Suzuki Motorcycles reviews

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2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard M90

2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard M90

The Old New-School Boulevard Bruiser

Around the turn of the century, the cruiser style had evolved into fat tires, lots of chrome, wide bodies and pegs out front to give you that almost slouched, relaxed riding posture. Since then, cruiser style has cycled back to "old school." They’ve lost some weight and slimmed down, creating a low and lean version of a sport look. If your vision of what a cruiser should be is stuck in the fat tires and wide body — think of it as "old new-school" — Suzuki has the Boulevard M90 that’s right up your alley.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Boulevard M90.

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2016 - 2018 Suzuki Hayabusa

2016 - 2018 Suzuki Hayabusa

It’ll Scare The Crap Out Of Someone Who Loves You

It’s a Hayabusa. Is there really anything more to be said? It’s Suzuki’s Gixxer 1,340 cc monster speed machine back again for 2018. The ’Busa is one of the biggest sportbikes out there, so yeah, big and heavy; you don’t want to go slow very long. Once at speed, the bike is in its element. Stupidfast. Look it up in the dictionary and you’ll find a picture of a Hayabusa.

(Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Hayabusa.}

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2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard M109R B.O.S.S.

2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard M109R B.O.S.S.

The Epitome Of The ’Boulevard Bruiser’

Introduced as the bad-ass brother of Suzuki’s M109R, the Boulevard M109R B.O.S.S. carries forward into 2018 with its 109 cubic inch (1,783 cc) engine. Yeah, B.O.S.S. stands for ’Blacked Out Special Suzuki’, but I’m gonna call it ’Blacked Out Super Sweet’. It might not be the fastest cruiser on the market, but it is definitely a power-cruiser and it really wants to go when you let out the clutch.

Continue reading for my review on the Suzuki Boulevard M109R B.O.S.S.

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2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard C50 / Boulevard C50T

2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard C50 / Boulevard C50T

Middleweight Cruiser and Tourer

Suzuki unveiled its Boulevard C50 back in 2005 after renaming its “Volusia” bike of prior model years. The C50 and C50Ts carry straight into 2018, with a mid-displacement engine to serve as Suzuki’s mid-size cruiser and weekend tour bike. Smooth acceleration and comfortable seating combine with laced wheels and classic styling to keep the C50s on the list of middleweight contenders in the two-wheeled market.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Boulevard C50 and Boulevard C50T.

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2016 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard C90 B.O.S.S.

2016 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard C90 B.O.S.S.

Blacked-Out Boulevard Bruiser

There can be no doubt that the American cruiser market is heating up, and Suzuki looks to capitalize on that class popularity with its Boulevard C90 Blacked-Out Special Suzuki (B.O.S.S.) model. Powered by a 1,462 cc V-twin engine, the C90 B.O.S.S. lives up to its name with black-out styling and agile handling for that sinister boulevard-bruiser look and feel. Let’s take a look at what Suzuki is doing to maintain a foothold with buyers in the U.S. cruiser market.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Boulevard C90 B.O.S.S.

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2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard C90T

2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard C90T

Your Basic No Frills Tourer

Cruisers and touring bikes go hand in hand for that relaxed, comfortable ride you get. The Boulevard C90T from Suzuki — absent for 2014, but back in 2015 - is the touring version of the C90 that was dropped after the 2013 model year, though the C90 B.O.S.S. is still going strong in 2018. Leather-look — not real leather, just leather textured — hard saddlebags and an ample windscreen give the C90T that "I’m ready for the road" look along with a 1,462 cc engine and five-speed transmixer. Is it ready for the road? I wanted to see if, in fact, the "T" in C90T really does mean "touring."

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Boulevard C90T.

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2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard M50

2015 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard M50

A Muscle-Bike Look With A Tame Attitude

Suzuki’s Boulevard M50 cruiser carries into 2018 with more of that custom American style that made it popular ever since it evolved from the old Intruder. Low-slung good looks join the 42-horsepower, 805 cc V-twin and faux-rigid frame for a package that’s meant to drive the imaginations of entry-level riders who might appreciate the style but be uninterested in worshiping at the Altar of Harley. Moderate power and a low seat height makes it appropriate for the young and/or inexperienced, and the lack of excessive electronic fandanglery makes it relatively easy to service and maintain, which is always a bonus for the uninitiated. Join me while I check out the rest of the details on Suzuki’s mid-size cruiser.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Boulevard M50.

