Triumph Street Bike Motorcycles

Models
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2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster

2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster

2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster
2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster
2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster
2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster
2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster
2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster
2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster
2016 - 2017 Triumph America / America LT / Speedmaster

Triumph returns in 2017 with three bikes in the America/Speedmaster family: the America, the America LT and the Speedmaster. All three models come with that bullet-proof 865 cc engine found in the Bonneville T100 and Thruxton.

Hanging onto its retro look but with modern tech where it counts, the America, its touring sibling, the America LT, and its black-and-bling stablemate, the Speedmaster, are nimble with not a lot of power, but still fun to ride. Triumph says of their Bonneville-based cruisers, "The heart and soul of British engineering reinvented with a splash of Stateside style." I have to agree.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph America, America LT and Speedmaster.

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2017 Triumph Street Triple

2017 Triumph Street Triple

2017 Triumph Street Triple
2017 Triumph Street Triple
2017 Triumph Street Triple
2017 Triumph Street Triple
2017 Triumph Street Triple
2017 Triumph Street Triple
2017 Triumph Street Triple
2017 Triumph Street Triple

We live in a world where frequently less is perceived to be more, and nowhere is that truer than in the naked sportbike sector. Triumph started leaning toward the scantily-clad market with its Daytona 675 back in the first decade of the new millenium, and now has released a more refined, next-gen naked line with its new Street Triple family. Sleek and sheik, the three current members of Triumph’s wee nudist colony definitely brings sexy back along with a healthy dose of performance and electronic gadgetry to boot. Folks, this is a brand-spankin’-new trio of rides, and if you’re anything like me, you have a healthy respect for British engineering and can’t wait to dig into this new triple-play from across the pond, so let’s get to it.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Street Triple.

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2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE

2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE

2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE
2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE
2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE
2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE
2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE
2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE
2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE
2014 - 2016 Triumph Trophy SE

The newest incarnation of the Trophy launched by Triumph in 2012 puts the luxury in luxury touring. The 1215 cc engine — also used in the Tiger Explorer — gives smooth power delivery and packs a respectable punch when it comes to torque and horsepower. Available only in select markets, the Trophy SE is lightweight for a tourer and comes with amenities you’d expect to see on a bike intended to go the distance.
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Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Trophy SE.

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2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R

2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R

2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R
2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R
2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R
2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R
2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R
2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R
2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R
2016 Triumph Daytona 675 / Daytona 675 R

Back in the early 2000s, Triumph’s four-cylinder, middleweight sportbikes were taking a beating by the 600 cc bikes from the Big Four in Japan. The solution? Drop a cylinder, boost the cubes and start a nearly complete, ground-up rebuild based off the old Daytona 600 chassis.

The result? A decidedly nimble and powerful supersport packed away in a deceptively small package. After a number of changes, and the addition of the Daytona 675 R in 2011 that went on to win the Daytona 200 in ’14, the Daytona family moves into the ’15 and ’16 model years with many of the features that made the range a success, and a few new ones too.

Join me while I dissect this British Rose and try to discover why its fanbase is so rabid, far beyond the usual national/brand loyalty we see all the time.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Daytona 675 and Daytona 675 R.

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2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT

2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT

2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT
2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT
2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT
2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT
2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT
2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT
2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT
2016 Triumph Thunderbird Storm / Thunderbird Commander / Thunderbird LT

Like nearly all of Triumph Motorcycle’s current offerings, the Thunderbird family has some very deep roots indeed. A design dreamed up by Edward Turner, the Thunderbird made its debut run from 1949 to 1966, and reappeared in Triumph’s lineup a number of times with different engines and designs.

Originally called the 6T “Thunderbird,” the 1950 year-model 6T was made famous with Americans by Hollywood in 1953 when it was immortalized in the Marlon Brando picture The Wild One, and our love affair with the family (and outlaw biker culture) has endured through the years.

Today I want to take a look at the newest Thunderbird range which includes the Commander, Storm and LT, to see if they live up to the name they bear. The word “icon” gets thrown around a lot these days, almost to the point that it has lost some of its impact, but the Thunderbird and its paper dart actually fit the bill. In other words, these three machines have some pretty big shoes to fill. Let’s see how they do, shall we?

