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2020 Triumph Thruxton RS

2020 Triumph Thruxton RS

It’s the original café racer, but with more power and better handling

Triumph Motorcycles took last year’s Thruxton R and levied a bevy of improvements to create the new-for-2020 Thruxton RS. The tuneup is far from just being a facelift. Power increased almost 8 horsepower on the torque-rich powerplant, the bike dropped about 13 pounds from its curb weight, and grunt comes on earlier for a broader, more useful powerband. Triumph finished it off with top-shelf safety electronics, contemporary style, and a two-tone paint package over a blackout frame and powerplant.

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Top 5 new Retro Classics/Standards coming in 2020

Top 5 new Retro Classics/Standards coming in 2020

Chrome, laced wheels, round headlamp, upright bars – bring on the retro

Timeless designs that take you back to the pre-’60s era heightened the feeling of riding free-spirited machines and the sense of freedom. This is what a modern-day classic motorcycle offers without that knuckle bending fixes and ghastly scenes of oil dripping everywhere. Here are our top five standards/classic motorcycles coming in 2020 that takes us back to the time from the ’60s.

Recalling the past glories, these neo-classic motorcycles have still managed to retain the charm and posterity of minimalistic elegance along with providing modern day mechanicals and the bits. They run on efficient high output engines that are both reliable and powerful and are equipped with state of the art suspension and brake setups that will bring the bike to a halt not far from their point of application, unlike the yesteryears.

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Which motorcycles on sale today give the best mpg?

Which motorcycles on sale today give the best mpg?

And a guide to help you extract maximum mileage off a tank of fuel from your motorcycle

The beginning of this century saw the world views changing gradually towards climate change and the need to preserve the environment. This, along with stringent policies, has forced the manufacturers to develop motorcycles that can run cleaner fuel and extract the maximum economy from it, sometimes even at the cost of performance.

Bad news for people who seek the element of thrill, but a pretty good one for someone living in urban jungles where folks prefer commuting on a motorcycle rather thank a car for its practicality and frugal fuel-efficiency. Then there are us few who love the idea of putting serious miles on two-wheels and living the adventure.

We here have compiled a list to give you the best available tools for such situations and save some money on gas while at it.

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2016 - 2019 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / 1200 R

2016 - 2019 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / 1200 R

For The Classic Cafe’ Racer, Thruxton Is Hard To Beat

Triumph has been busy as of late, expending vast energies and resources reinvigorating the venerable Bonneville range. The Thruxton family got some lovin’ in 2016 and the new incarnation certainly had big shoes to fill considering the fame and glory associated with the Thruxton name from back in the ’60s and ’70s, a fact not lost on the designers. A brand-new engine drives the range, and a whole host of modern, race-tastic features brings the old-school cafe’ racer look to the table with contemporary performance and features that make it less like just a tribute piece, and more of a modern machine with real-world relevance.

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2019 Triumph Bonneville T120 ACE

2019 Triumph Bonneville T120 ACE

Paying Tribute To London’s Ace Cafe And The Original Café Racers

Triumph enjoys some of the deepest roots around, and it takes advantage of them with the new Bonneville T120 ACE. The “Ace” comes loaded with retro styling and old-school custom flavor for a double-whammy of dated British style. Under the hood, the Ace is a thoroughly modern ride with a robust electronics suite and powerful engine to go with contemporary comforts and convenience.

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2017 - 2019 Triumph Street Cup

2017 - 2019 Triumph Street Cup

Everything You’d Expect From A Contemporary Café Racer

Triumph expanded its Bonneville Street Twin family a bit to include the new-in-2017 Street Cup. The SC brings the café-tastic vibe of the Thruxton to a smaller engine bracket with a 900 cc mill, thus opening up the club-racing world to entry-level riders and offering experienced riders the option of downsizing for convenience without giving up too much in the way of fun. Sporty and quick, this ride seems to be everything one would expect from a contemporary café racer.

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Top 10 Cafe-Racers of 2018

Top 10 Cafe-Racers of 2018

Lightweight, lightly powered motorcycle optimized for speed and handling. And all about the ’70s

Racing on bikes from café to café before a song could finish was the most therapeutic thing to have happened for motorcyclists in the ‘70s. Inspired by this culture, people and manufacturers started building motorcycles with minimal components to take them the distance in the shortest time. It embodied the classic café-racer cues taking us back in time with modern design bits and sophisticated packaging.

Here is our list of the best ten motorcycles of 2018 that remind us of that ‘70s. Round headlights, debonair half-shell fairing, humped seat, rear seat cowl, extended wheelbase, and the low-slung handlebar, it’s all in each one of these machines:

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Buying a Thruxton R? You can now get a $2500 worth Cafe-Racer kit for free

Buying a Thruxton R? You can now get a $2500 worth Cafe-Racer kit for free

There is a catch though. And you need to be quick on your feet

We all love the very beautiful Triumph Thruxton, don’t we? Over the last many years, the Triumph Thruxton has been giving us the unadulterated essence of motorcycling with its simplistic café racer stance and smooth power delivery.