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2017 - 2018 Suzuki SV650 ABS

2017 - 2018 Suzuki SV650 ABS

The New Look Of The UJM Standard

Suzuki continued with the evolution of the SV650 line last year with the all-new-for-2017 SV650. Built on the success of the original SV650 that covered 1999 through 2008, and its offspring, the SFV650 “Gladius,” this new ride carries the SV DNA into a new generation. This new ride replaces the Gladius, so SFV fans, if you are looking for anything beyond a 2015 model, abandon hope. Join me while I take a look at what lessons Suzuki has learned over the last 17 years or so of working on this family.

Continue reading for my look at the Suzuki SV650.

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2018 Suzuki Burgman 400

2018 Suzuki Burgman 400

The 400 Is Back And Better Than Ever

The Burgman range has served as Suzuki’s modern-metro luxury scooter lineup for a football minute now. The Burgman stable used to have a “400” within the range, but the factory pulled it out of the North American market for the ’17 model year. Back in the lineup for 2018, the Burgman 400 emerges as an all-new, third-generation model available for the NA market. A new powerplant delivers over 30 horsepower, and it comes tucked away under a revised body.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Burgman 400.

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2016 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard S40

2016 - 2018 Suzuki Boulevard S40

If You Wait Long Enough, Everything Comes Back In Style

Suzuki pushes the venerable Boulevard S40 line into the 2018 model year with naught but a few extra touches to the paint. In fact, little has really changed with this ride since it came out in 1988 under the LS650 “Savage” moniker, and that honest simplicity is one of the main draws for this compact sled. Unfortunately, therein lies one of its biggest flaws as well. Air-cooled and carbureted, I imagine its low 652 cc displacement is the only reason it is able to meet emissions, and I fully expect tightening regulations to eventually strangle this line. At the very least, said laws may force it into the 21st century with fuel injection and a water jacket and radiator, but that’s speculation. Today, I’m going to delve into what we know to be true and take a look at the brushed-up S40 as it sits for MY18.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Boulevard S40.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

2018 Suzuki GSX-S750 / GSX-S750Z

Back For 2018 With A New Attitude

Suzuki buffs its GSX-S750 for the 2018 model year with a new style, 110-plus horsepower plant and revamped brakes. Its darker sibling, the “Z” variant, adds ABS to the stock equipment package along with its blackout panache. Electronic fandanglery abounds with traction control and an Idle-Speed Control along with a Low-RPM Assist feature to help deliver safe, controllable power even at low speeds. How does it all stack up? Well, I’m going to take a look at these two rides today, and my perspective is that these are important models in a market-significant displacement bracket, and they have some pretty big shoes to fill. Let’s see how they measure up.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S750 and GSX-S750Z.

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2016 - 2017 Suzuki Burgman

2016 - 2017 Suzuki Burgman

A Grownup Version Of A Scooter

Largely carry-overs from previous years, the Burgmans in Suzuki’s dwindling 2017 lineup — called Skywave in Japan — consists of the 200 and the 650 Executive. Missing is the Burgman 125 available outside the U.S. market and the Burgman 400 not brought forward for 2017. Styled for classy good looks and a certain amount of sophistication, the Burgmans present a scooter that demands to be taken seriously in an otherwise ’wild spirit’ or retro-style scooter market.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Burgman.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-R125

2018 Suzuki GSX-R125

A Spunky 125 cc Sportbike

Suzuki doubles down in the worldwide race to the bottom with its newly-redesigned GSX-R125. This pocket-rocket carries the undeniable genetic markers and the typical, race-tastic visage associated with the family. Engine output falls just shy of 15 horsepower (11 kW) and displacement is just under the 125 cc mark as well, so British riders can use it on the road with just a CBT certificate. This is no accident, since indoctrination is best when started young, and only good things can come from instilling some brand loyalty right at the entry level. Sure, there are plenty of 125 cc two-wheelers out there, but many are cheap Chinese imports and the rest are scooters, so there’s definitely room in the market for a trainer bike with the name power and reputation of the Suzuki GSX-R family. Personally, I rather like these small-displacement sportbikes. Their simplicity is refreshing, and what they lack in top-end, they make up with handling which is where the fun is, anyway.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-R125.

