Models

view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000

2020 Suzuki GSX-R1000

It’s A Technological Showcase On Two Wheels

Suzuki improved its GSX-R1000 ahead of MY2020 in a bid to “reclaim the King of Sportbikes crown” as the factory so succinctly puts it. This rebuild comes close on the heels of the last revamp that landed just a couple short years ago, but it adds some significant features, most of which can be found “under the hood” or in the electronics suite. A couple of tweaks to the frame tune handling characteristics while the cornering ABS feature and variable valve-timing engine carries over from the previous generation. All in all, Suzuki turns in a very streetworthy racebike that’s nothing short of a technological showcase on two wheels.

Read more
2016 - 2020 Suzuki Hayabusa

2016 - 2020 Suzuki Hayabusa

It’ll Scare The Crap Out Of Someone Who Loves You

It’s a Hayabusa. Is there really anything more to be said? Suzuki’s Gixxer 1,340 cc monster speed machine is back again for 2020. The ’Busa is one of the biggest sportbikes out there, so yeah, big and heavy; you don’t want to go slow for very long. Once at speed, the bike is in its element. Look up ’Stupidfast’ in the dictionary and you’ll find a picture of a Hayabusa.

Read more
2017 - 2019 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

2017 - 2019 Suzuki GSX-R1000R

The Fiery-Eyed Pegdraggers Rejoice!

Coming off a fresh update in 2017, Suzuki carries its GSX-R1000R into MY2019 with a new color palette, but little else in the way of changes. The next-gen “Gixxer” 1000 brings an all-new 999.8 cc powerplant to the table with a claimed 199 horsepower at the shaft and a whole passel of electronic goodies to help manage all those ponies. Traction control, lean-sensitive ABS, launch control and more, Suzuki’s flagship literbike comes equipped with overlapping safety nets to help keep us mortal, non-professional riders dirty-side down as we explore our electronically augmented performance envelope. MotoGP tech influences the design to give the rider a little taste of track-day performance, or at the very least, ’performance light.’

Read more
2015 - 2016 Suzuki GSX-R1000 / GSX-R1000 Commemorative Edition

2015 - 2016 Suzuki GSX-R1000 / GSX-R1000 Commemorative Edition

The GSX-R1000 has been around for a minute, since it replaced the GSX-R1100 back in ’01 in fact, and 2016 sees the release of a total of three Gixxer 1000s with the GSX-R1000, the ABS version and the Commemorative model up for grabs. I’ve had an appreciation for Gixxers ever since I scared myself on one back in ’94, and the fact that Suzuki has managed to keep the family relevant for so long makes me appreciate it even more.

Buyer enthusiasm for race bikes is starting to wane a bit in favor of some of the more naked, streetwise machines, but Suzuki doesn’t let that dissuade them as they push right ahead with their flagship production racebike. Join me while I take a look at what Suzuki has going on with this latest effort to keep things going with the venerable Gixxer line.

Continue reading for my review of the Suzuki GSX-R1000.

Read more
Roger Hayden To Ride Commemorative GSX-R1000 At The Indianapolis Grand Prix

Roger Hayden To Ride Commemorative GSX-R1000 At The Indianapolis Grand Prix

American rider Roger Hayden will be in attendance at the 2015 Red Bull Indianapolis Grand Prix with a special Suzuki GSX-R decked out in a special livery to commemorate the bike’s 30th anniversary. It’s going to be a big weekend for the GSX-R and Suzuki is making sure that the bike gets the attention it deserves.

As such, Hayden will be riding a GSX-R1000 that’s been dressed up in the red and black colors that adorned Kevin Schwantz’s bike when it made its debut at the AMA Superbike round in Yoshimura, Japan back in 1986. Hayden himself will be dressed for the occasion, which in this case is a custom-commemorative race suit that’s consistent with what his Yoshimura Superbike crew will wear. Heck, even the tire warmers will carry the same tribute livery for one of the most important race bikes to compete in the US.

