gladius NaSty concept

At the back, an aftermarket exhaust and a new plate holder do the trick. What’s best about this concept is that it features fluorescent paint on the rims, tank and handguards, which makes the thing more visible at night and implicit much safer to ride. Good idea!

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Suzuki S40 café racer by Ryca Motors

Suzuki S40 café racer by Ryca Motors

When former NASA engineer Casey Stevenson was in the market for a light, economical and enjoyable motorcycle to cruise the LA streets on, he came to find that there are no such bikes being currently made. So he considered turning a Suzuki S40 into a café racer and ended up creating the Ryca CS-1, a 650cc, air-cooled, single cylinder cafe racer prototype. Later, he thought at a way of turning his idea into money, so he founded Ryca Motors, the shop where they turn any Suzuki S40 or Savage model into veritable café racers.

Suzuki S40 café racer

The production version of the Ryca CS-1 features the middleweight single-cylinder engine and a five-speed tranny and returns 60 mpg. Café racer goodies such as the custom low profile tank with integrated keyswitch / indicator panel, fiberglass seat and side covers as well as rearsets with custom mounting bracket and hardware and aluminum clip-ons give the bike its unique look.

Because the original bike’s engine and chassis don’t require significant changes, Ryca Motors also offers a custom parts and accessories kit that owners can buy and install themselves. Click past the break to read about the four different possibilities of getting yourself on one of these and also what the kit includes.

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 Suzuki GT550 café racer looks the best

Suzuki GT550 café racer looks the best

The café racer style may not have started on Japanese bikes, but it does help turn some of these into absolutely gorgeous machines. For example, this 1975 Suzuki GT550 (I know, it looks brand new) is probably the coolest café racer approach on a classic Japanese bike.

Thomas Leeming from Montana recently finished building it and he doesn’t forget to mention some of the changes he has done: "pipes by Omar’s. Electronic ignition. Battery, oil tank and electrics are hidden under the seat cowl."

What we like the most about the Suzuki GT550 cafe racer is the racy and yet classy look given by the bike’s stance and the multitude of shiny bits and parts. More pics after the jump.

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Great Britain gets Suzuki GSX-R600 special edition

Great Britain gets Suzuki GSX-R600 special edition

In 2010, Suzuki celebrates 25 years of successfully producing the GSX-R series, so they have released a special edition GSX-R600 featuring a paintjob that is reminiscent of the 1999 factory World Superbike racing bike, but also a Yoshimura exhaust, top yoke plaque and an authenticity certificate.

Only 25 anniversary models will be made and they are destined for the Britain market at the price of £8799 ($13,283). The bike will be first seen in public at the Carole Nash MCN Scottish motorcycle show this weekend and reservations start on the 1st of April. For more information about the Suzuki GSX-R special edition and reservation process go to www.imgsx-r.com.

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Unveiled: 2010 Rizla Suzuki GSV-R

Unveiled: 2010 Rizla Suzuki GSV-R

Rizla Suzuki has today released the first pics of the 2010 GSV-R, the 800cc MotoGP racing bike that will be ridden by Loris Capirossi and Alvaro Bautista in the upcoming season. The bike will again distinguish thanks to the dominating Blue with RIZLA written on each side.

Althought the bike doesn’t look much different from the 2009 model, the team claims their fourth generation model is better from all points of view: acceleration, aerodynamics, chassis and electronics. Still the V4 copes with engine restrictions implemented into this year’s championship, meaning Suzuki will only supply 6 engines for all 18 races.

While it is nice seeing that reliability is also taken into concern, what happened to “the best race engine is the one that ceases right after passing the finish line”?

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Suzuki Gladius streetfighter by Oberdan Bezzi

Suzuki Gladius streetfighter by Oberdan Bezzi

Suzuki introduced their all-new middleweight Gladius in 2009 and didn’t change it in any way for this year, but here comes a rendering showing a quite possible way to turn the funky Suzuki naked bike into a presence much strongly felt wherever ridden. The design was done by Oberdan Bezzi, Italy’s most renown motorcycle designer, and it aims towards a more aggressive look.

If we were daring, which we can become, we would say this concept could easily pass as a streetfighter, but as much as we look at it, we cannot erase the fairly dull image of the model currently being produced. That’s the sad part because with his sketch, Obiboi is trying to drift the Suzuki Gladius away from its original look and make it worthy of an “S” completing the name.

Although the designer doesn’t mention anything about a possible engine upgrade, we think this is a rather simple way of refreshing the Gladius look and increase figures on the sales charts in years to come.

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First look: 2010 Suzuki B-King gets attractive new color scheme

First look: 2010 Suzuki B-King gets attractive new color scheme

The Suzuki B-King was introduced a few years ago on a market apparently eager for a naked version of the notorious Hayabusa, but the sales charts have disappointed Suzuki and the project represents too much of an investment for them to simply discontinue it, so the solution is to make it more attractive for potential buyers. That goal appears to be accomplished on the 2010 model year, which gets a nice blue/white color scheme and 1970s style gold rims.

This is the only bit of information about the 1300cc Japanese naked, but the bike appears to be unchanged apart from that. Sure, you all could have lived with shorter silencers, but Suzuki is keen on the rocket-launcher ones, so that’s what you’ll keep on getting.

It is not yet confirmed if the flashy color scheme will be available for bikes shipped over to the US and the price will be announced.

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DJ Sport Suzuki B-King sidecar

DJ Sport Suzuki B-King sidecar

The Hayabusa-derived Suzuki B-King was never meant to be practical and the pillions always complained about back pain during longer journeys, so it is good to know that someone thought at somehow solving these two problems and creating more others. A French company called D.J. Construction has created the DJ Sport B-King sidecar, which is nothing more than a detuned B-King (106-horsepower) with a modified front end (that yellow shock is actually an expensive Öhlins part) and a rather aerodynamic and yet comfortable rig.

The friends at MotoMag in France actually got the chance to ride this strange combination and their impressions are not bad at all, although they do mention the DJ Sport Suzuki B-King sidecar enjoys turning right more than it does turning left. Now why would that be…?

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Kawazuki by Icon

Kawazuki by Icon

Apart from providing motorcycle gear for speed junkies, Icon also like to get their hands dirty from time to time while customizing, obviously, Japanese motorcycles. One of their latest creations is actually called the Kawazuki, originally a 1979 Kawasaki KZ1000 with an ordinary destiny, but which ended up with a modified frame (mounts for rearsets included), a Suzuki SV1000 monoshock and front end as well as with a ’92 GSX-R750 swingarm and rear wheel.

The original engine was fitted with a 1075cc Wiseco big bore kit so that this classic would keep up with modern bikes, but it is a pleasure just to look at it.

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Hamamatsu Hyaku B-King limited edition by Suzuki Italia

Hamamatsu Hyaku B-King limited edition by Suzuki Italia

Suzuki Italia has teamed up with “GP Design” to create a limited edition version of the B-King. Called Hyaku B-King, the bike arrives to celebrate 100 years of existence and the name itself is suggestive as Hyaku stands for “hundred” in Japanese.

The idea was to actually create a special kit for the Hamamatsu model, composed from: silencer, matte black fairings, redesigned headlight and taillight. This means that current owners of the specified model can buy the Hyaku kit separately and enhance the already aggressive look of their bikes.

The Hamamatsu Hyaku B-King costs €14,500 ($21,882), but the manufacturer says it’s worth every cent. And who are we to disagree?

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