Making the timeless design further enchanting is the ‘Track Racer Kit’, a genuine accessory kit provided by Triumph worth $2500. And now, until December 31 this year, Triumph is giving away this kit to every new owner of the Thruxton 1200 R for free of charge.

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Royal Enfield will get two models in its upcoming 750cc range.

Royal Enfield will get two models in its upcoming 750cc range.

Apart from the Cafe-Racer styled, there will be a classic retro motorcycle running on the 750cc unit.

In a bid to create a niche market for themselves, the post-British Royal Enfield has a newfound interest in having multiple cylinders under its hood with added capacities. As we have been speculating about it ever since it was caught testing in Spain last year, fresh new spied shots of the bike has been surfacing the internet for a while now.

With these latest image snapped by enthusiasts on a social media platform, we now have proof of not one, but two 750cc motorcycles will be joining the bandwagon for 2018. Although there is minimal camouflaging, I think I’ve already fallen for this Classic 750 sprouting in all vibrant colours.

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2014 Triumph Thruxton

2014 Triumph Thruxton

Have I mentioned lately how much I love it when a manufacturer reproduces a classic look while blessing it with contemporary technology? Well, I do, so you can imagine my delight when I laid eyes on the 2014 Thruxton 900 from Triumph. From the bullet front fairing, across the knee-dent fuel tank to the tail fairing, this bike embodies the 1960’s cafe’ racer vibe, and Triumph furthers this historical connection by naming this model after the famed Thruxton Race Track. Best of all, the retro good looks are backed up by subtle improvements, such as the fuel injectors hidden in the ’carburetors’ and disc brakes instead of the old drums, among others that I will touch on later. Overall, the factory designed this bike to serve as a daily commuter/weekend burner with a liberal dose of nostalgia added.

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2015 Triumph Thruxton

2015 Triumph Thruxton

The Triumph Thruxton was inspired by the classic café racers of the 1960s. It features a retro style with a classic paint scheme, low and narrow Ace handlebars and twin instrument pods.

Like it was expected, the bike comes with an upright riding position which helps it be perfectly suited for a wide range of activities.

The motorcycle’s frame has a simple tubular steel construction offering a perfect balance between lightness and rigidity. The frame houses an 865 cc, air-cooled, DOHC, parallel-twin engine which cranks out a maximum output of 69BHP at 7400 rpm and 69NM at 5800 rpm.

As far as the stopping power is concerned, the Triumph Thruxton is fitted a big 320mm single disc up front and a rear single 255mm disc.

The Triumph Thruxton is offered with a base price of £7,699.

Hit the jump for more information on the Triumph Thruxton.

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2013 Triumph Thruxton

2013 Triumph Thruxton

With its classy lines, big headlight and the refined fuel tank, the 2013 Triumph Thruxton is certainly an eye catcher that will appeal to those who are searching for a classic looking café racer.

Once on board you are met by low rise bars and a spacious seat which combine to offer a pretty sporty riding position. Other features worthy of being mentioned include the aluminum-rimmed spoked wheels (18 inch front and 17 inch rear), megaphone style exhaust and front and rear disc brakes.

The 2013 Triumph Thruxton is built around a modern 865cc parallel-twin, air-cooled, DOHC engine which rewards you with a maximum output of 68 hp at 7400 rpm and 69 Nm of torque at 5800 rpm. The engine’s power is kept under control by a five speed transmission which offers an average fuel efficiency of 50 mpg.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2013 Triumph Thruxton.

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Triumph Bonneville café racer by LSL

Triumph Bonneville café racer by LSL

Although it looks like a whole new British bike, this is actually LSL’s Triumph Bonneville ‘Tridays’ Limited edition café racer that the German accessories and customizing specialists have built for the three-day Triumph motorcycle reunion held in Neukirchen, Austria this year from 25-27th of June.

Starting from a 2010 Bonneville, the LSL team has painted the alloy wheels in black and brought in a Remus exhaust, YSS shocks, new instrumentation, ace bars, racer-style seat and polished alloy mudguards, just to name a few of the bike’s distinctive features.

LSL will only build twenty such units and plans on selling them for $16,445 (€12,950). The price also includes a package trip to the Tridays festival. Visit the Tridays website for more information.

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Triumph Bonneville by Deus

Triumph Bonneville by Deus

There’s little what people reproach to the standard Triumph Bonneville, but at seeing what the guys at Deus can do with it, suddenly there’s a whole lot needing to be improved. If it is to follow the Deus recipe, the Bonnie would have to be 2 inches lower and 2.5 inches longer than the original. Still, the modified rear frame section makes for a 4 inches shorter tail section.