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Thunderbird Storm, Thunderbird Commander, and Thunderbird LT.

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2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R

2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R

2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R
2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R
2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R
2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R
2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R
2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R
2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R
2016 Triumph Thruxton 1200 / Thruxton 1200 R

Triumph has been busy as of late, expending vast energies and resources reinvigorating the venerable Bonneville range, and they’ve finally gotten around to the Thruxton family.

The new incarnation certainly has big shoes to fill considering the fame and glory associated with the Thruxton name from back in the ’60s and ’70s, a fact not lost on the designers. A brand-new engine drives the range, and a whole host of modern, race-tastic features brings the old-school cafe’ racer look to the table with contemporary performance and features that make it less like just a tribute piece, and more of a modern machine with real-world relevance. Join me while I dissect the new family and discover what all Triumph has in store for us with this pair of new-for-2016 rides.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Thruxton 1200 and Thruxton 1200 R.

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2016 Triumph Rocket III

2016 Triumph Rocket III

2016 Triumph Rocket III
2016 Triumph Rocket III
2016 Triumph Rocket III
2016 Triumph Rocket III
2016 Triumph Rocket III
2016 Triumph Rocket III
2016 Triumph Rocket III
2016 Triumph Rocket III

It goes without saying that Triumph has some deep roots, and the factory has absolutely zero compunction about relying on past successes. Not to suggest it rests on its laurels, far from it, merely pointing out the depth of heritage Trumpet brings to the table. The Rocket III family of bikes benefits from this practice, and the Roadster and Touring models share roots that go all the way back to 1968 to the BSA Rocket 3 “Trident.”

Built to compete with other large-displacement cruisers in the American market, the Rocket III range really brings the pain to its competitors with an incredible powerplant tucked away within rides that seem somewhat familiar, even typical, to riders accustomed to the domestic scene. I must confess that I’ve been looking forward to looking at these bikes, primarily because, well, Triumph, but also because the aptly-named, Rocket family is going to hurt an awful lot of feelings amongst both the domestic manufacturers and imports alike. Let the games begin.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Rocket II Roadster and Rocket II Touring.

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2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R

2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R

2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R
2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R
2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R
2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R
2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R
2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R
2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R
2016 Triumph Speed Triple S / Speed Triple R

When I hear the name “Triumph,” my mind immediately goes to the old classic styles, or the new bikes made to look like the old classic style, and always within cruiser/standard bracket.

Given the long history of cruiser and Western-style performance bikes, it’s easy to forget that Trumpet has been making performance streetfighters in more of an Italian or Japanese style in the form of its Speed Triple family. The name is a reference to the old Speed Twin, and the Triple family tree has grown through a few branches to bring us to the almost all-new-for-2016 Speed Triple S and Speed Triple R.

As more and more Western riders — Americans specifically — become more aware and covetous of performance road machines from someone other than the Big Four in Japan, I expect this family will make a suitable candidate if your short list includes some of the streetfighters from Beemer, MV Agusta, KTM, Ducati and the like. Join me while I check out the new stuff Trumpet has in store for us this year.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Speed Triple S and Speed Triple R.

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2016 Triumph Street Twin

2016 Triumph Street Twin

2016 Triumph Street Twin
2016 Triumph Street Twin
2016 Triumph Street Twin
2016 Triumph Street Twin
2016 Triumph Street Twin
2016 Triumph Street Twin
2016 Triumph Street Twin
2016 Triumph Street Twin

No matter what style of bikes you prefer, if you are old enough to legally ride street bikes, chances are pretty good that you’ve heard of the Triumph Bonneville family. Originally released in 1959, the Bonnie quickly became popular with speedsters in the U.S. and abroad, and it inspired numerous incarnations spanning decades, and even Triumph brand-name and factory owners.