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2018 Suzuki GSX-S1000

2018 Suzuki GSX-S1000

The Beauty Of A Gixxer Engine In A Naked Chassis

Suzuki’s race-tastic GSX-R family was a game changer when it hit the market 30-plus years ago, and its streetwise GSX-S range expanded that success. The factory expanded that footprint again in ’16 by bumping the 750 cc mill up to an (almost) even liter. This year, the family tree branched yet again with the new-for-2018, blackout GSX-S1000Z. Engine upgrades join other improvements for the 2018 model year as Suzuki pushes to keep its sport-standard-sector momentum going. I do consider this something of a risk as the market shifts to favor the youngest generation of riders with small-displacement engines and retro/hipster-style designs, but for the time being there seems to be enough support for the liter bikes. At least Suzuki hopes there is anyway.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-S1000.

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2016 - 2018 Suzuki DR-Z400S / DR-Z400SM

2016 - 2018 Suzuki DR-Z400S / DR-Z400SM

Suzuki Still Has Carbureted Dual Sports

Pitting the fuel-injection fans against the carburetor fans, we score a point for the latter with the DR-Z400S and DR-Z400SM from Suzuki. Fuel injection hadn’t yet made an appearance in any of Suzuki’s 2017 dual-sport lineup, which was a good thing or a bad thing, depending on which side of the fence you’re on. For 2018, the DR-Z siblings haven’t yet been touched by the FI update. Sharing the same engine as the 500EXC from KTM, the DR-Zs come on a different chassis with progressive-link rear suspension. The “SM” — the SuperMoto of the family — and the “S” feature a six-liter air box with quick-release fasteners trouble-free access to the air filter and special low profile mirrors that rotate hoping to avoid damage, both are pluses when you’re playing in the dirt.

Continue reading for more information on the Suzuki DR-Z400S and DR-Z400SM.

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2015 - 2018 Suzuki DR650S

2015 - 2018 Suzuki DR650S

A Hot Dual-Sport? Or Entry Adventure Bike?

With a glance at the DR650S from Suzuki and you might just dismiss it as an enduro bike. That would be doing it an injustice. It’s really a basic adventure bike that will get you off the pavement and into the woods with perhaps more gumption than a real adventure bike. It’s not the most attractive bike in the stable, though it’s small and scrappy with its 644 cc engine and so much fun to ride. Priced affordably, it isn’t a tragic to drop it as it would be otherwise and it is lightweight enough that you can pick it up and keep going.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki DR650S.

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2015 - 2018 Suzuki DR200S

2015 - 2018 Suzuki DR200S

A Tried-And-True Dual Sport

Suzuki brings dual-sport capabilities to the entry-level sector with its DR200S. A heavy emphasis on off-road performance defines the overall look of the thing, and a 199 cc engine drives it over hill and dale as well as down the road with all the appropriate lighting for safety and legalities. The end result seems to be a functional, if plain, bike that provides a stable ride and moderate power with a humble overall bearing. A carry-over for the last few years, it hasn’t changed much, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki DR200S.

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2017 - 2018 Suzuki VanVan 200

2017 - 2018 Suzuki VanVan 200

First out in the 1970s, the VanVan from Suzuki has that charming retro look that screams UJM. Recently reintroduced here in the U.S., the VanVan gets a 200 cc engine, an upgrade from the old 125 cc model that is still available in other markets. In typical scrambler fashion, the VanVan 200 is the dirt-road/gravel-road/loose-dirt ride that qualifies it as a “sandbike” because of the fat rear tire that keeps you going. Better than an ATV in some situations, the Vanvan is lightweight and capable, perfect for a jaunt around the ranch, a quick run up the trapline or an excursion down the beach — anywhere the ground is loose and four wheels just won’t do.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki Vanvan 200.

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