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Yamaha Virago

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Yamaha Virago Gets Custom Treatment From Open Road Customs

Yamaha Virago Gets Custom Treatment From Open Road Customs

The Yamaha Virago may have not reached the same level of fame as some of Iwata’s more popular models, but it has reached a certain level of acclaim among motorcycle customizers, a lot of whom have turned to the Virago to satisfy their aftermarket needs. One such bike builder is Jacques Peters of Open Road Customs. In search of a rustic metal to turn into a custom bike, Peters tapped the services of noted Yamaha specialist Greg Hageman, who proceeded to point him in the direction of the Virago. Thus, the Virago “Dirty Mexican” was born.

The Dirty Mexican is a far departure from what you’d expect out of a Virago. That’s a credit to the exquisite work done by Peters and Open Road Customs. The whole point of the project was to turn the Virago into a quintessential piece of art, the kind of bike that exuded the aura of a machine that was everything the Virago wasn’t.

The first order of business was to give the bike a stylish bodywork that screamed of Peters’ vision for the bike. Once that was taken cared of, Peters and Open Road Customs enlisted the help of Sideshow Cycles to come up with custom fenders to help complement the bike’s aesthetic appeal.

The custom builder then added new off-road bars and slapped on a pair of rugged tires to enable the Dirty Mexican to ride in rough and tough terrain. Other new components like a new headlight, custom turn signals, and a new seat decorated to reflect Mexico’s proud heritage - that includes tequila, apparently - complete the bike’s dramatic makeover.

All that and yet, this is the best part. Open Road Customs is actually selling the bike on eBay. It has a starting price of AUD 9,500, which is around $7,500 based on current exchange rates. If you want to skip the whole auction bit, you can get the bike at a “Buy Now” price of AUD 13,500, or close to $11,000.

Continue to read more about Open Road Customs’ "Dirty Mexican" bike.

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Yamaha Virago café racer means business

Yamaha Virago café racer means business

This 1981 Yamaha Virago 750 was transformed into a café racer in Haaksbergen in the Netherlands to pay tribute to the Zero Engineering style and it turns out that the bike manages to capture the very essence of the world’s first sportbike (the café racer) and add a little something to it, meaning fat tires.

Although details about the project are scarce, we can see that the original engine and transmission were kept, but also the Virago’s gas tank. The mag rims are also present, but unlike the standard bike, this café racer features 15-inch rims with big fat tires instead of a 17-inch one at the front. That’s what gives it that aggressive note, while the café racer rear end, clubman bars and the black paintjob complete the “don’t mess with me” state that it induces. See it for yourself.

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2007 Yamaha Virago 250

2007 Yamaha Virago 250

Cruiser style starts here.
Getting into the fun of V-twin cruising has never been more affordable than with this nimble, confidence-inspiring and economical cruiser.

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