Triumph Bonneville by Deus

This gives ‘Dave’s Bonny’ an aggressive stance and sure makes it a greater performer at high speeds, but there’s a whole list of features that make this café racer special. While you can check those out in the list found below, we’ll just name some of the parts that make this project stand out. To begin with, the tricked out Bonnie features a Kawasaki W650 tank with the fuel injection unit tucked inside and a Deus fiberglass seat unit. At the front, Dave gets 41mm clip-ons from Australian specialist Tingate and Triumph Trophy 955 handbar controls. We also like the Deus headlight brackets.

In the end, the bike looks nice and clean with all the wiring hidden but it is the custom paint job by Dutchy that finishes it even nicer. Also note the black powdercoated engine covers and 2-pack gloss black fuel injection bodies.

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Triumph Speed Triple by Schneider

Triumph Speed Triple by Schneider

Take a look at this bike and you’ll most likely have troubles recognizing it as being a Triumph Speed Triple (at least we did), much less uncover the special features that made the transformation into custom possible. The bike was customized by Austrian Triumph specialist Julian Schneider for his own use on the twisties of the Austrian Alps.

Schneider, who is actually a fan of New Zealand motorcycle racer and land speed record holder Burt Munro, has actually called his bike the Burt Munro Edition. Although it won’t set any records as it is powered by the original engine, which only got some intake modifications and a Supertrapp exhaust, this Triumph should now handle and feel much sweeter considering the great number of aftermarket parts. It features full Ohlins suspensions and a steering damper, Marchesini magnesium wheels and a Beringer brake system. Also, the LSL bars, footrests and headlight as well as the Magura brake and clutch controls together with the several other Rizoma parts contribute at turning this into a completely different ride.

Overall, the bike looks like a modern café racer and the red/black with gold stripes and rims looks just striking.

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Greymouth, a very special way to Triumph

Greymouth, a very special way to Triumph

Although the paintjob on this café racer makes it look like a Norton, this is actually a very special Triumph Thruxton that pulled the lucky card when ending up in the hands of Austrian Triumph dealer Jurgen Schnaller. The ‘Greymouth’, as it is called, gets upgraded engine and chassis components enhancing the sporty side of the already great British bike.

The engine, which now features high compression pistons, ported and polished head and high lift camshafts while being fed through new flat side Keihin carbs and fitted with a Raask exhaust, is claimed to be 26bhp more powerful than on the stock bike. On the chassis side, the upgraded Wilbers front and rear suspensions are meant to cope with the extra performance.

You decide if the Schnaller Thruxton is worth €18000 ($24,340) as we can’t help but wonder how it feels when ridden.

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Custom: Triumph Thunderbird Café Racer

Custom: Triumph Thunderbird Café Racer

Café racing passionate Sivert Raask from Sweden has recently presented his latest work, the Triumph Thunderbird 1600 Café Racer, which he seriously modified using parts from his own rear-sets and accessories shop, Raask. The bike gets a Ducati 900 tank, home-made seat as well as new exhausts and bikini fairing.

You can imagine where the rearsets and new speedometer have come from, but this actually looks like a great achievement considering that the Triumph Thunderbird isn’t a naked bike, but a veritable cruiser, meaning a long way from being turned into a café racer. Yet this one is and a very nice one too.

Raask bought the motorcycle new in August and transformed it over the winter. This is by far the first café racer he built and we reckon it won’t be the last either. Just read what the man has to say about his passion for café racers:

“Café racers have always been my favourite bikes. Back in 1967 I bought a boat ticket from Gothenburg to London, bought a used Norton Atlas, then brought it home and rebuilt it as a café racer.I did the same with a Commando.”

“More recently I’ve built café racer versions of the latest Bonneville and Rocket III so when I first saw the new Thunderbird I immediately thought it would be perfect to make into a café racer.”

And he did, right before Christmas, but we hear it wasn’t test ridden yet, so we should find out more about it after the Triumph Thunderbird Café Racer starts doing what it knows best.

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Triumph Thruxton café racer by Pure Triumph

Triumph Thruxton café racer by Pure Triumph

Take a look at what started life as a 2009 Triumph Thruxton and you, as us, will most likely come to the conclusion that almost all British bikes can be transformed into café racers as long as someone is willing to pay the buck. This unique bike right here was built by Pure Triumph and it features all the possible changes and aftermarket parts that a demanding rider could wish for. To begin with, we’re talking about upside down 50mm Showa forks and competition spec Bitabo multi adjustable shocks, which together with the 17-inch wheels (please note the 180 section of the rear tire) make sure the bike is able to go very fast around corners, just like a café racer should. Also, twin four-pot Tokico calipers and radial master cylinder won’t make a rider hope for the best during emergency braking.

As you may have noticed, the frame remains the same and it is the other chassis parts that upgrade the overall product. Same thing with the engine: the internals remain unchanged, while the thing now gets an independent fuel-injection system.

Stylistically, an alloy T140 tank, an Alcantara leather seat and a ‘68 style rear section make every café racer fan crave for such a therapist, but we’re sad to announce that this precise one recently sold out. Yet, the Triumph dealer doesn’t stop here and plans an even better version.

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