The wheels of automotive manufacturing might are spinning faster at Ford’s Kansas City and Dearborn assembly plants. Ford has announced it will add 1,550 new manufacturing jobs in the coming weeks as initial sales of the all-new 2015 F-150 and other F-Series trucks post their biggest January numbers in 11 years.

Totaling 54,370 F-Series trucks sold in January, reports show 18 percent of that was the new F-150, or 9,787 units. That’s not bad considering “F-Series trucks” includes the Super Duty; the automaker is still selling the previous generation F-150; and the both factories are not at full production. In fact, the Kansas City plant is still in the midst of overhauling its assembly line for the new truck.

In order to meet demand, those 1,550 new jobs will be spread between Kansas City Assembly, Dearborn Stamping, Dearborn Diversified, and the Sterling Axle facilities. Once everything reaches full capacity, Ford will be able to produce more than 700,000 F-150s annually. That capacity is critical as Ford has a history of exceeding 900,000 units sold in a calendar year.

What’s more, Ford has announced some 300 to 500 manufacturing workers will receive a pay raise from the base $19.28 hourly rate to a $28.50 hourly rate. This comes as Ford reaches its maximum allotted number of entry-level workers specified in the 2011 UAW-Ford collective bargaining agreement.

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Why It Matters

The 2015 F-150 is a game-changer for Ford in many ways, not the least of which is its new aluminum skin. The lightweight material necessitates new processes in manufacturing, meaning much of Ford’s plants needed drastic updates. As the Dearborn assembly plant works to keep up, the added jobs will help smooth production woes. Once Ford’s Kansas City plant comes online, F-150 production will skyrocket. It’s also welcomed news that several hundred Ford employees will receive a rather nice pay raise.

2015 Ford F-150

2015 Ford F-150 - image 537937

The 2015 Ford F-150 is the latest and greatest pickup from the Blue Oval. Headlining the truck’s features is its all-aluminum bodywork and its strengthened steel frame. Also new for 2015 is the truck’s 2.7-liter EcoBoost V-6 engine.

The new turbocharged V-6 produces V-8 levels of performance at 325 horsepower and 375 pound-feet of toque while offering V-6 levels of fuel economy. Ford still offers the base 3.5-liter, naturally aspirated V-6, the 5.0-liter V-8, and the range-topping 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6.

Prices for the 2015 F-150 start at $26,615 and rises well north of the $50,000 mark for higher end trim levels.

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Press Release

Ford Adds 1,550 Jobs to Support Demand for All-New F-150; Hundreds of Entry-Level Workers to Attain ’New Traditional’ Status

  • Ford is adding 1,550 new jobs to its Kansas City Assembly, Dearborn Stamping, Dearborn Diversified and Sterling Axle facilities to meet growing demand for the all-new 2015 F-150 – the toughest, smartest, most capable F-150 ever
  • As part of Ford’s commitment in the 2011 UAW-Ford collective bargaining agreement, approximately 300 to 500 workers – the first group of “new traditional” employees – will transition in the first quarter, based on attrition and growth, to $28.50 an hour
  • The entry-level agreement has enabled Ford to invest more than $6.2 billion in its U.S. plants and hire more than 15,000 hourly UAW members – up from the 12,000 jobs that were promised by 2015 in the contract agreement
  • In January, Ford F-Series had its strongest sales month since 2004; F-150 sits just 12 days on dealer lots – turning faster than any other Ford vehicle

As Ford ramps up production of the all-new F-150, the company today announced it will add 1,550 new jobs across its Kansas City Assembly, Dearborn Stamping, Dearborn Diversified and Sterling Axle facilities in the first quarter of 2015. The new jobs will support production and growing customer demand for the recently launched 2015 Ford F-150.

With these new jobs, Ford has reached its entry-level allowance outlined in the 2011 UAW-Ford collective bargaining agreement. As a result, approximately 300 to 500 workers – the first group of “new traditional” employees – will transition, based on attrition and growth, from their entry-level wage of $19.28 an hour to their new wage of $28.50 an hour. The majority of these employees work at Kansas City, Chicago and Louisville assembly facilities.

“Thanks to stronger than expected customer demand, we’re adding 1,550 new workers to support additional F-150 production,” said Joe Hinrichs, Ford president, The Americas. “These jobs are further proof that customers recognize the all-new F-150 as the toughest, smartest, most capable F-150 ever. We sell every truck we can build, and we plan to build more.”

Of the 1,550 new jobs, 900 are allocated for Kansas City Assembly and 500 will be added between Dearborn Stamping and Dearborn Diversified, with the remaining 150 jobs going to Sterling Axle. These jobs are in addition to the more than 5,000 hourly jobs Ford added across its U.S. manufacturing facilities in 2014.

“This is very exciting news and these additional jobs will have an impact in communities all across our nation,” said Jimmy Settles, UAW vice president and director, National Ford Department. “This also represents a major milestone for employees hired under the entry level agreement, as many will now begin to convert to ‘new traditional’ wage status, as negotiated in the 2011 collective bargaining agreement.”

The entry-level agreement negotiated as part of UAW-Ford collective bargaining has helped improve Ford’s competitiveness and enabled the company to invest more than $6.2 billion in its U.S. manufacturing facilities. Ford has hired more than 15,000 hourly UAW members – exceeding its goal of creating 12,000 hourly jobs in the United States by 2015.

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