All together, Hayden and his entire crew will use the weekend to celebrate a momentous occasion in Suzuki’s long and storied motor racing history. The team will be competing in the Indy MotoAmerica Superbike race, determined, I think, to win it for the Suzuki GSX-R1000. That would be a fine tribute to the bike. It’s fitting, too, since the GSX-R holds the record as the all-time wins leader in AMA Superbike history. More importantly, it’s also the same bike that’s largely credited for being the first of its kind to bring cutting edge Grand Prix design and technology to the public roads.

Anybody who knows about the history of motorcycle racing in the US still hold reverence to the success that’s been credited to the GSX-R. So as Suzuki celebrates the bike’s 30th anniversary, there’s no better way to pay homage to one of the finest machines the AMA Superbike has ever seen than by celebrating its anniversary in the Brickyard, long considered as America’s most hallowed racing ground.

Continue reading to read more about Suzuki’s 30th anniversary plans for the GSX-R.

Read more
2015 Suzuki GSX1250SE

2015 Suzuki GSX1250SE

The 2015 GSX1250SE — available in limited markets — is the 1,255 cc member of the Suzuki GSX lineup, closest spec-wise to the new 2016 GSX-S1000 and a much beefier version of the GSX-750. With ample saddlebags and rear case, a 19-liter fuel tank, comfortable seating and suspension travel that’s almost into offroad range, the GSX1250SE fits the bill as a tourer or fully luggaged sportbike for travel on both smooth pavement and less-than-well-maintained roads.

Continue reading for my review of the 2015 Suzuki GSX1250SE.

Read more
2016 Suzuki GSX-S1000F ABS

2016 Suzuki GSX-S1000F ABS

Suzuki carries their heritage GSX-R bikes to the street with the GSX-S models. New for 2016, the GSX-S1000F ABS is a full-fairing version of the 2016 GSX-S1000 ABS. Promoting the GSX-S1000 as a ’standard’ or ’streetfighter’ bike (neither sport nor touring), Suzuki seems to think that simply adding a full fairing qualifies the GSX-S1000F as a ’sport-tourer.’ I disagree. With a pillion that looks like nothing more than a hint of a seat and no storage, I’m not sure how to classify this bike in terms of sport or touring. Let’s just look at it for what it is and see how it shapes up.

Continue reading for my review of the 2016 Suzuki GSX-S1000F ABS

Read more
Video: Joey Gladstone Hits 217 MPH On A Wheelie Bar-Less Suzuki Hayabusa

Video: Joey Gladstone Hits 217 MPH On A Wheelie Bar-Less Suzuki Hayabusa

Professional motorcycle rider Joey Gladstone is no stranger to running demented motorcycles in a drag strip. That’s where he made his name and quite frankly, he’s become well-known for it. Recently, Gladstone showcased his motorcycle drag racing prowess at the Maryland International Raceway where he successfully rode the fastest “no wheelie bar” bike to a quarter-mile time of just 6.56 with a top speed of 217 mph.

This video showcases Gladstone’s incredible run, which was largely made possible by this heavily modified Suzuki Hayabusa that shot to that top speed without the benefit of wheelie bars installed on the back of the bike. That’s an incredible achievement, especially when you consider that hitting a top speed of 217 mph is normally reserved for modified street cars. Even in the case of motorcycles, covering that much ground so quickly usually comes with the help of the aforementioned wheelie bars instead of the more traditional drag swingarm that Gladstone’s Hayabusa had.

Any which way you want to slice it, Joey Gladstone once again showed us that when it comes to pealing off a piece of a drag strip with insane runs like this, there aren’t a lot of riders who can do it quite like him.

Read more
Suzuki Takes The Name Suzuki Ecstar in MotoGP Return

Suzuki Takes The Name Suzuki Ecstar in MotoGP Return

Suzuki hasn’t been seen or heard from in the paddock of MotoGP since 2011 when the Japanese bikemaker unexpectedly departed the most prestigious motorcycle racing series in the world. Over the next three seasons, Suzuki didn’t compete in MotoGP, only appearing once last season as a a wild card entry at Valencia, Spain.

Well, Suzuki’s making a triumphant comeback this season and it’s officially returning to MotoGP as the Suzuki Ecstar team.