The line underwent numerous redesigns over the years, but always kept that classic British flavor and dated panache that is both aesthetically pleasing and rooted in its own past. The Bonneville Street Twin joins Triumph’s new-for-2016 Modern Classics group that includes the Bonneville T120 family and the Thruxton R. Today, I want to take a look at the Street Twin and see how well Trumpet did in upholding the reputation of the venerable Bonnie line.

Continue reading for my review of the Triumph Street Twin.

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2015 Triumph Thunderbird

2015 Triumph Thunderbird

2015 Triumph Thunderbird
2015 Triumph Thunderbird
2015 Triumph Thunderbird
2015 Triumph Thunderbird
2015 Triumph Thunderbird
2015 Triumph Thunderbird
2015 Triumph Thunderbird
2015 Triumph Thunderbird

Laid back and relaxed, the Thunderbird is exactly the way a cruiser should be.
But, on top of that, Triumph engineering has added superior performance and handling without ever diluting what the Thunderbird is all about.

The engine itself is unique in its class, a classic Triumph parallel twin. And the styling is pure cruiser with sweeping lines, low seat and high bars. But like any Triumph it’s highly practical too, and perfectly feasible as an everyday commuter. A long, low, fat-tyred, chromed up, everyday commuter.

Continue reading for more information on the Triumph Thunderbird.

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2015 Triumph America LT

2015 Triumph America LT

2015 Triumph America LT
2015 Triumph America LT
2015 Triumph America LT
2015 Triumph America LT
2015 Triumph America LT
2015 Triumph America LT
2015 Triumph America LT
2015 Triumph America LT

From a cross-town hop to an intercontinental tour, the America LT will take you there in style. Based on the engine, chassis and legendary styling of Triumph America, the LT adds a layer of touring capability and an enviable range of factory fitted extras designed to make those longer distances a breeze. All the while maintaining the traditional deep chrome and polished detailing demanded of a classic cruiser, of course.

Continue reading for more information on the Triumph America LT.

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2013 Triumph Thruxton

2013 Triumph Thruxton

2013 Triumph Thruxton
2013 Triumph Thruxton
2013 Triumph Thruxton
2013 Triumph Thruxton
2013 Triumph Thruxton
2013 Triumph Thruxton
2013 Triumph Thruxton
2013 Triumph Thruxton

With its classy lines, big headlight and the refined fuel tank, the 2013 Triumph Thruxton is certainly an eye catcher that will appeal to those who are searching for a classic looking café racer.

Once on board you are met by low rise bars and a spacious seat which combine to offer a pretty sporty riding position. Other features worthy of being mentioned include the aluminum-rimmed spoked wheels (18 inch front and 17 inch rear), megaphone style exhaust and front and rear disc brakes.

The 2013 Triumph Thruxton is built around a modern 865cc parallel-twin, air-cooled, DOHC engine which rewards you with a maximum output of 68 hp at 7400 rpm and 69 Nm of torque at 5800 rpm. The engine’s power is kept under control by a five speed transmission which offers an average fuel efficiency of 50 mpg.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2013 Triumph Thruxton.

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2013 Triumph Scrambler

2013 Triumph Scrambler

2013 Triumph Scrambler
2013 Triumph Scrambler
2013 Triumph Scrambler
2013 Triumph Scrambler
2013 Triumph Scrambler
2013 Triumph Scrambler
2013 Triumph Scrambler
2013 Triumph Scrambler

With its classic style and the old school stance, the 2013 Triumph Scrambler looks like a blast from the past. And there is no wonder why, because when designing the Scrambler, Triumph’s engineers have drawn inspiration from the 60s Triumph off-road sports motorcycles that were stripped down for racing.

In terms of style, we especially like the Scrambler’s classic gaiters and high swept chromed side pipes, as well as the spoked wheels, high footrests and the wide off-road style handlebars.

The motorcycle’s backbone is represented by a strong tubular steel cradle frame which is combined with 41mm forks and chromed spring twin shocks with adjustable preload.

Needless to say that the Scrambler’s center piece is, of course the engine – an air-cooled, DOHC, parallel-twin unit that sends its power to the ground through a five speed gearbox. The engine rewards you with an average fuel consumption of 53 mpg.

Hit the jump for more information on the 2013 Triumph Scrambler.

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