The Japanese company officially announced the partnership, oddly enough with its own brand of engine oil serving as the titular sponsor of the team. Guess it works better in-house in Suzuki, doesn’t it?

In addition to announcing the team’s official name, the launch also gave us the first glimpse of the newly developed Suzuki GSX-RR that the team is set to use in its first season back in MotoGP. Dressed in the team’s new livery, the pair of GSX-RR models will be ridden by Aleix Espargaro and 2013 Moto3 champion Maverick Vinales. The team definitely picked two pretty exciting young drivers to lead its comeback. In fact, Espargaro already has some experience in MotoGP, finishing last season in seventh overall place while riding for Forward Yamaha.

Suzuki’s return to MotoGP under the Suzuki Ecstar team will undoubtedly add some intrigue to the 2015 MotoGP season, as if it needs to add more storylines to the myriad of juicy subplots already being talked about in the series.

Welcome back, Suzuki. We’re glad to have you back in MotoGP.

Click "continue reading" to read more about the Suzuki’s return to MotoGP under the Suzuki Ecstar name.

Read more
Video: Suzuki Hayabusa vs Ferrari 458 Italia

Video: Suzuki Hayabusa vs Ferrari 458 Italia

There aren’t a lot of cars today that can match wits with a Ferrari 458 Italia. The same can be said for motorcycles, but if there’s one super bike that can hold its own against Maranello’s finest, the Suzuki Hayabusa is one of them.

The Hayabusa was at one point considered the fastest motorcycle in the world, capable of hitting a top speed of 190 mph. That number is not too far off of the 458’s own top speed of around 200 mph.

If you needed any more proof that the Hayabusa has the wheels to match up against the 458 Italia, this video posted by GTBoard will have all your answers. The video itself is pretty dated, but who cares! It’s a Ferrari 458 taking on a Suzuki Hayabusa!

That’s the kind of cross-world match-up that will get auto and bike enthusiasts lining up just to witness. The Hayabusa may have won this particular showdown, but the real winners here are those who were able to see the two machines go head-to-head.

Now, can somebody do this again in a more modern setting? We all deserve as much, right?

Read more

Web Glitch on Suzuki Site Accidentally Reveals Power Output for the GSX-S1000 and GSX-S1000F

Suzuki has gained a reputation as a pretty secretive motorcycle company. Whenever a new Suzuki model comes out, the Japanese bike make ensures that as much information about the bike is kept under wraps. Actually, everybody does this, but Suzuki is probably one of the best at keeping details about its yet-to-be revealed bikes under lock and key.

Recently, though, somebody over at Suzuki, presumably within its online department, bumbled a pretty crucial information about the brand’s new GSX-S1000 and GSX-S1000F bikes. According to Motorrad, the Suzuki website briefly, if not inexplicably, revealed the power figures of the two sports bikes. The information has since been taken down, but for those who are curious to know what it is, the GSX-S1000 and the GSX-S1000F will be packing 145 horsepower at 9,500 rpm. Chalk this incident up to a sudden case of carelessness.

The number isn’t at all surprising, even if Suzuki has taken extraordinary steps to keep it on lockdown. For one, 1000PS interviewed Gerald Steinmann of Suzuki back in October 2014 and he let slip that the GSX-S1000F could pack “more than 160 horsepower.”
145 ponies isn’t at all bad, but it’s still not the “over 160” that I personally thought the bikes were going to have at their disposal. That said, 145 horsepower is still pretty good considering that both bikes are still being powered by old-by-comparison GSX-R1000 motor. In some ways, getting 145 horsepower out of it is actually pretty neat and could go a long way in giving the two GSX-S models the needed bump it needs to compete with some of its highly touted rivals in the sports bike segment.

At the end of the day, though, Suzuki’s decision to take down the output numbers of the two bikes seem to suggest that the company is either still undecided about how much power it can and will have when the bikes are finally ready to head out to market or it’s just really protective of the cards it has in its hands before they decide to reveal them to the world.

Let’s just all hope that it gives the green light to reveal the actual numbers soon.

Click past the jump to read more about the info leak on Suzuki’s website.

Read more
New Suzuki Trademarks Point to Return of Katana and Gamma Names

New Suzuki Trademarks Point to Return of Katana and Gamma Names

Could there be a storm brewing deep inside Hamamatsu? That appears to be the case after Suzuki has began the process of re-registering the Katana and Gamma names, adding fire to the increasing speculation that the Japanese bikemaker is preparing to bring back the two motorcycle families into the fold.

Here’s what we know so far: Suzuki registered the Katana name and logo with both the US and European trademark offices. Meanwhile, the Gamma logo was re-registered in the European trademark office. That’s about it.

Granted, it’s not much to go by, but if you think about it, Suzuki wouldn’t take these steps and then just live these new trademarks idle, sitting in the garage collecting some dust. There’s a plan behind these new registrations, even if the specifics at this point are still murky at best.

The Katana is the intriguing name because it could add fuel to the likelihood of the turbocharged Recursion Concept finding its way to production in the near future.

Remember, the Katana used to be a a line of performance-oriented bikes that was eventually absorbed into the sport-touring market. The return of the Katana name and the admittedly awesome Katana logo could mean that Suzuki’s preparing to dust off the old performance family and bring it back to prominence.

As for the Gamma, it’s possible that Suzuki’s bringing back that name, albeit in a different configuration from its previous incarnation. Short-lived as it was, the Suzuki RG500 Gamma had its fair share of admirers as a 500cc two-stroke superbike. This time around, there’s a sliver of chance that Suzuki could opt to take four-stroke route for the Gamma.

That could be the reason why Suzuki left out the Gamma in the US trademarks office since on-road two-stroke bikes are frowned upon in these roads.

Whatever Suzuki’s plans are for re-registering these two names, it’s clear that the company’s planning for some kind of model uprising in the future.

Click past the jump to read more about Suzuki’s plans.

Read more
Video: Suzuki Chronicles Development of GSX-RR Ahead of 2015 MotoGP Season

Video: Suzuki Chronicles Development of GSX-RR Ahead of 2015 MotoGP Season

Suzuki hasn’t been involved in MotoGP since 2011 so you can imagine the excitement and buzz surrounding the company’s announcement that it’s heading back to the grid for the 2015 MotoGP season. Like any true company that sees value in generating more publicity with its return to motor racing, Suzuki didn’t waste any time producing a new documentary that highlights the development of its new - and official - MotoGP racer, the GSX-RR.

The bike itself only tells part of Suzuki’s return to MotoGP story. The team made waves last season when it emerged as a wild card entry at Valencia, Spain, but the pomp and circumstance behind that testing cameo ended with a whimper when test rider Randy De Puniet was forced to retire due to technical problems. With a full offseason under its belt, it looks like Suzuki is now armed and ready to return to MotoGP with a bang.

The team’s prospects lie in its two race riders, Aleix Espargaro and Maverick Vinales, two young drivers that are slowly making waves in the motor racing scene. But the team’s fortunes don’t just rest on Espargaro and Vinales. Much has also been made of the maddening GSX-RR, which is currently in the middle of testing and development in time for its own maiden voyage in MotoGP. Suzuki’s decision to ditch its old V4 architecture in favor of using an inline-four engine on the GSX-RR has already paid dividends, and that in turn has drummed up enormous expectations for Suzuki, its riders, and its fancy new racing bike.

The question now is whether Suzuki has the chops to challenge two-time champion Marc Marquez and the Repsol Honda team for the title. Marquez is the golden boy of MotoGP these days so the task of unseating him is daunting, to say the least. But if the Suzuki GSX-RR is all it’s being promised to be, then we might be in for an exciting 2015 MotoGP season.

Read more
2015 Suzuki GSX1250FA

2015 Suzuki GSX1250FA

The Suzuki GSX 1250 FA has all it needs to impress you with its sporty handling and top notch performances.

It features an aerodynamic fairing, a relatively comfortable riding position and plenty of high end technologies especially developed to help it stay well planted on its wheels at both low and high speeds.

The motorcycle is built around a 4 stroke, 4 cylinder, liquid cooled engine with a displacement of 1255 Cc. The engine’s power is kept in check by a six constant mesh transmission.

The engine is mounted on a classic tube-frame chassis which sits on 43mm stanchion-tube front forks offer( 5.1 inches of wheel travel) and a single rear shock (5.4 inches of wheel travel).

As far as prices are concerned, the Suzuki GSX 1250 FA can be yours for no less than $11,399.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX 1250 FA.

Read more
2015 Suzuki Hayabusa

2015 Suzuki Hayabusa

Since its inception, the Suzuki Hayabusa was considered one of the fastest bikes from the streets and in the latest year has been constantly upgraded and refined,

The 2015 model year features fresh radial-mount Brembo Monobloc front brake calipers which are lighter and more rigid than conventional bolt-together calipers. It is also worthy of being mentioned that the piston diameter was enlarged from 32-30mm to 32-32mm, thus significantly improving the stopping power.

The motorcycle weighs 266 kg and at its heart sits a 4-stroke, liquid-cooled, 4-cylinder, DOHC engine with a displacement of 1340cc. The engine’s power is transferred to the rear wheel by means of a 6-Speed, Constant Mesh transmission.

The 2015 Suzuki Hayabusa is offered with a base price of $14,599.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2015 Suzuki Hayabusa.

Read more
2014 Suzuki GSX-R600 Tyco Race Replica

2014 Suzuki GSX-R600 Tyco Race Replica

Meet the Suzuki GSX-R600 Tyco Race Replica. This special edition comes with a series of special features which give it a racy look further enhancing the aggressive character of the GSX-R600.

Among the features offered by the motorcycle you’ll find a special paint job, a Yoshimura R11 silencer with titanium body and carbon end cap, a double bubble screen, a solo seat cowl and Suzuki’s genuine paddock stand and bobbins.

At the heart of the motorcycle sits a 599 cc, 4-stroke, 4-cylinder, liquid-cooled, DOHC engine which is mated on a six speed constant mesh transmission. The unit generates a maximum output of 92.50 kW (124.00 hp) at 13500 rpm and 69.60N.M (51.00lb.Ft) at 11500 rpm. In terms of efficiency the unit delivers a fuel consumption of 55.08 mpg.

The bike is offered with a base price of €12.792.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX-R600 Tyco Race Replica.

Read more
2014 Suzuki GSX1250FA Z

2014 Suzuki GSX1250FA Z

The Suzuki GSX1250FAZ was designed with sportiness, comfort and agility in mind, so is packed with a wide range of features and technologies which help it deliver superior ride and handling abilities.

But apart from being fast and agile, the Suzuki GSX1250FAZ is also a looker. The sleek, dramatic style of its aerodynamic fairing is further enhanced by the contrasting wheel stripes and a blue/black three colour graphic scheme running from front to rear.

The motorcycle is propelled by a 4 stroke, 4 cylinder, liquid cooled, DOHC engine with a capacity of 1255 cc. The engine generates a maximum output of 72.00 kW (97.00hp) at 7500rpm and 108.00 Nm (80.00lb.Ft) of torque at 3700 rpm. All this power is kept under control by a 6-speed constant mesh transmission.

The Suzuki GSX1250FA Z is offered with a base price of €9.719.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX1250FAZ.

Read more
2014 Suzuki GSX650F

2014 Suzuki GSX650F

The Suzuki GSX650F is a versatile motorcycle that can deal great with a wide range of activities. Its comfortable riding position and potent engine makes it great for long journeys, but on the other hand, its easy handling and decent efficiency helps it feel comfortable in the city too.

Power comes from a 4-stroke, 4-cylinder, liquid-cooled, DOHC engine with a displacement of 656 cc. The unit is mated to a 6-speed constant mesh transmission and generates a maximum output of 62.35 kW (84.00hp) at 10500 rpm and 61.50 Nm (45.00lb.Ft) of torque at 8900 rpm.

As far as suspensions are concerned, the Suzuki GSX650F if equipped with pre-load adjustable front and rear suspensions which were especially designed to enhance the motorcycle’s handling abilities.

Suzuki GSX650F is offered with a base price of €7.583 and the ABS version can be yours for €8.066.

Hit the jump for more information on the Suzuki GSX650F.

Read more